Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Making the Perfect Cobbler

Other Ingredients

  • 3/4C sugar
  • 1-1/2C flour
  • 1-1/2tsp baking powder
  • 1-1/2C heavy cream
  • 1tsp vanilla
  • 1/2C butter, melted
  • 2Tbsp cornstarch
  • 1/4 tsp salt

 

 

 

 

 

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Making the Fruit Filling

Preheat oven to 350…(isn’t that what almost recipes tell you to preheat your oven to…just lately noticed this)…

Place a stick of butter into a 9×13 pan in the oven while the oven preheats….just make sure that you take the pan out so that the butter doesn’t burn.

Do whatever you need to do to get the fruit ready—such as wash, peel, stem, seed, slice, and so on.

You may need to cook some of the firmer foods—such as apples or peaches—before using them in your cobbler in order to bring out more of their juices. To do this, just stir together the fruit and a little bit of sugar in a pan. Cook on medium heat for just a few minutes, until the sugar dissolves.

Once you finish prepping the fruit, taste it to see if you need to add some sugar, spices (choose whatever you gut instinct tells you), or lemon juice.

If your fruit is juicy or you want your cobbler to be more firmly set, you may want to add some cornstarch.

Spread the fruit filling evenly into prepared pan. It should fill the dish three-quarters full…(almost like when Making the Perfect Muffins, right?!)

 

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Making the Topping

Mix together your dry ingredients—the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.

Cut in cold butter with a pastry cutter until pea-sized crumbs form.

Add the cream to the dry ingredients. Stir until just combined; the dough will be quite wet.

At this point, your topping should look like cookie dough.

Scoop the topping over the fruit mixture, using either a small ice cream scoop or a tablespoon.

Spread the topping out with a spoon or your fingers if you need to.

Sprinkle with coarse sugar or use an egg wash to give your cobber more sparkle and extra crunch.

 

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Baking the Cobbler

Bake for 45 to 55 minutes, until golden brown….(Just like with everything else that you  bake, stick a toothpick into the topping…if it comes out clean– it’s done.)

Once you have finished baking the cobber, set your oven on broil. Broil long enough to make it golden brown and slightly crunchy on top.

Serve warm with vanilla ice cream…(duh)…

Cover and store leftovers in the refrigerator for up to four days.

Baked cobbler can be kept frozen for up to three months. To serve, thaw overnight in the fridge. Warm in the oven before serving.

Satisfying the Sweet Tooth

National Peach Month

  
The month of August is National Peach month…a month to honor and enjoy the great flavor of juicy peaches. So…

1.  What exactly is a peach?

The peach (Prunus persica) is a deciduous tree native to China that bears an edible juicy fruit also called a peach.

The scientific name Persia, as well as any variations of the word “peach,”  came from the word “Persia” because peaches were thought to have originated in Persia, or modern Iran. The Romans called the peaches “Persian Apples,”naming them after the country that introduced peaches to the West.

The tree belongs to the family Rosaceae (the rose family), subfamily Prunoideae, genus Prunus, and subgenus Amygdalus (having a corrugated seed shell like an almond).

The fruit is a drupe, with a single reddish-brown, oval-shape, 1.5-2 cm long seed encased in hard wood. this seed may also be called the “stone” or the “pit.”

2.  What Is the True History Of The Peach?

Actually peaches originated in China, where they have been cultivated since 1000 BC. Today China remainsthe largest world producer of peaches.

Even today in modern China peaches have special significance and “mystical attributes,” such as the ability to bring luck, abundance and protection. Peaches also symbolize immortality and unity. Peach blossoms are carried by Chinese brides.

Peaches traveled west via the silk roads to Persia, earning them the botanical name Prunus persica. In Persia, peaches were discovered by Alexander the Great, who introduced peaches to the Greeks around 320 BC.

By 50 BC., Romans grew and sold peaches for the modern equivalent of $4.50. Once the Romans cultivated the fruit, they were able to transport it north and west to other countries of their European empire.


3.  Where are peaches grown, other than China?

Italy, particularly the regions of Campania and Emilia Romagna, is the second largest producer of peaches and the main exporter of peaches in the European Union; 

Spaniards brought peaches to South America and the French introduced them to Louisiana. The English took them to their Jamestown and Massachusetts colonies. Columbus brought peach trees to America on his second and third voyages.

In the United States, California produces more than half of the peaches grown…even though so many peaches are grown in Georgia that it became known as the Peach State.

4.  What are a few of the over 700 varieties of peaches?

  • Clingstone…the flesh sticks to the stone…generally used for canning
  • Donut…flat with rounded sides that draw in toward an indented center, like a doughnut without a hole…a descendant of the flat Chinese peach
  • Freestone…the flesh does not stick to the stone…the kind generally found in supermarkets. 
  • pêches de vigne...considered to be the finest peaches of all…small, red-fleshed…covered with grayish down…grown in vineyards in France and generally found only there
  • Saturn…a flat variety that resembles the rings of Saturn
  • White…typically sweeter and less acidic…most popular in China, Japan, and neighbouring Asian countries, 
  • Yellow…have an acidic tang coupled with sweetness… most popular kinds in Europe and North America

5.  How nutritious are peaches?

Peaches are a good source of vitamin A (11% RDA), vitamin B(10%), vitamin C (19% RDA), potassium (10% RDA), and fiber (3 grams, 10% RDA).

A medium peach contains only 37 calories. One large peach has only 68 calories.
  

Now for a few recipes…

     
Bellini

    

Peach Blueberry Parfait

      

      Peach Cheesecake

         
      Peach Cobbler

        
      Peach Melba

        
      Peach Pie

         
      Peach Slushie