Making the Perfect Ambrosia—The Familiar Heavenly Salad Now Made Healthy — March 15, 2021

Making the Perfect Ambrosia—The Familiar Heavenly Salad Now Made Healthy

20141219-ambrosia-vicky-wasik-2.jpg

Ambrosia…the “stuff” on the table on the holiday of every single home in the Deep South where I’m from and that that contained whatever your Mom and grandmother could possibly find to put in it—such as canned sweetened pinrapple, canned Mandarin orange slices, , gooey mini marshmallows, coconut, sugar-soaked maraschino cherriesbananasstrawberries, peeled grapes, and crushed pecans, fruit cocktail…all smothered in some other sort of thick, creamy binder probably processed food—such as mayonnaise, Cool Whip, heavy cream sour creamcream cheesepuddingyogurt, or cottage cheese….and then refrigerated for a few hours or even overnight to allow the flavors to meld.

What a waste of fresh produce perhaps…..not to mention an early introduction to processed foods.

Definitely not a food on the table that an ancient Greek god of mythology would have put on his plate without his mother making him do it.

While there is really no real consensus on what ambrosia should contain, ambrosia drums up memories from the past—either can be a cheap, sensory blast from the past…or a wistful nostalgia for their grandparents’ old recipes.

And there are various questions that you could ask yourself, such as…

  • Is it a dessert or a salad?
  • Should one use coconut or not?
  • What about marshmallows or whipped cream?
  • What variety of fruit should it have?
  • How did it come to exist at all?
  • Why did it become a Southern Christmas tradition?
  • And probably most importantly, how do we keep ambrosia from being a sugar-laden conglomeration of processed foods and sugar?

 ************************

Ambrosia and the 1800’s

It’s hard to imagine a time when something as simple as layers of sliced oranges, grated coconut, and a touch of sugar could so delight diners.

Perhaps the first recipe for ambrosia was found in the 1867 cookbook Dixie Cookery: or How I Managed My Table for Twelve Years, written by Maria Massey Barringer.

Her recipe for ambrosia is a simple three-ingredient dish…”Grate the white part of the cocoanut [sic], sweeten with a little sugar, and place in a glass bowl, in alternate layers with pulped oranges, having a layer of cocoanut on top. Serve in ice-cream plates or saucers.”.

People soon began “twanking” the recipe to include anything from sliced pineapple, a little sherry or Madeira, bananas, pineapple, strawberries, orange or lemon juice, cherries, dates, papayas, peaches, and pears.

Recipes for ambrosia were soon found in cooking and household columns of newspapers everywhere. 

The fact that ambrosia became closely associated with Christmas in the South at this time perfectly makes sense for several reasons…

  • Coconuts became more available around the same time, thanks to the newly completed railroads linking the West Coast with the east.
  • Florida orange season began in the late fall, so in December fresh oranges would have just become available in the markets.
  • The sheer novelty of formerly exotic foods was enough to make such a dish special.

****************************************** 

The Making of a Southern Tradition

Even though most cooks continued to use this basic recipe—orange, coconut and sugar—for making ambrosia, many cooks started adding more modern and sweeter components—especially marshmallows.

Although Ancient Egyptians had used marshmallow plants…an herb native to parts of Europe, North Africa, and Asia which grows in marshes and other damp areas…back as early as 2000 BC…surprisingly, they used the marshmallow for medicinal purposes—such as soothing coughs and sore throats and healing wounds.

Eating marshmallows was a privilege strictly reserved for royalty…and the manufacture of marshmallows was limited.

But In the early to mid-1800s, France confectioners began pressing the marshmallow sap in candy molds and marketing this candy as “Pâte de Guimauve”…a spongy-soft dessert made from whipping dried marshmallow roots with sugar, water, and egg whites.

Even so making marshmallows from the sap od the mallow plant was too time-consuming for marshmallows to be affordable to be enjoyed by the average Joe.

But thanks to companies such as Stephen F. Whitman & Son of Philadelphia, marshmallows were introduced to the United States and available for mass consumption…sold in tins as penny candy…and used in a variety of recipes—such as banana fluff.

The Whitman company introduced what most of us refer to as “marshmallow cream” around World War I,

So at this time, the late 1920s to 1930s, people began publishing recipes containing this marshmallow cream all across the country—especially recipes for ambrosia, salads that included oranges, bananas, pineapple, strawberries, along with grated coconut and some orange and lemon juice poured over the top…

Ambrosia soon became associated with holidays around the South…the one dish that no Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner “required.”

 

***********************

The 1970s and 1980s

Back when I was growing up…ambrosia basically was a term used to describe any fruit salad smothered in something so that the fruit was unrecognizable…anything from expansive fruit salad with lots of citrus and non-citrus fruits tossed with coconut…strange, bright orange concoctions made with flavored gelatin, canned whipped cream, and plenty of marshmallows…traditional mixtures of fresh sliced oranges, grated coconut, and a sprinkling of sugar….a bag of sweetened shredded coconut and supremed orange sections, occasionally with a few Maraschino cherries and some little marshmallows for visual interest.

And including a variety of ingredients.

  • Fruits such as cherries, dates, papayas, peaches, pears…
  • Smothering stuff such as mayo, sour cream, marshmallow cream, Coo. Whip, cream cheese…
  • Flavorings such as rum, grenadine, almonds…

 

The Recipe

Obviously you can still make ambrosia out of pretty much anything you darn well want to, but the goal is to make it fresher and to cut back on processed foods…

But here’s a recipe that is a good jumping off point for making heavenly ambrosia…

Ingredients

  • 2 cherimoya, peeled, seeded and cubed
  • 6 navel oranges
  • 1 pineapple, peeled, cored, and cut into cubes
  • 1C fresh shredded coconut
  • 1 large banana
  • 4.5oz maraschino cherries, drained well (optional)
  • 1C mini marshmallows
  • ½C pineapple juice
  • 1C vanilla Greek yogurt

Instructions

  • Toss all of the fruit together in a bowl.
  • Let sit for 5 minutes.
  • Stir together juice and yogurt.
  • Add to the fruit.
  • Mix gently until combined.
  • Refrigerate anywhere from thirty minutes to a day or two, but the longer it sits in the fridge, the smooshier the  salad will become…which explains why most of us remember ambrosia as the smooshy gross stuff that we all avoided on the Chr1istmas buffet back home when we were little.

Making the Perfect Avocado Pudding — February 11, 2021

Making the Perfect Avocado Pudding

 Chocolate Avocado Pudding with Coconut Milk

 

The perfect avocado pudding is not some sort of sweet guacamole…but a sweet, rich and decadent creamy pudding.

The perfect avocado pudding is a great, delicious and good-looking dessert that you will be proud of serving because it is actually chock-full of healthy ingredients—banana for sweetening…lots of cocoa for a rich chocolaty taste…whipped coconut milk for airy texture and more sweetness…and finally avocado simply serves to bind all of the other ingredients together and provide creaminess.

 

  • 2 ripe medium avocados
  • 1/3C cocoa or carob powder
  • 1/4C coconut milk
  • 2tsp vanilla
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • Toppings of choice…such as strawberries, coconut flakes, cherries, raspberries

Add the peeled avocados, banana, cocoa powder, maple syrup, vanilla and salt. Blend until a creamy paste forms. Set aside. Whip the coconut milk with a hand mixer until it obtains a mousse-like texture. Refrigerate at least one hour before serving.

 

Making the Perfect Coconut Granola —

Making the Perfect Coconut Granola

 

The perfect coconut granola is the perfect combination of oats, nuts, seeds, add-ins, fruit, sweetener—such as honey or maple syrup.

The perfect coconut granola is not only the perfect simple and fast breakfast…but also the perfect after school snack…the perfect topping for yogurt, ice cream, milk or fresh fruit…the perfect food for camping trips and road trips.

The perfect coconut granola can be made ahead of time and stored for weeks.

 

 

 

***********

Ingredients

The Oats…4C…Old-fashioned oats will keep their shape during baking, but use certified gluten-free oats if you need gluten-free granola. Do not use instant or quick oats.

 

The Fruit…1C…Whether or not you actually use fruit is totally up to you, but fruit adds extra sweetness, chewy texture, and more flavor to your finished granola. Any dried fruit will work—dried cherries, dried cranberries, dried apricots, raisins, mixed dried berries

 

The Coconut…2/3C unsweetened flaked coconut

 

 

The Sweetener…1/3 cup maple syrup or honey or agave nectar…Use whichever one you like the best or what you have on hand. Another option would be 1/4C brown sugar. Such  sweeteners stick to the oats and give you plenty of sweet chunks in the mix. You can use whatever kind of sweetener and oil that you’d like, but the coating for your granola should be about half sweetener and half oil.

 

 

 

The Nuts and Seeds…1C…Good option would be any one or a combination of the following…almonds, walnuts, pecans, pistachios, pepitas, sunflower seeds, cashews, peanuts, and macadamia nuts.

 

 

The Oil…2/3C melted coconut oil…The oil is what makes the granola crispy. Substitutes for coconut oil include extra virgin olive oil or butter.

 

The Salt…1/2tsp…Salt adds flavor to your granola. Try using fine-grain sea salt instead of regular table salt. 

 

 

The Spices…1tsp…Spices can give your granola a subtle warming flavor. Good options include ginger, pumpkin pie spice, cinnamon.

 

The Vanilla…2tsp vanilla…simply because you’re baking something…have you ever noticed that whenever you’re baking anything at all, one of the ingredients is always vanilla…and you start by preheating your oven to 350…

  1.  

 

Optional Mix-Ins…Feel free to experiment by adding whatever else you want,,,such as 2tsp lemon or orange zest, mini chocolate chips, small candies like M&M’s, chia seeds…you name it…or find it…

  1.  

****************

Instructions
 

Preheat oven to 300°F. Line rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Whisk together oil, sweetener, salt, and spices. Add oats and almonds. Stir to coat well. Press the granola into an even layer onto the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 20 minutes, stirring only once halfway through cooking. Remove from the oven. Add the fruit. Press and tamp down the granola before it cools to help the granola stick together. Cool completely before storing. Avoid jostling the granola on the pan any more than you gave to until it cools completely. Once completely cooled, transfer to an airtight container, where it will keep for up to a month.



Nature’s Own Sports Drink — February 3, 2021

Nature’s Own Sports Drink

Dubbed by marketers as “Mother Nature’s sports drink,” coconut water has become a “trendy” beverage in recent years…a beverage that is had said to not only hydrate the body, but also to help with a whole host of conditions—including hangovers,  cancer and kidney stones.

Coconut water is a tasty refreshing beverage that is also good for you because it is loaded with several important nutrients, including minerals that most people don’t get enough of.

Coconut water is the clear liquid naturally found in the center of a young, green coconut.

Coconuts take about a year to fully mature. As the coconut matures, the water is replaced by coconut meat…but if the coconut is being grown to make coconut water, the coconut is harvested when the coconut is  about seven months old. The younger the fruit, the more water it contains.

Coconut water is different from coconut milk. Coconut water comes straight from the coconut…whereas coconut milk is coconut meat that has been ground up and mixed with water.

*************

Nutrition

  • So many of us are trying to steer clear of processed, artificially-sweetend or flavored foods these days…including fortified cereals, unhealthy snacks, and energy drinks that contain caffeine and artificial ingredients. Coconut water may be a great alternative.
  • Coconut water is low in calories…naturally free of fat…a good source of fiber…low in carbohydrates and sodium…rich in potassium…a great source of several vitamins and minerals, such as magnesium and vitamin C.
  • All without artificial ingredients or additives that may be unhealthy.
  • And not to mention super hydrating.
  • Calories…An 8-ounce serving of coconut water contains 45 calories…about the same found in the same amount of Gatorade.
  • Sugar…Most unflavored coconut water contains 1.3 grams of sugar per ounce…less sugar than many sports drinks and much less sugar.
  • Vitamins…Coconut water is a great source of vitamin C…a single eight ounce serving contains 10%RDI.
  • Minerals…One cup coconut water has more potassium than four bananas…61mg potassium17% of the RDI.

********************

Health Benefits

  • Coconut water has become a popular sports drink for those of us seeking energy, hydration, and endurance.
  • But let’s look at some of the other benefits that coconut water provides.

************

Bloating

Many people experience uncomfortable swelling after meals that are high in sodium. Coconut water contains the potassium needed to counteract these high levels of sodium and keep your belly from swelling.

*******************

Blood Pressure

Coconut water is effective in keeping your blood sugar levels down because of the amounts of magnesium and potassium that it contains. Potassium is often given to heart patients to strengthen their hearts.

************

Energy

If you want to avoid that tired, draggy feeling in the early afternoon, drink some coconut water. Coconut water contains carbohydrates and electrolytes that rehydrate the body and are great for a quick energy boost…that’s why athletes swear by it.

***********************

Hangover Remedy

If you drank too much alcohol the night before and are now enjoying the headache and hazy feeling of a good old-fashioned hangover, try starting the day with coconut water.  The electrolytes in coconut water replenish the body with the minerals and nutrients needed for you to function effectively and rehydrates your parched system.

********************

Immune System

Coconut water has a healthy supply of vitamin C which is important for…

  • boosting your immune system
  • eliminating impurities
  • fighting illness and infection
  • killing germs
  • preventing colds and flu

*****************

Kidney Stones

Thank goodness I’ve never had a kidney stone, but I hear that they really, really hurt…and sometimes require surgery.

Whar are kidney stones?

Kidney stones are crystals formed from whenever your body has too so much calcium and oxalate that these adhere to your kidneys to form kidney stones.

Whenever you have kidney stones, doctors often recommend that you drink plenty of water, but coconut water is actually more effective than plain water in preventing the development of these crystals.

*******************

Muscle Cramps

Cramps that are a result of such thibs as pre-menstrual syndrome, a long run or weightlifting, or potassium deficiency can be painful and debilitating, Coconut water nourishes muscles and prevents cramps because it is rich in potassium and muscle-nourishing.

***********

Obesity

Sodas…or as we say in the Deep South…typically contain tons of sugar…and even when you buy sugar-free soda, it still contains chemicals and preservatives that are unhealthy for you.

Coconut water on the other hand, contains no calories, provides more nutritional value, is naturally free of additives and artificial sweeteners….making it a healthier alternative.

*****************

Skin

In order for your skin to look its best, it is essential that you consume a steady supply of water, vitamins, and minerals.

Breadfruit….The How — January 19, 2021

Breadfruit….The How

Photo by Trang Doan on Pexels.com
Breadfruit is probably not one of those fruits that you simply wanna grab and take a big bite of… Try if it you want, but most people will find the taste and texture of uncooked breakfast more than a little unpleasant. However, if the unripened breadfruit is boiled until tender, the breadfruit will have a more potato-ish texture…similar to freshly baked bread. In fact, the best way to think about uses for breadfruit is to treat it as if it were a potato of sorts and cook it accordingly—mashed, in salads, made into fries and chips, etc. In fact, breadfruit can be used as a delicious substitute for any starchy root crop, rice, pasta, vegetable, or potato. But breadfruit is actually better than potatoes because they are actually more nutritious. So like the potatoes, breadfruit can be prepared in many ways—steamed, baked, sauteed, boiled, fried… And like potatoes, breadfruit can be used in a variety of dishes—casseroles, curries, stews and chowders, salads, and chips.

*************

Ripeness

The riper the breadfruit, the softer and creamier and sweeter it becomes…similar to a banana…with a custardy, bread-like taste…meaning that riper breadfruit are great for can be used for fritters, pancakes, bread, beverages, and other baked goods

Breadfruit is a staple ingredient in many cuisines—especially Caribbean, Latin America, and Polynesian…for making both sweet and savory dishes. Here are a few recipes worth trying… Philippinesginataang langka Sri Lankacurry Indiafritters Jamaicasoup Breadfruit flour can be used a good gluten-free substitute for panko or breadcrumbs…and actually has a much better taste and greater nutritional value than any other gluten-free flour alternative available. Breadfruit seeds can also be cooked an eaten…making them a a nutritious, savory snack with a crunch.

***************

Where to Find

If you don’t live in the back of the backwoods like Middle of Nowhere, Mississippi… where I’m from…you might be able to go to your closest Caribbean specialty food store…

If you happen to live in Hawaii or be there even in the midst of all this corona crap, you will find breadfruit readily available…probably labeled as “ulu”…In fact, breadfruit is so common in Hawaii that there is even a National Breadfruit Institute of Hawai’i.  For the rest of us, you could also try your local farmers’ market or wait until your next box of ugly produce comes in and you luck out and get breadfruit in your assortment.

************************

Choosing and Storing

If you are choosing your breadfruit yourself, make sure that the breadfruit is firm. You want the skin to be greenish-yellow with only a little brown cracking.

The fruit bruises easily so check for bruises or soft spots. Some brown cracking is okay, but not too much. Store breadfruit in your fridge…(future post on which fruits and veggies to store in fridge and which not to…as well as how to organize your fridge coming soon…maybe four years from now)… In conclusion, hopefully you also will be checking breadfruit off your list of foods on the Raw Foods Pyramid  yet to try…as you join me in this quest to embrace a healthier lifestyle.
Developing a Passion for Banana Passion Fruit — January 11, 2021

Developing a Passion for Banana Passion Fruit

Before starting this series on tropical fruits, I had honestly never even heard of banana passion fruit…and I still honestly haven’t figured out where the closest place to buy it is…but since it is a tropical fruit, I’m gonna go ahead and include here in this chapter…(think once I finish crawling up the Raw Foods Pyramid, I may try to put it all together into a book…probably too lofty of a goal, but hey we are all making New Year’s resolutions right now anyway)…

 

 

 

*****************************************

Banana Passion Fruit…The What

Banana passion fruit are native to many areas of South America—particularly Colombia, Bolivia, Ecuador, Venezuela, and Peru.

Banana passion fruit grows on vines that can be as tall…or long, not sure which word would be correct here…as twenty-two feet….and that have attractive, deep pink blossoms. The vines are commonly used in landscaping to cover trellises.

plant is known to live for up to twenty years. A mature banana passion fruit vine can produce up to three hundred banana passion fruits. 

The fruit itself is oblong and about four inches long. The orange-scented fruit has a  thick, leathery skin that changes from green to bright yellow as the fruit ripens…and juicy, sweet pulp that is studded with black seeds.

The pulp is juicy and sweet, with a tart bite and hints of banana. Although the seeds are edible, they can be somewhat bitter…

Banana passion fruit is available year-round in the tropics, with a peak season in the spring and fall months.

However…interestingly enough…it is illegal to sell and distribute the plant in New Zealand and Hawaii because it is considered to be an invasive species that can quickly take over and deprive other native plants from the sun.

 

 

 

***************************************

Banana Passion Fruit…The Why

Banana passionfruit are a good source of the following nutrients…

  • antioxidants
  • calcium
  • carbohydrates
  • fiber
  • iron
  • phosphorus
  • protein
  • vitamins A and C

 

 

 

****************************************

Banana Passion Fruit…The Why

As long as you store ripe banana passion fruit in an open paper bag in the fridge, they will last for around a week.

Although banana passion fruit is best eaten as it is instead of trying to cook or make something else out of it, here are some more ideas as far as using banana passion fruit…

  • desserts such as cakes, cheesecake and pies
  • fruit salads
  • ice cream
  • juices
  • parfaits
  • relishes, jams and other preserves
  • smoothies
  • yogurt 

So let’s take a look in the following posts at a few of these ideas…shall we?!

Let’s Go Ape Over Bananas — November 23, 2020

Let’s Go Ape Over Bananas

Bananas chopped up in a bowl

Of course we all know what a banana is…

In fact, we all seem to go apes over bananas…so much so that in the United States, each person eats about eleven pounds of bananas per year…making it Americans’ favorite fresh fruit.

Bananas in fact are a favorite fruit worldwide…having first been grown in Southeast Asia, they are now grown in many warm parts of the world.

The perfect banana is wonderfully sweet with firm and creamy flesh.

Contrary to your grocery store produce aisle may have you to believe, there are actually several different types of bananas—varying in color, size and shape.

The most common type is the Cavendish, a type of dessert banana. These bananas are green when unripe…and then yellow as they mature.

Banana plants vary in height…anywhere from ten to twenty-six feet. The leaves are arranged spirally and may grow to be about nine feet long and two feet wide. The leaves of the banana tree are easily torn by the wind, resulting in the familiar frond look.

Bananas can also vary in taste from starchy to sweet, and texture from firm to mushy…depending on what variety you choose and how ripe the bananas are.

Greener, less ripe bananas are more starchy…whereas yellow bananas taste sweeter because they contain more sugar.

The actual bananas are gathered into bunches…made up of anywhere from three to twenty tiers. The bunch itself can weigh anywhere from sixty-five to one hundred pounds.

Some of the edible varieties, ranging in color from yellow to red, pink, purple and black…varying in both flavor and texture…include… 

  • Blue Java Banana…Blue Java bananas are also known as the ice cream banana due to their sweet vanilla flavor and extreme creaminess. They feature a beautiful blue peel and a white flesh. They’re actually pretty hardy and can grow in colder regions….
  • Blue Java. Also called “ice cream” bananas because they’re said to taste like vanilla ice cream, these have a bluish-silvery peel that turns pale yellow when ripe.
  • Cavendish. The most widely exported banana in the world, the Cavendish has a sturdy peel that travels well. Almost all bananas sold in the United States and Europe are this variety.
  • Goldfinger. This newer variety from Honduras has a sweet and slightly apple-like flavor.
  • Gros Michel. Also known as Big Mike, this was the top-exported banana until much of the crop was wiped out by a fungus in the 1950s. It’s similar in taste and size to Cavendish and still available in some places.
  • Lady Finger Banana…Lady Finger bananas, also known as baby bananas, are sweeter and smaller than Cavendish bananas. They’re usually around three inches in length and feature a creamy texture and sweet flavor with notes of honey.
  • Manzano. Also called “apple bananas,” these short, chubby fruits have a hint of apple and strawberry. They’re fully ripe and taste best when the skin turns black. Manzano is the most popular dessert variety in the tropics.
  • Mysore. This small fruit is the most important banana crop in India. It has a thin skin and a hint of tartness.
  • Praying Hands. You’ll recognize this variety by the two adjacent “hands” that grow fused together, giving the fruit its name. It’s less sweet than other types and has a subtle vanilla flavor.
  • Red. The thick skin of red bananas starts red or maroon but turns yellow-orange when ripe. The flesh is sweet and tinged with pink or orange.      
Mastering Ministrone — November 19, 2020

Mastering Ministrone

So now that we’ve bought the perfect pot, found the perfect recie, bought the best veggies, sliced and diced, and so forth…

Now what?

1.Constantly keep an eye on your soup while it is cooking. This will allow you to  adjust the spices and cooking temperature as needed.

2. Cook on low heat. Don’t think that cooking your soup at a higher temperature will ensure that everything will actually get cooked instead of being raw or hard when you are ready to serve the soup.

Doing this will instead turn your meat into tough, hard-to-chew pieces…not to mention possibly ruining the bottom of that expensive soup pot that we all went out and bought after reading a previous article, right?

Instead bring your soup slowly to a boil and then allow the soup to simmer for the rest of the cooking time.

This will allow the ingredients to maintain their structure and integrity, while at the same time combining all of the ingredients into a flavorful soup.

3. Cover or not?…Depending on the finished product that you want,  leaving the soup uncovered or covering the soup with the lid is a matter of personal  reference. Leaving the lid off will make the soup base evaporate faster, creating a thicker and more flavorful soup.

4, Dig in Deep…There are many soup recipes out there that  require taking some of the soup as it is cooking and blending it and then adding it back into the soup in order to thicken the soup. Using an immersion blender will reduce the risk of your getting burned and make this job easier and neater.

Here is a list from Good Housekeeping of some of the most highly recommended immersion blenders available…

5. Use your brain when using grains…Pasta and grains that are called for as ingredients will often overcook. Avoid this by cooking them separately and then adding them into the soup just before serving.

Making the Perfect Avocado Salad — November 17, 2020

Making the Perfect Avocado Salad

  •   Bowl of avocado salad The perfect avocado salad is simple—fresh avocado, thinly sliced red onion…different from standard guacamole in that it has way more depth of flavor and creamy chunks of avocado.

************************

Ingredients for Salad

  • 3 large avocados…peeled, pitted and diced
  • 2C English cucumbers…chopped into bite-sized pieces
  • 2C cherry tomatoes or 1 large ripe tomato, chopped
  • ½C radish, halved, cut into ⅛-inch thick slices
  • ½C red onion, cut into thin slices
  • 2tsp minced jalapeno pepper
  • 1/3C corn
  • 2Tbsp chopped cilantro
  • 3/4tsp salt
  • 1/8tsp pepper

*******************************

Ingredients for Salad Dressing

  • 2Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/4C olive oil
  • ¼C lime juice
  • 1Tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 2Tbsp honey

*******

Instructions

  • Make the Dressing…Stir all of the dressing ingredients except for the olive oil. Now very slowly drizzle in the avocado or olive oil, constantly whisking to break the fat into small droplets. This will help create a thicker salad dressing.
  • Combine salad ingredients…Stir your salad ingredients together in a second bowl.
  • Drizzle the dressing over the avocado salad.
Making the Perfectly Rockin’ Guac — November 16, 2020

Making the Perfectly Rockin’ Guac

The perfect guacamole is simple to make and like anything else that you make requires using only the freshest, highest quality ingredients—the perfect avocado…the perfect onion…the perfect tomatoes…and the perfect seasonings—such as cilantro, jalapeno pepper, lime juice, garlic and salt.

The perfect guacamole should be plain and simple….the perfect blend of high quality ingredients melded together beautifully.

*****************

The Avocados

The perfect avocados for making guacamole should be ripe, but firm….not soft and mushy avocados.

You can know that you are picking the best avocados by only choosing those that still have the stem attached. Avocados with the stem still attached are less likely to have brown spots on the inside.

If you gently press one end of the avocado, it should be firm, yet have a slight give to it.

Here is a tried and true guacamole recipe that’s easy to make, uses fresh ingredients and is loaded with flavor. 

****************

The Ingredients

3 avocados, ripe

1/2 small onion, finely diced

2 Roma tomatoes, diced

3Tbsp fresh cilantro, chopped

1 jalapeno pepper, seeds removed and finely diced

2 garlic cloves, minced

1/2tsp salt

1 lime, juiced…(Note that using fresh limes instead of bottled lime juice will make a huge difference)…

**************

Instructions

Slice your avocados in half. Remove the pit and skins. Put the flesh of the avocado in a mixing bowl.

Mash the avocados gently with a fork until you get them as chunky or smooth as you’d like.

Add the onions, tomatoes, cilantro, jalapeno pepper, garlic, lime juice and salt.

Place any leftover guacamole in a storage container…(yeah, right…as my house there is never any leftover guacamole)…Pat down firmly with a spoon so it’s nice and flat on top. Add about 1/2″ cold water on top. Place the lid on the storage container. Stick the container in the fridge.

The water will help keep the guacamole from oxidizing  and turning brown as quickly.

Once you’re ready to devour the rest of the guacamole, drain the water off the top and stir.