Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Let’s All Get Boiling Mad Together

Yeah, I know…I said that we would crawl our way up the Raw Foods Pyramid one food at a time…one tier at a time…

But…

My family will never be content to eat nutritional yeast and raw sweet potatoes for the rest of their lives.

So instead I have been getting acquainted with all the different cooking methods…what foods work best for which technique…how to use each method in creating not only meals that are healthier, but also more delicious.

I began looking at these different cooking methods by starting with what I thought were “moist cooking methods”…specifially sauteeing, pan frying, and deep frying.

Let’s consider a few characteristics that make certain cooking methods “moist” cooking methods…

  • 1. Moist-heat cooking methods involve cooking food with, or in, some type of liquid—such as steam, water, stock, or wine. Lately I have learned that many people do not consider these three methods to be “moist” cooking methods because…but, hey, we’ve already talked about it…so let’s move on and not join in on that debate.
  • 2. Moist-heat cooking methods involve using lower temperatures—ranging from 140°F to 212°F—(yeah, I know, we just talked about frying foods at 300-ish degrees…just go with it)…
  • 3. Moist-heat cooking methods soften tough fibers—such as meat protein or plant cellulose….which can be good or bad depending on the food that you are figuring out what to do with.
  • 4. Moist-heat cooking methods are typically simple and economical.
  • 5. Moist-heat cooking methods are more likely to preserve and maintain the water-soluble vitamins and other nutrients of the food, taking advantage of that food’s nutritional potential.
  • 6. Moist-heat cooking methods preserve and even add moisture to the food as it is cooking…important for cooking foods that need softening—such as hard vegetables, tough meat or dry grains and beans….
  • 7. Moist-heat cooking methods bring out more of the natural flavor in the food.

We have already looked at sauteeing, pan frying, and deep frying.

Some more common moist-heat cooking methods are…

  • boiling
  • braising
  • poaching
  • simmering
  • steaming
  • stewing

So let’s get boiling mad together in these next few posts, okay?!

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Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Meat and Taters Around the World—Switzerland

For our final Meat and Taters recipe from around the world, let’s travel to Switzerland…and try the rösti….(The word is actually pronounced “reursch-ti,” not  row-sti…as you might think when you first saw the word…and the word “rösti” translates as “crisp and golden,”.)…

This dish consists of grated potatoes that are shaped into 1″-5″ patties and served in wedges like pizza….kinda like a giant latke or potato pancake.

These latkes-of-a-sort are enjoyed primatily in the German-speaking area along the border between the French-speaking and the German-speaking parts of the country.

And even though this dish started out as a breakfast dish, and is now more commonly served as an accompaniment, often to egg or sausage dishes.

the Swiss now enjoy

This is a simple peasant dish that began with just two humble ingredients—

But feel free to branch out and try serving this along with smoked salmon, sour cream, chives, or braised Savoy cabbage, smoked ham, fried eggs, salmon roe, chopped onion, dill,  Swiss cheese

The perfect rösti is extra crispy on the outside…and soft and buttery on the inside….never an unpleasantly starchy flavour and greasy, raw interior…like the very best hash brown potatoes…but even more delicious.

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THE INGREDIENTS

  • 4 medium-sized potatoes…(Note…Waxy potatoes seem to maintain their shape better than starchy potatoes…and also produce a crunchier cake.)
  • 3Tbsp butter
    Salt
  • Pepper
  • Olive Oil
  • Optional ingredients…such as bacon, parsley, onions, nutmeg, pepper, or ground paprika, scallions

 

 

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Many chefs start a day ahead by parboiling their potatoes in salt water until just tender, but not soft…allowing them to cool…and then chilling their potatoes for a couple of hours or even overnight. This will eventually make the potatoes easier to grate and helps them stick together when you’re cooking them.

Anyway, regardless if you chill them or not, at least clean and peel your potatoes.

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Grate the peeled raw potatoes into a bowl. This is traditionally done by hand with a rosti grater…but honestly how many of us have rosti graters at home…and Alton warns us about “unitaskers” in how many episodes?

So instead do this with a box grater, food processor.

You want to use the larger holes on your box grater, not the smaller ones. This will mean not only faster work, but also better texture.

Let the potatoes rest for at least five minutes.

Now squeeze as much liquid as possible out of the potatoes by grabbing and squeezing fistfuls.

Transfer to a second bowl.

Season the potatoes with salt and pepper….Salting the grated raw potatoes at this point will “draw out” the excess water…making the rösti more crispy on the outside.

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Melt 3Tbsp butter in an 8″ nonstick or cast-iron skillet.

Add the grated potatoes to the pan, Use a metal spatula to spread the potatoes in a layer that is about 1″ deep.

Add salt, onions, spices

Cook over medium heat for ten minutes, stirring two or three times with a metal spatula to coat the potatoes evenly with butter and avoid “hot spots.”

Cook until the bottom of the pancake turns golden and crisp…and the top of the pancake starts to look translucent….about fifteen minutes.

 

 


FLIP

Once your potatoes have cooked on the bottom, it’s time to flip your pancake so that the other side can cook also.

This can be challenging.

But here’s how…

Using oven mitts, place a large plate bottom side up over the skillet. Invert the pan so that the pancake sits, cooked-side-up on the plate. Now flip the other side into the pan first so that side can cook also. 

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Finish Cooking and Serve

Add 2Tbsp more oil or butter to the pan.

Now slide the pancake back into the pan….browned side up.

Tent with foil.

Cook for another ten minutes…until the other side is also browned and the potatoes feel really tender in the middle.

Slide the rosti onto a plate, cutting board, or cooling rack.

Cut it into wedges.

Add more salt and pepper if desired.

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Meat and Taters Around the World—Sweden

Getting my five year old ready to start “real school” in the fall has reminded how there’s always one of THEM in almost any crowd…

The sibling that gets your mom the most expensive gift of any other sibling

The nerd in the class that always aces the test that most of us have just failed

The homeroom mother eight months pregnant, kid in tow, perfectly organizing the homeroom Christmas…or whatever the heck THEY acknowledge the holiday as this week…party

The relative that brings the fanciest side dish to the Thanksgiving side dish to the annual “let’s all get together and pretend like we all like each other once a year” ordeal…

Your sister in law was so proud of her mashed potatoes…until you showed up with your twice-baked potatoes…

But lo and behold…here comes THAT sibling…the one you’ve competed with and lived in the shadows of your entire life walking in fashionably late with nothing but…

HASSELBACK POTATOES

We can all thank Leif Elisson for being the overachiever in his cooking school and creating these potatoes back in 1953…when he was a chef in training at the famous restaurant at the Hasselbacken Hotel in Stockholm…an elegant hotel that first opened in 1748.

By the way the word Hasselback actually translates  “Hazel Hill.”

In fact, they can’t be possibly be as hard as they look like they would be to make if the Swedes enjoy them not only for “red calendar day” events…but also for breakfast, appetizers, lunch, dinner, and snacks.

They are basically a baked potato…so I’m not gonna go into depth as far as cooking them…already talked about that in this previous post…

These just go extra by requiring that you make a special series of deep parallel cuts along the top of the potato so that it opens into their expected fan shape….and then so that you can showboat various toppings on top.

Surprisingly these potatoes only take a little more effort than a regular baked potato…and can make such an impact when served alongside a special dinner—such as a holiday roast, date night steak, or Easter ham.

The perfect Hasselback potatoes have perfectly crispy, crunchy, and golden edges of French fries on the outside…the soft, buttery, creamy goodness of mashed potatoes on the inside….and the perfect amounts of cheddar, Parmesan cheese, fresh chives, sour cream, bacon, crumbled feta, spring onions, etc. 

 

 

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PREP

Preheat oven to 450°F. Line a rimmed baking sheet or a 9×13-inch pan with parchment paper or aluminum foil. Arrange a rack in the bottom third of the oven and heat to 425°F.

 

 

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SLICE

The one thing that separates a hasselback potato from a plain everyday baked potato is the way it is cut.

So settle on bringing mashed potatoes or twice-baked potatoes to the party until you master the technique.

First of all, it is important that you choose a good quality knife to cut your potatoes—one with a thin blade that is very sharp…(and have the number to the nearest CareNow clinic close at hand.)…

Slice a thin layer from the bottom of the potato to keep it from rolling around.

Place a potato between the handles of two wooden spoons or two chopsticks. This creates a “guardrail” that should help keep you from slicing the potato all the way through….the most important thing to not do whenever making this dish…(other than cooking them too long and burning both your potatoes and perhaps even your house.)

Another option to help guide you as you are making your cuts is to rest the potato in a large serving spoon.

Cut thin parallel slits about every 1/4″ across each of the potatoes, leaving 1/4″ at the bottom intact. The thinner the slices, the better the end result.

Push the knife straight down into the potato. Once your knife hits the chopsticks or edge of the spoon, stop slicing. Once again, it is important to make sure that the slices stay connected at the bottom of the potato.

Don’t worry about your slices being perfect, they will end up great regardless.

If all else fails, and you still suck at this, then order yourself a Hasselback potato cutting board…they’ll still be impressed…

Repeat with the remaining potatoes, sertting each on the prepared baking sheet once sliced.

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Making the Perfect French Fries

Homemade French Fries…why even bother when it would be so much easier either to drive thru McDonald’s or grab a bag of frozen fries out of your freezer…the one that’s probably been hiding in there for the last couple of years at least…goal for today—clean out freezer!!!

Because we are talking about the deep frying cooking methods and potatoes, and of course the topic of French fries would eventually come up.

The perfect French fries are extra astonishingly crispy on the outside, creamy on the inside.

French fries are actually very easy to make ahead and store in your freezer that you may never buy another bag of frozen fries ever, ever again…

 

 


The Potatoes

Which potatoes?

  • Yukon Gold…that’s why we’re learning about making French fries while we are on the topic of Yukon Gold potatoes…go figure, right?
  • Choose the largest ones you can find.

Why are Yukon Gold potatoes better?

  • …because they are less starchy and will turn out much crispier than any other type of potato.

How many potatoes?

  • Figure on two potatoes per person.

How do I slice the potatoes?

  • Slice the potatoes into ½” thick sticks. The thinner you cut your fries, the crispier they will be.
  • Wash the potatoes.
  • Peeling them at this point is purely a matter of personal preference.

Soaking Your Potatoes

Soak the potato slices in cold water for at least one hour, perhaps even overnight. The longer, the better.

Soaking your potatoes removes the starch and will end up making your French fries extra crispy and keep them from sticking to each other when you are cooking them.

 

 

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Cooking Your French Fries

 

Most cooks and chefs agree that the best way to getting those perfectly crispy fries that you’re craving is to double fry your potatoes—first for five or six minutes at 300° to cook the middle of the potato, and then frying them a second time at 400° to cook the outside.

Using a deep-fat thermometer will help ensure that the oil is at the proper temperature before you start adding your potatoes to the water.

Drain the potatoes.. Pat them dry with paper towels or a clean dishcloth.

Be sure to use a pot that is large and tall enough—such as a tall 8-quart soup pot, to contain the oil without overflowing when the potatoes are slipped in.

Pour enough oil into the pan that it measures about 1-1/2″ deep.

Heat the oil over high heat until it reaches 300.

Carefully drop small batches of potatoes to the hot oil. Frying too many French fries at once makes them less crispy.

The oil should bubble lightly.  The temperature of the oil will drop to about 260 F after the potatoes are added.

Gently stir the fries to ensure that they don’t stick to the bottom of the pan or stick to each other.  

Fry for about five minutes.

Remove from the oil using a pair of tongs or a slotted metal spoon.

At this point we’re only heating the potatoes, so don’t be disappointed if they’re not crisp yet.
Place the cooked potatoes on a paper towel lined plate.

 

Increase the heat to 400 degrees.

Fry a second time in batches about five more minutes, until they are crisp and golden-brown.

Remove them onto dry paper towels.
Sprinkle with salt as soon as they come out.
Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Making the Perfect Twice Baked Potatoes

There are times with a simple baked potato will not do, even how well dressed it might be.

You want something “extra”…you want to take what you’ve learned about Making the Perfect Baked Potatoes and turn them into something more…something a little fancier than regular baked potatoes.

The perfect twice-baked potatoes have crispy skins that are overflowing with creamy mashed potatoes and  covered with extra cheese and bacon.

Russet potatoes are the best choice for making twice baked potatoes because of their shape and size. The skins of Russet potatoes are sturdy enough to stay intact while you are hollowing them out and stuffing them.

 

 


Pre-heat oven to 400. Line a baking sheet with foil.

Bake your potatoes as explained in this post. I always make way more baked potatoes whenever I do make baked potatoes for making these and keeping stocked in my freezer for later…

Cut each potato in half lengthwise, Scoop out most of the inside of the potato, leaving a little bit so that the skins don’t crack or tear when you are working with them.

Hollow out each half, leaving a bit of a shell so the skins don’t break or crack.

Mash the insides, , as if you were making mashed potatoes. While you are making the mashed potatoes, you might want to stick the potato shells back in the oven to make them crispier.

Spoon the filling into the shells or snip off the corner of a freezer bag and pipe the filling into the shells.

Top with cheese, bacon and green onions.

Bake at 375 for 10-15min or until cheese is bubbly.

 

 

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Making Twice-Baked Potatoes Ahead of Time

You can save meal prep time during the week by baking, mashuing, and stuffing your potatoes. You can store them in your fridge in an air-tight container up to three days ahead….that way when prepping dinner on a work night all you have to do is simply warm the stuffed potatoes in the oven fot about 15min.

 

You can also keep twice baked potatoes on hand by freerzing them. After the potatoes have cooled, wrap each twice baked potato individually in aluminum foil and stick in the freezer.

Thaw your frozen twice baked potatoes by thawing them in the refrigerator overnight and then baking at 350 for 15-20 minutes.

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Making the Perfect Baked Potatoes

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Russet the Rascal

So let’s check our Mr. Potato Head and his fellow companions….actually the group has two different cliques—each based on the amount of  starch and water that they contain.

These groups are the following…

  • Starchy
  • All-purpose
  • Waxy

Let’s look at the characteristics of a starchy potato…

  • absorbent almost all of the butter and cream that you place on them…yum…
  • break down easily when cooked
  • don’t hold together very well when cooked
  • flesh coats your knife with a white, milky film when you cut into it

  • high in starch
  • low in moisture

The most common type of starchy potato is the russet potato, also known as an Idaho potato or Burbank potato.…russet potatoes are in fact the most common type of potato grown in the United States. Russet potatoes are the type of potato most people think of when they think about buying potatoes in the grocery store.

There are actually numerous varieties of russet potatoes. A few of their characteristics are…

  • brown
  • easily absorb butter and milk making them ideal for mashed or baked potatoes
  • just a few shallow eyes
  • light, fluffy texture
  • medium-to-large size
  • oblong or oval shaperough net-like skin that becomes chewy when cooked
  • white flesh

Cooking methods that are best for starchy potatoes include…

  • Baking
  • Deep Frying
  • Pan Frying
  • Roasting

These cooking methods create a crisp crust and keep the interior moist.

Starchy potatoes are not good for dishes that require the potatoes to hold their shape.—such as potato salads, soups, stews, and potatoes au gratin—because the flesh flakes and easily separates after cooking.

However, these potatoes are great for making…

  • baked potatoes
  • French fries
  • potato chips
  • gnocchi
  • mashed potatoes

So let’s start actually cooking by using the cooking method that we are currently talking about—deep frying—by frying up some potato chips and French fries..

 

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Mr. Potato Head and His Friends

When you mention the word potato, most of us automatically think of McDonald’s French fries that have been fried in tons of oil or a great big baked potato stuffed with butter, sour cream, cheese, bacon, the kitchen sink, and so on and so forth.
Yeah, I do realize that these are bad for you….But potato chips that have been baked with one of the healthier cooking oils can actually be both good for you and a great treat,
(Note…Don’t worry, I do realize that deep frying is definitely not the healthiest way to make homemade potato chips, so eventually we are going to learn how to make them in both the microwave and the oven….)
Potatoes actually contain many nutrients and minerals —such as potassium, Vitamin B6, Vitamin C, and  copper. A potato actually contains more potassium than a banana…half of the RDV of vitamin C…no fat, sodium, or cholesterol…
Potatoes contain very little to no fat.
One medium-sized, unadorned, skin-on potato contains just 110 calories per serving.
But for right now, let’s take a quick look at a few of the estimated two hundred varieties of potatoes sold in the United States…
These potatoes vary in texture and act differently when cooked. For example when you are making a pot of soup, your potato chunks will either remain intact, or disintegrate…depending on the type of starch and the amount of moisture in the flesh.not bless with too many ”
Because the result that you get depends on the amount of the starch contained in the potato, these varieties are typically broken down into three basic categories—:starchy, all-purpose and waxy.
In the next few posts we will be look at each of these different categories, but here are a few things to remember regardless which type of potato you are looking for…
Shopping…When you are shopping for potatoes, look for ones that are…
heavy
not green tinged
very firm
void of soft spots, cracks or cuts
without sprouts
Storing…Potatoes will last a few weeks when properly stored, but don’t refrigerate potatoes because this causes some of the starches to convert to sugars, giving them an odd flavor.
photo of pile of potatoes
Photo by Marco Antonio Victorino on Pexels.com
Creating a Home

Saving Money in the Kitchen

 Essential oils are great for diffusing and cleaning.
Cleaning with essential oils will help keep your home free of toxic chemicals and leave behind a fresh, clean scent.

It is important to remember that essential oils and green products can react with plastic, so always make and store your cleaning products in glass containers.

Also be sure to print and use cute and colorful labels to help you stay organized and know what each container contains.

Moving on ahead, here are a few essential oil recipes to help keep your kitchen cleaner…

 1. All Purpose Cleaner …Combine.1 gallon water, 2tsp Dawn dish soap, 1/2C vinegar, 1/2C baking soda. Put in a spray bottle to clean showers, toilets, sinks, counter-tops, and floors.

2. Dishwasher Detergent Tablets…Stir together 2C cups baking soda, 2C borax, 1/2C epsom salt,1/2C vinegar, and 20 drops of lemon essential oil. Transfer the mixture into a ice cube trays or silicone molds.

Press down until each compartment is hard packed with detergent. Put them in a dry, sunny spo and let them sit for at least 24 hours. Store in a container with a tight-fitting lid.

 

3. Disinfectant...Combine 1Tbsp witch hazel, 5 drops orange essential oil, 5 drops lavender essential oil,2 drops eucalyptus essential oil, 7 drops tea tree oil in 8oz spray bottle.Fill with 1C distilled or filtered water.
Shake well before each use. To use, spray on hard surface, such as counter-top and let air-dry.

4. Garbage Disposal Bombs…Mix 3/4C baking soda with 1/2C salt.

Slowly add 1Tbsp dish soap and 10 drops lemon essential oil. Scoop the mixture into Tablespoon-sized “cookies” onto tin foil or parchment paper. Let /dry 24 hours. To use, store in a jar by the sink and run a couple of bombs through the disposal as needed.

5. Room Spray...Combine 2tsp witch-hazel, 15 drops of lemon essential oil and 4oz water in a small, fine-mist spray bottle.

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Cruelty-Free and Vegan Dental Care Products Review—Don’t Forget to Floss

Like we just said in the previous post about using baking soda for dental care, it’s good…but alone it’s not great…

It’s still important that you brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, floss daily, and have regular dental checkups in order to keep your teeth healthy.

But in our quest to avoid chemical-containing products, what are we supposed to do?

First of all, check the labels of your dental care products for certain keywords—such as certain ingredients that you want to avoid and certain other ingredients that you are actually looking for.

As far as ingredients found in dental hygiene products, here are a few ingredients to avoid…

  • Artificial Colors, Flavors, Sweeteners
  • Benzoic Acid
  • BPA
  • Fluoride
  • Glycerin
  • Gluten
  • GMO
  • Parabens
  • Preservatives
  • Saccharin
  • SDS
  • SLS
  • Sorbitol
  • Sugar
  • Sulfate

As far as ingredients to look for, look for…

  • Aloe Vera...Aloe vera gently cleans the gums and soothes any irritation or infection which may be present
  • Baking Soda...This is used in many DIY types of mouthwash and toothpaste and is great for getting rid of stubborn plaque and also acts as a whitener for your teeth.
  • Cinnamon…Cinnamon freshens your breath and keeps the mouth clean.
  • Clove…Clove is used by dentists as a painkiller as it contains eugenol, and they will usually apply this to the teeth while pulling a tooth or applying a filling. As well as an anesthetic, it is also an antiseptic so wipes out germs.
  • Echinacea…Echinacea is a natural antiseptic that fights off nasty bacteria and prevents gum disease.
  • Grapefruit Extract…Grapefruit extract prevents tartar build up and bad breath.
  • Myrrh…Myrrh is used to help prevent bad breath, as well as providing a powerful soothing agents for any irritation or inflamed gum problems.
  • Pomegranate Extract….Pomegranate extracti helps prevent iplaque.
  • Peppermint…_Peppermint also provides a fresh, minty taste, fights halitosis, and prevent  bad breath.
  • Perilla Seed Extract…Perilla seed extract prevents  tartar build up and bad breath.
  • Spearmint…Besides from providing that fresh, minty taste we all know and love- these oils are great for fighting halitosis and preventing bad breath.
  • Tea Tree Oil…Tea tree oil acts as a natural antiseptic, fights harmful bacteria, and leads to a healthier smile.

Go beyond your ordinary toothpaste brands—such as Aquafresh, Colgate, Crest, Aim, Sensodyne—–that are not vegan or cruelty-free.

Instead look for other brands of toothpastes that actually are cruelty-free and vegan, such as…

  • David’s Natural
  • Dessert Essence
  • Dr. Bronner’s
  • Hello Oral Care
  • JASON
  • Nature’s Gate
  • Simply Sooney
  • Uncle Harry’s
  • VITA-MYR

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Mouthwash

Even though the most common toothpastes are not vegan, most mouthwashes are. Yet many of the most popular brands of mouthwash are owned by companies that do still test their products on animals.

Here is a list of available mouthwashes that do not have any link to animal testing and byproducts.

  1. Dale Audrey’s Oral Pulling Rinse…The active ingredients in this mouthwash are neem and myrrh, both natural antiseptics that help protect your teeth and prevent infections.
  2. Eco-Dent Ultimate Daily Rinse…The active ingredients in Eco-Dent Ultimate Daily Rinse are twelve different essential oils, echinacea is used as a natural antiseptic to fight off nasty bacteria and prevent gum disease., and baking soda.
  3. JĀSÖN Healthy Mouth® Tartar Control Cinnamon Clove Mouthwash…The active ingrefdients in this mouthwash are grapefruit and perilla seed extracts, both of which prevent  tartar build up and prevent bad breath….clove and cinnamon, both of which freshen your breath and keep the mouth clean….aloe vera, which gently cleans the gums and soothes any irritation or infection which may be present…tea tree oil, which acts as a natural antiseptic, fights harmful bacteria, and leads to a healthier smile.
  4. Eco-Dent Ultimate Daily Rinse…The active ingredients in Eco-Dent Ultimate Daily Rinse are twelve different essential oils, echinacea is used as a natural antiseptic to fight off nasty bacteria and prevent gum disease., and baking soda.

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Floss

Most dental flosses are not vegan for two reasons…first of all, many dental care products are tested on animals and therefore are not “cruelty-free”…secondly many brands of dental floss are coated with beeswax, which isn’t considered vegan because it’s made by exploiting honey bees.

Alternatives that are cruelty-free include…

  1. Eco-Dent…Mint, Cinnamon…No Beeswax, No Mineral Wax
  2. Nature’s Answer…Wintermint, Cool Mint, Cinnamint….Alcohol Free, SLS Free, Fluoride Free, Gluten Free, Soy Free, Perservative Free

RADIUS…Mint, Cranberry…Gluten Free, Paraben Free, non-GMO, No Artificial Colors, Sweeteners, Perservatives, Phthalates

 

 

 

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Activated Charcoal

Brushing with powdered charcoal supposedly pulls toxins from the mouth and removes stains from teeth.

 

 

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Kaolin Clay

 

Many prople claim that brushing with kaolin clay helps remove stains from teeth.

 

 

 

 

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Fruit Peels

Rubbing orange, lemon or banana peels on your teeth is claimed to make them whiter.

 

 

 

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Oil Pulling

Another technique that many people claim will remove toxins and bacteria—such as Streptococcus mutans, one of the primary types of bacteria in the mouth that cause plaque and gingivitis—and effectively fight plaque and gingivitis, and prevent your teeth from looking yellow is the traditional Indian folk remedy of oil pulling. 

To do this swish 1Tbsp of any type of oil—such as coconut, sunflower, sesame—around in your mouth for about fifteeen minutes.

This is safe enough to do daily because this does not expose your teeth to acid or other ingredients that erode the enamel.

 

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Apple Cider Vinegar

For centuries apple cider vinegar has been used as a disinfectant and natural cleaning product. because of its content of acetic acid, an ingredient that effectively kills bacteria.

Apple cider vinegar can also be useful for cleaning your mouth and whitening your teeth because of its bleaching effect.

To use it as a mouthwash, dilute it with water and swish it around in your mouth for several minutes. Then rinse your mouth with plain water.

But the acetic acid found in apple cider vinegar may soften the teeth and erode the enamel on your teeth.

So do not use apple cider vinegar only use this a few times per week, and limit the amount of time that the apple cider vinegar stays in contact with your teeth.

 


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Fruits and Vegetables

Finally many people claim that fruits and vegetables may be good for your teeth.

Eating crunchy, raw fruits and vegetables helps rub plaque away as you chew.

Not only that, but people claim that two certain fruits that can help whiten your teeth are strawberries and pineapple.

StrawberriesMany people claim that the malic acid found in strawberries removes discoloration on your teeth, exfoliates your teeth, and makes them appear whiter. To do this, smash up a fresh strawberry with some baking soda and brush the mixture on your teeth. Limit doing this to only a few times per week because.excessive use could cause damage.

Pineapple…Finally mane people claim that the bromelain, an enzyme found in pineapples, can whiten teeth.