Getting Healthy

Join Me for the Journey

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Because there isn’t necessarily one single type of “raw food diet” that must be strictly adhered to…but several different variations of a “raw foods diet” out there, all with different advice and degrees to which foods can be cooked…I have given myself permission to pick and choose exactly what I myself want to eat on a daily basis…(not that I didn’t obviously do that before now, but before now the main question that I would have asked the “resident four year old” would have been if he wanted chicken nuggets or a burger with those fries)…

 

The main guideline is that about seventy-five percent of the food that you eat should be uncooked.

As far as how much to eat, as long as you are eating raw and vegetarian foods,you can basically eat whatever you want, whenever you want.

 

Foods that can be technically included on a proper “raw foods diet” actually include far more than just fresh produce. Other options include fish, seaweed and other “sea vegetables,” fermented foods, sprouted grains, nuts, seeds, eggs, herbs, spices, beans, and perhaps even pasta, boiled eggs, and even some raw dairy products.

 

 

So instead of tackling one meal at a time or one diet at a time, I have decided to take a detailed look at the foods that make up what people call “The Raw Foods Pyramid,” starting with the lowest level on the pyramid and working my way up. Then based on that information, I will be better informed as to what my options are and what truly works best for myself and my family.

 

After all, changing your way of eating and/or your lifestyle in general—whether it be by switching to cruelty-free products or managing time more effectively or beginning new habits—is all about taking even the smallest step, only one step at a time—as long as that step is taken in the right direction.

Trying to completely change your diet overnight and thinking of developing better eating habits as a “quick-fix” solution will most sabotage your efforts. Introducing these higher-fiber, raw foods into your diet more slowly not only will make this transition easier, but also might mean that you experiencing fewer digestive problems and food cravings along the way.

So I have decided that, for our family at least, this “raw food diet” will become an important part of our overall diet on a long-term, not some short-term weight-loss…the main mission at the moment is to simply start gradually adding more and more nutritional foods to our Southern diet and lifestyle.

Soon I will do another “What Now” on Superfoods…what I learn about “raw foods” and then superfoods will hopefully also become a hinge on which to base our weekly menus and grocery lists based upon.

 

Anyway, I like the idea of adopting what many people refer to as the “80/20 raw diet,” which consists of eating “raw” 80% of the time and having cooked foods for the remaining 20%….(thanks goodness for that twenty, right?!)…

Join me for the journey, not only as I begin exploring the “Raw Foods Pyramid” layer by layer, but also as our family begins to…

 

1. Avoid foods that have been refined, pasteurized, homogenized, or produced with the use of synthetic pesticides, chemical fertilizers, industrial solvents, or chemical food additives.

 

2.  Choose better quality animal products, and eat them only in moderation…just like I now dowith craft beers.  Choosing better grades of meat and eating fewer of them will lower exposure to pesticides, herbicides, antibiotics and hormones…while at the same will supply important nutrients and fatty acids—such as arachidonic acid, conjugated linoleic acid and omega-3 fatty acids.

 

3.  Learn to cook smarter and more “delicately.” Where I’m from, most of our favorite foods are deep fried, and sometimes even in lard. Where I live now, our State Fair is quite famous for introducing a new fried food of choice each year—such as deep-fried Twinkies, deep-fried Oreos, and even deep-fried ice cream. So this year I will be taking time to learn not only how to “cook” food at temperatures less than 100 degrees, but also how to blend, dehydrate, soak, steam, juice, sprout and also use my slow cooker to its full potential.

 

4. Replace all unhealthy products such as sugary snacks, refined grains, pizza, canned soup, fruit drinks, canned foods, and sweetened yogurt…with healthier choices.

5.  Replace bad fats—such as any hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils, trans fats, soybean oil, canola oil and vegetable oils—with good, healthy fats—such as extra virgin olive oil, cold-pressed coconut oil, and grass-fed butter.

 

6.  Set up a healthy pantry and fridge…Other foods that I am considering on adding or keeping on the slate—or better yet in my fridge or in my pantry—include various types of sprouted seeds, cheese, fermented foods—such as yogurts, kefir, kombucha, kimchee, sauerkraut, nuts and nut butters, cold-pressed extra virgin olive or coconut oil, fresh herbs, freshly squeezed vegetable juices, fermented veggies, and herbal tea.

 

Join Me for the Journey!!!

Getting Healthy

But Can We Still Eat Bacon…and Eggs?!

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When I first told my spouse that I was going to pursue this “Raw Foods Diet” thing, his first question was…

“Will we still eat bacon?”

Where I’m from bacon reigns supreme…and men are hunters with Silverado pickups who buy their wives guns for each birthday and anniversary that rolls around.

Don’t worry, honey…we’ll still eat bacon…

Just not as much and not as often…

In fact, according to what I have read so far, studies have shown that strictly adhering to a raw foods diet can be even more detrimental than the typical American diet…or should we say “healthy” American diet, for several reasons. These reasons include…

1.  Lack of protein…Even though many plant-based foods do contain protein, these protein are not  considered to be “complete proteins” that supply all of the essential amino acids that the body cannot make on its own.

2.  Lack of critical vitamins and minerals—such as iron, vitamin B12, folate, zinc, and selenium.

These vitamins and minerals are all crucial for a vast variety of reasons. For example, iron prevents anemia and fatigue…Vitamin B12 benefits red blood cell formation and improves cellular function…folate is important for proper cellular functions and cellular division.

3.  Fatigue...Personally, I deal with having low energy and fatigue almost every single day…probably because I am a fifty year old woman going through menopause, while at the same time spending every waking hour chasing the “resident four year old.”  So a strictly vegan or vegetarian diet does not sound like a healthy option for me.

4.  Osteoperosis…Osteoperosis and arthritis runs rampant in my family, so I feel like I need to maintain as much muscle mass and bone strength as possible…another reason that I don’t think that a vegan or vegetarian diet would ever work for me.

So over the next month or two, I will be look at the different elements in a “raw foods diet” and trying to individualize the diet to a diet that works best for me and my family.

Getting Healthy

Why Next?!…Raw Foods Diet

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So why am I willing to set our Southern style of eating on hold for a while and pursue this raw foods thing in the first place? Wouldn’t anybody in their right mind be content to eat fried bacon, fried eggs, and gravy every single morning from now to eternity?

Actually, yes, I am “in my right mind”…I guess, or at least hope…but my husband was recently diagnosed as having diabetes…and we have got to eat healthier than before…than the way we were brought up…now that we have crossed that bridge that most Southern men find themselves crossing at some point in their lives…after years of eating like a true Southerner…

 

And the “Raw Foods” diet seems like a good place to start eating healthier…

In fact, there are many reasons to consider eating a Raw Foods diet, such as…

 

1. Chronic Disease/Conditions…A raw foods diet can help reduce your risk of getting certain chronic diseases and conditions—including cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and kidney disease, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, gallstones or gallbladder disease, and Parkinson’s disease.

2. Digestion...Cooked foods are usually harder to digest than raw foods, and can be less “frustrating” to your stomach and digestive tract…(more on this later).

3. Energy Level.…Eating a diet like this can increase your\ energy levels, and being a fifty year old chasing a “resident four year old” 24/7, Lord knows that I personally need that.

4.  Longevity...Increasing your intake of raw fruits and vegetables could lead to a longer life

5.  Osteoporosis...Raw foods have been proven to be great for preventing and treating osteoporosis, joint pain, muscle aches and pains, and headaches.

6.  Weight...Eating fewer processed foods and consuming fewer sugary drinks is always a good idea and can result in losing weight without supposedly even trying. Raw foods contain plenty of fiber, and fiber helps curb cravings and keeps you feeling full longer so that you end up eating less overall

 

 

 

Nutritional Value...Switching to a diet that focuses less on “lower quality foods”—such as dairy, tofu, eggs, fish, and meat…and focuses more on “higher quality foods” such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds…has important nutritional benefits. Eating this way, instead of settling for the typical American diet,  will mean that you will be getting less sodium, added sugars, fats, carbohydrates, processed and pasteurized foods, preservatives, and unhealthy chemical additives…while at the same time getting more antioxidants, magnesium, minerals, vitamins, natural enzymes, phytochemicals, fiber, and other nutrients that most Americans are deficient in.

 

And perhaps best of all…A “raw foods” might even make us smarter and able to remember stuff. Studies have shown that chewing stimulates those parts of the brain responsible for learning and memory,  puts you in a better mood, and improves both your alertness, as well as both your short-term and long-term attention spans….and chewing raw foods simply takes more effort than chewing cooked foods.

Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Nut Butters

Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla

Shopping for a nut butter can get overwhelming quickly. There are so many options—almond, peanut, cashew, sunflower, coconut, soy, walnut, multi-nut, hazelnut—and you want to make sure that you are choosing the best of the best.

Things to look for when shopping for a nut butter…

  1. Full Fat...reduced fat butters usually have a ton of sugar and other processed ingredients such as corn syrup solids to give the nut butter the “feel” of a full-fat version
  2. Little or no hydrogenated oils
  3. Low Salt Content
  4. Minimal Added Sugar
  5. No processed ingredients or stabilizers
  6. None of the following words on the label…these words all indicate that the nut butter has tons of added sugar and is more like a dessert—chocolate, flavored, honey/honey nut/honey roasted/honey flax, maple, nutella/hazelnut, vanilla
  7. Requires refrigeration…betters should NOT be able to sit out without going rancid.
  8. Requires stirring…nuts are primarily fat. When you grind them up and store them, the fat should separate from the ground up nuts….if not, some sort of palm oil or hydrogenated oil has been added.
  9. Short ingredients list…ingredients should literally just be whatever nuts are in the butter and salt

 

 

Almond Butters

Almonds are one of the most nutritious nuts…a great source of riboflavin, magnesium, manganese, vitamin E, flavonoids, healthy fats, calcium, B vitamins, copper, phosphorus, molybdenum, monounsaturated fats, fiber, and protein.

Almond butter can be a good choice for ensuring healthy metabolism, fighting heart disease and cancer, helping combat heart disease, and preventing osteoporosis.

Some of the healthiest almond butters available include…

  • Barney Butter Bare Almond Butter
  • Blue Mountain Organics Almond Butter
  • Dastony 100% Organic Stone-Ground Raw Almond Butter
  • Justin’s Classic Almond Butter
  • MaraNatha Raw Almond Butter or Organic Almond Butter
  • Trader Joe’s Creamy Almond Butter
  • Whole Foods 365 Organic Unsweetened Almond Butter

 

Peanut Butters

Peanut butter is obviously the most popular of all nut butters…a great source of B vitamins, copper, manganese, protein, molybdenum, phosphorus, and vitamin E.

Some of the healthiest peanut butters available include…

  • MaraNatha Organic Peanut Butter
  • Nutzo Original Peanut
  • Smucker’s Natural Peanut Butter
  • Smucker’s Organic Natural Peanut Butter
  • Santa Cruz Organics Peanut Butter
  • Trader Joe’s Organic Creamy Valencia Peanut Butter
  • Whole Foods 365 Organic Unsweetened Peanut Butter

 

Sun Butters...Sunflower seed butter, a great alternative for those with tree nut allergies, can provide even more fiber, magnesium and vitamin E than traditional nut butters…and are also a wonderful source of protein, B vitamins, folic acid, copper, manganese, selenium, phosphorus, healthy fats, and fiber. A great “sun butter” to try is MaraNatha Sunflower Seed Butter.