Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Meat and Taters Around the World, Post #1—France

Okay…I’ll admith…I have been on another of my tangents away from the main purpose of this blog—crawling my way up the Raw Foods Pyramid bit by bit—to taslking about such forbidden topics as deep frying and beef stew…

But potatoes are a vegetable, and vegetables are a major element of the Raw Foods Pyramid…

And deep frying is a cooking method…and another of our goals right now is to learn more about the dfifferent cooking methods…even though we are using the Raw Foods Pyramid as a guide…(don’t ask…just go with it).

Baeckeoffe is a hearty casserole or stew that consists of a simple mixture of lamb, beef, pork and potatoes that is typical in the French region of Alsace, which is situated on the border between Germany and France.

Legend has two reports of ho this dish originated…

First of all, many say that the housewives of this region made the dish on Mondays, the official designated “laundry day,”…(hey wait, lucky them, seems like every day around here is laundry day)… when they knew that they would have no time later that day to cook dinner and the took the dish to the baker who then sealed the pot with a flour-and-water paste and slow-baked in in the falling temperatures of his wood-fired oven after he finished baking his bread.

Others claim that the women would prepare this dish on Saturday evening and then leave it with the baker to cook on Sunday while they attended the typically lengthyLutheran church services of that day…(guess the Baptists and Methodists beat the Lutherans to Golden Carral and left them nothing on the buffet)…They would then pick up their casserole along with a loaf of bread on their way back from church…providing their family with a meal that was in line with the strict Lutheran rules of the Sabbath.

The term literally translates to the words “bake oven.”

The perfect baeckeoffe is a rich, warm, and aromatic casserole which containes the perfect combination of potatoes and vegetables, herbs, and perhaps marinated meat—such as pork, beef or mutton—that has been tightly sealed with a ring of dough, then simmered in the oven until juicy and tender.

 

Honestly this can be a rather time-consuming task…and actually a two-day ordeal…but it’s well worth it.
So here’s what to do on the day before…
Mix all your spices—such as garlic, bay leaves, juniper berries, thyme, parsley, 1-1/2tsp salt, and 1tsp pepper—with the white wine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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THE POTATOES

Wash and peel your potatoes. Slice about the thickness of a quarter or your thumb. Set the peeled and sliced potatoes in a bowl of cold water so that they will not turn brown.

 

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THE VEGGIES
Cut your veggies…
Artrichokes
Break the stems off and remove the hearts by using a very sharp knife to peel the bottom of the artichokes around the stem and then pullnug the large leaves away from the base of the artichoke. With the knife, remove the large leaves, slice the perimeter, and slice the small tender leaves above the choke. Remove these small leaves so that only the base of the artichoke remains and squeeze lemon juice on top to prevent browning.
Carrots
Peel and dice.

Herbs…such as fresh parsley, thyme, and rosemary
Rinse.
Leek
Trim and wash. Dice.
Lemon
Rinse in cold water. Remove the white part, keeping only the peel. Cut the peel into large squares. Bring the water and sugar to a boil, stirring until sugar is dissolved, to make a syrup. Place the squares of preserved lemon into the syrup and let them cook for 10 minutes. Remove and drain of excess syrup.
Onion
Chop into rings.
Tomatoes
Remove the stems. Cook the tomatoes in boiling saltwater for about fifteen seconds. Then peel, and cut them into quarters, removing and discarding the seeds.—such as onions, leeks, carrots—into small pieces. and
Combine these chopped veggies with your spices in a large bowl or very large Ziploc bag.
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THE MEAT
Cut the meat—your choice of beef, pork, pig’s feet, oxtail
You could also leave out the meat and make this a vegetarian-friendly dish if you’d like.or lamb—
into bite-sized pieces and add to the bowl or bag…(Plan on using about a third to a half pound of meat per person)…
MARINATING
Pour white wine over the top of the ingredients until covered.
Cover the bowl. R
Refrigerate overnight, stirring or flipping the bag over occasionally while marinating..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE LAYERS

Layer the ingredients into a 4″ deep Baeckoffe terrine,…oops…I forgot to pick one of those up the last time I went to Walmart, right?!)  in the following order…

  • potatoes…making sure each potato overlaps the last
  • ¼C of the vegetables
  • salt, pepper and parsley
  • 4oz meat

Repeat the layers one more time.

Then finish layering with potato and two tomato slices.

Pour wine to cover.

Salt and pepper every layer, especially the ones with the meat and the potatoes.

 

 

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THE SEAL

Now traditionally is the time to make the seal of dough to put around the edge of the dish. This helps to keep the aroma of the wine from escaping and the cooking liquid from evaporating.

To do this, mix together enough flour and water as necessary to form a firm dough.

Roll the dough out into a long rope….long enough to wrap around the casserole.

Place the lid of the casserole over the dish. Press the dough around the joint between the lid and the casserole…making sure it tightly joins the casserole dish and lid.

Brush the egg yolk over the dough.

You could also use a band of heavy aluminum foil…(much easier, right?!)

 

 

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Cooking

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cook for an hour.

Lower the oven temp to 300. Bake for an hour to an hour–and-half.

 

Place the sealed dish on the center rack of the oven. Cook for three hours.

Reduce the heat to 350 degrees. Cooki for 1-1/2 hours more.

Melt butter in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add the meat. Cook for about five minutes or until browned all over. Transfer to a bowl.

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SERVING
Serve from the same casserole dish that you baked it in…along with salad. a loaf of crusty bread, and the rest of the white wine that you used for making the marinade….assuming you still have some left and haven’t already downed it while cooking the dish

 

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Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Making the Perfect Homemade Potato Chips

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Mr. Potato Head’s Other Produce-Bin Buddies

So far we have looked at two types of potatoes—waxy potatoes such as the Russet, and all-purpose such as the Yukon Gold.
There are two more categories of potatoes that I would like to look at…waxy potatoes and sweet potatoes.
So what are the characteristics of a waxy potato?
  • fine-grained, dense flesh
  • generally smaller and rounder
  • high moisture level
  • high sugar content
  • hold their shape well during cooking
  • low in starch
  • more moisture
  • smoother texture
  • thinner skin

Waxy potatoes are best for boiling, steaming, frying,roasting, and making casseroles—such as potatoes au gratin and scalloped potatoes.

Let’s look at five different categories of waxy potatoes—fingerlings, new potatoes, red potatoes, purple potatoes, and yellow potatoes.

 

 

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1.Fingerlings…Fingerlings are basically an elongated variety of new potatoes.

  • Flesh…ranging from red orange to purple, yellow or white
  • Shape…thin, finger-like shape
  • Size…ranging from 2″ to 4″
  • Skin…thin, tender skin…colors ranging from red to orange to purple or white
  • Three varieties of fingerlings that you might find are…

LaRette

  • Flavor…nutty
  • Texture…silky

Red Thumb

  • Flesh…pink flesh
  • Skin…bright red skin

Rose Finn Apple

  • Skin…pink, often knobby skin
  • Flesh…golden buttery yellow
  • Flavor…earthy flavor

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2. New Potatoes

  • Technically, any potato picked before the height of maturity,, before its sugars have fully converted to starch.is a new potato.
  • Uses…Because new potatoes are so small, they are simply boiling whole and eating unpeeled…as in a roast…that food that we all probably hated growing up and absolutely love now that we have grown up ourselves…kinda like a rite of passage…
  • Shape…small and round
  • Skin…thin and tender..various colors
  • Taste…sweet,
  • Uses…boiling, steaming, roasting…not for baking….

 

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3. Purple Potatoes

Purple potatoes are named purple potatoes because why…gee, could it be their skin…since the other two varieties of potatoes that we will talk about are the white potato and the yellow potato…

A few of the characteristics of the purple potato…

  • Flavor…earthy, nutty flavor
  • Flesh…lavender
  • Skin…deep purple
  • Uses…grilling, roasting

One variety of purple potato that you might find available is the Purple Viking…

  • Flavor…meaty, slightly sweet and buttery
  • Flesh…white
  • Size…small
  • Skin…dark purple
  • Texture…creamy and moist texture.
  • Uses…roasting, boiling, casseroles and gratins…but not for soups….

 

 

 

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4. Red Potatoes,

Red potatoes are are typically small, smooth, and round,,,,and as you c an probably figure out, have a red skin.. These potatoes have  creamy moist texture and subtly sweet flavor.

These are the potatoes that you want to use whenever you are roasting, boiling, or steaming.

Three common varieties of new potatoes are…

  • Adirondack Red
  • Flavor…lightly sweet
  • Flesh…pink to red flesh that’s either opaque or in a starburst pattern
  • Skin…red
  • Texture…moist, meaty and waxy
  • Red Bliss
  • Flesh…creamy white
  • Skin…bright red
  • Taste…slightly bitter
  • Texture…firm, moist and waxy
  • Rose Gold
  • Skin… rose-red skin
  • Flesh…yellow
  • Taste…mild and earthy
  • Texture…firm and moist

 

 

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5. Yellow Potatoes

Our final category of potatoes is the yellow potato. Two types of yellow potato are…

  • Carola
  • Shape…oblong
  • Skin…yellow
  • Flesh…yellow
  • Flavor…strong, classic potato flavor with earthy and buttery notes
  • Texture…firm, creamy and waxy texture
  • Austrian Crescent
  • Skin…yellowish, tan smooth skin
  • Flesh…yellow flesh
Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Making the Perfect Mashed Potatoes

Mashed potatoes are to dinner fare what hash browns are to breakfast fare…and in this post, we’re gonna learn how to make the best mashed potatoes ever.

The perfect mashed potatoes are rich, super-creamy, and thick…and flavored with butter, sour cream, garlic and Parmesan cheese.

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Which type of potatoes should I use?

The best variety of  potato to use when making mashed potatoes is Yukon Gold….(that’s why I put mashed potatoes in this section on Yukon Gold potatoes…go figure)…because they give your mashed potatoes an even creamier texture….

 

 

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Should I Cut or Peel My Potatoes? 

First of all, whether or not you peel the potatoes before cutting them is purely a matter of preference. Some people like the texture that the skin adds,while other don’t…Just remember that the skin is where all the extra nutrients and flavor.s are.

Regardless if you peel them or not, you will need to cut your potatoes into evenly-sized chunks, about an inch or so thick.  You do not want to boil whole potatoes Now transfer the potatoes  to a large stockpot full of cold water until all of the potatoes are cut and ready to go.

 

 


How do I cook my potatoes?

Place the potatoes In a 6-quart stockpot, and cover with enough cold water that the water line sits about 1″ above the potatoes. Add 1Tbsp salt. You do not want to boil or heat the water before addiong the potatoes because they might not cook evenly.

Bring to a boil.

Reduce heat down to medium-low. Cook about 15min…until you can stick a knife into the middle of the potato with almost no resistance.

Draining and steaming to finish helps pull out any remaining water for a fluffy final texture. …Whether or not you cook them without peeling them first is a matter of personal preference.

So carefully drain out all of the water.

Return the drained potatoes into the hot stockpot. Set back on the stove over low heat.  Gently shake the pan for about a minute to release some of the steam and moisture from the potatoes.

Remove the pan from the heat.

Set them aside until you are actually ready to mash your potatoes….this will make sure that all the liquid is evaporated.

 

 

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Now what do I do?

Heat 1/3C salted butter, 1C milk, and 2tsp salt together either in a small saucepan or in the microwave until warm…but avoid boiling the milk.  Set aside until ready to use. This keeps the potatoes hot and absorbs better. 

Return the potatoes to the hot stockpot. Place back on the hot burner, but first turn the heat down to low.  Using two oven mitts, carefully hold the handles on the stockpot and shake it gently on the burner for about a minute to help cook off some of the remaining steam within the potatoes. 

Mash the potatoes with a potato masher, strong wooden spoon, or electric beaters until smooth, adding a little extra milk if needed…but be careful not to over beat or they will become gluey.

Add warm milk mixture, a little bit at a time, to the potatoes until they reach the desired consistency is reached.

Stir in 3 cloves garlic, Parmesan cheese, salt, pepper, 1/2C sour cream, fresh herbs, onion, shredded cheddar, cooked bacon bits, chives…whatever you want.

 

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Making the Perfect French Fries

Homemade French Fries…why even bother when it would be so much easier either to drive thru McDonald’s or grab a bag of frozen fries out of your freezer…the one that’s probably been hiding in there for the last couple of years at least…goal for today—clean out freezer!!!

Because we are talking about the deep frying cooking methods and potatoes, and of course the topic of French fries would eventually come up.

The perfect French fries are extra astonishingly crispy on the outside, creamy on the inside.

French fries are actually very easy to make ahead and store in your freezer that you may never buy another bag of frozen fries ever, ever again…

 

 


The Potatoes

Which potatoes?

  • Yukon Gold…that’s why we’re learning about making French fries while we are on the topic of Yukon Gold potatoes…go figure, right?
  • Choose the largest ones you can find.

Why are Yukon Gold potatoes better?

  • …because they are less starchy and will turn out much crispier than any other type of potato.

How many potatoes?

  • Figure on two potatoes per person.

How do I slice the potatoes?

  • Slice the potatoes into ½” thick sticks. The thinner you cut your fries, the crispier they will be.
  • Wash the potatoes.
  • Peeling them at this point is purely a matter of personal preference.

Soaking Your Potatoes

Soak the potato slices in cold water for at least one hour, perhaps even overnight. The longer, the better.

Soaking your potatoes removes the starch and will end up making your French fries extra crispy and keep them from sticking to each other when you are cooking them.

 

 

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Cooking Your French Fries

 

Most cooks and chefs agree that the best way to getting those perfectly crispy fries that you’re craving is to double fry your potatoes—first for five or six minutes at 300° to cook the middle of the potato, and then frying them a second time at 400° to cook the outside.

Using a deep-fat thermometer will help ensure that the oil is at the proper temperature before you start adding your potatoes to the water.

Drain the potatoes.. Pat them dry with paper towels or a clean dishcloth.

Be sure to use a pot that is large and tall enough—such as a tall 8-quart soup pot, to contain the oil without overflowing when the potatoes are slipped in.

Pour enough oil into the pan that it measures about 1-1/2″ deep.

Heat the oil over high heat until it reaches 300.

Carefully drop small batches of potatoes to the hot oil. Frying too many French fries at once makes them less crispy.

The oil should bubble lightly.  The temperature of the oil will drop to about 260 F after the potatoes are added.

Gently stir the fries to ensure that they don’t stick to the bottom of the pan or stick to each other.  

Fry for about five minutes.

Remove from the oil using a pair of tongs or a slotted metal spoon.

At this point we’re only heating the potatoes, so don’t be disappointed if they’re not crisp yet.
Place the cooked potatoes on a paper towel lined plate.

 

Increase the heat to 400 degrees.

Fry a second time in batches about five more minutes, until they are crisp and golden-brown.

Remove them onto dry paper towels.
Sprinkle with salt as soon as they come out.
Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Russet the Rascal

So let’s check our Mr. Potato Head and his fellow companions….actually the group has two different cliques—each based on the amount of  starch and water that they contain.

These groups are the following…

  • Starchy
  • All-purpose
  • Waxy

Let’s look at the characteristics of a starchy potato…

  • absorbent almost all of the butter and cream that you place on them…yum…
  • break down easily when cooked
  • don’t hold together very well when cooked
  • flesh coats your knife with a white, milky film when you cut into it

  • high in starch
  • low in moisture

The most common type of starchy potato is the russet potato, also known as an Idaho potato or Burbank potato.…russet potatoes are in fact the most common type of potato grown in the United States. Russet potatoes are the type of potato most people think of when they think about buying potatoes in the grocery store.

There are actually numerous varieties of russet potatoes. A few of their characteristics are…

  • brown
  • easily absorb butter and milk making them ideal for mashed or baked potatoes
  • just a few shallow eyes
  • light, fluffy texture
  • medium-to-large size
  • oblong or oval shaperough net-like skin that becomes chewy when cooked
  • white flesh

Cooking methods that are best for starchy potatoes include…

  • Baking
  • Deep Frying
  • Pan Frying
  • Roasting

These cooking methods create a crisp crust and keep the interior moist.

Starchy potatoes are not good for dishes that require the potatoes to hold their shape.—such as potato salads, soups, stews, and potatoes au gratin—because the flesh flakes and easily separates after cooking.

However, these potatoes are great for making…

  • baked potatoes
  • French fries
  • potato chips
  • gnocchi
  • mashed potatoes

So let’s start actually cooking by using the cooking method that we are currently talking about—deep frying—by frying up some potato chips and French fries..

 

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Mr. Potato Head and His Friends

When you mention the word potato, most of us automatically think of McDonald’s French fries that have been fried in tons of oil or a great big baked potato stuffed with butter, sour cream, cheese, bacon, the kitchen sink, and so on and so forth.
Yeah, I do realize that these are bad for you….But potato chips that have been baked with one of the healthier cooking oils can actually be both good for you and a great treat,
(Note…Don’t worry, I do realize that deep frying is definitely not the healthiest way to make homemade potato chips, so eventually we are going to learn how to make them in both the microwave and the oven….)
Potatoes actually contain many nutrients and minerals —such as potassium, Vitamin B6, Vitamin C, and  copper. A potato actually contains more potassium than a banana…half of the RDV of vitamin C…no fat, sodium, or cholesterol…
Potatoes contain very little to no fat.
One medium-sized, unadorned, skin-on potato contains just 110 calories per serving.
But for right now, let’s take a quick look at a few of the estimated two hundred varieties of potatoes sold in the United States…
These potatoes vary in texture and act differently when cooked. For example when you are making a pot of soup, your potato chunks will either remain intact, or disintegrate…depending on the type of starch and the amount of moisture in the flesh.not bless with too many ”
Because the result that you get depends on the amount of the starch contained in the potato, these varieties are typically broken down into three basic categories—:starchy, all-purpose and waxy.
In the next few posts we will be look at each of these different categories, but here are a few things to remember regardless which type of potato you are looking for…
Shopping…When you are shopping for potatoes, look for ones that are…
heavy
not green tinged
very firm
void of soft spots, cracks or cuts
without sprouts
Storing…Potatoes will last a few weeks when properly stored, but don’t refrigerate potatoes because this causes some of the starches to convert to sugars, giving them an odd flavor.
photo of pile of potatoes
Photo by Marco Antonio Victorino on Pexels.com
Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Cruelty-Free and Vegan Dental Care Products Review—Don’t Forget to Floss

Like we just said in the previous post about using baking soda for dental care, it’s good…but alone it’s not great…

It’s still important that you brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, floss daily, and have regular dental checkups in order to keep your teeth healthy.

But in our quest to avoid chemical-containing products, what are we supposed to do?

First of all, check the labels of your dental care products for certain keywords—such as certain ingredients that you want to avoid and certain other ingredients that you are actually looking for.

As far as ingredients found in dental hygiene products, here are a few ingredients to avoid…

  • Artificial Colors, Flavors, Sweeteners
  • Benzoic Acid
  • BPA
  • Fluoride
  • Glycerin
  • Gluten
  • GMO
  • Parabens
  • Preservatives
  • Saccharin
  • SDS
  • SLS
  • Sorbitol
  • Sugar
  • Sulfate

As far as ingredients to look for, look for…

  • Aloe Vera...Aloe vera gently cleans the gums and soothes any irritation or infection which may be present
  • Baking Soda...This is used in many DIY types of mouthwash and toothpaste and is great for getting rid of stubborn plaque and also acts as a whitener for your teeth.
  • Cinnamon…Cinnamon freshens your breath and keeps the mouth clean.
  • Clove…Clove is used by dentists as a painkiller as it contains eugenol, and they will usually apply this to the teeth while pulling a tooth or applying a filling. As well as an anesthetic, it is also an antiseptic so wipes out germs.
  • Echinacea…Echinacea is a natural antiseptic that fights off nasty bacteria and prevents gum disease.
  • Grapefruit Extract…Grapefruit extract prevents tartar build up and bad breath.
  • Myrrh…Myrrh is used to help prevent bad breath, as well as providing a powerful soothing agents for any irritation or inflamed gum problems.
  • Pomegranate Extract….Pomegranate extracti helps prevent iplaque.
  • Peppermint…_Peppermint also provides a fresh, minty taste, fights halitosis, and prevent  bad breath.
  • Perilla Seed Extract…Perilla seed extract prevents  tartar build up and bad breath.
  • Spearmint…Besides from providing that fresh, minty taste we all know and love- these oils are great for fighting halitosis and preventing bad breath.
  • Tea Tree Oil…Tea tree oil acts as a natural antiseptic, fights harmful bacteria, and leads to a healthier smile.

Go beyond your ordinary toothpaste brands—such as Aquafresh, Colgate, Crest, Aim, Sensodyne—–that are not vegan or cruelty-free.

Instead look for other brands of toothpastes that actually are cruelty-free and vegan, such as…

  • David’s Natural
  • Dessert Essence
  • Dr. Bronner’s
  • Hello Oral Care
  • JASON
  • Nature’s Gate
  • Simply Sooney
  • Uncle Harry’s
  • VITA-MYR

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Mouthwash

Even though the most common toothpastes are not vegan, most mouthwashes are. Yet many of the most popular brands of mouthwash are owned by companies that do still test their products on animals.

Here is a list of available mouthwashes that do not have any link to animal testing and byproducts.

  1. Dale Audrey’s Oral Pulling Rinse…The active ingredients in this mouthwash are neem and myrrh, both natural antiseptics that help protect your teeth and prevent infections.
  2. Eco-Dent Ultimate Daily Rinse…The active ingredients in Eco-Dent Ultimate Daily Rinse are twelve different essential oils, echinacea is used as a natural antiseptic to fight off nasty bacteria and prevent gum disease., and baking soda.
  3. JĀSÖN Healthy Mouth® Tartar Control Cinnamon Clove Mouthwash…The active ingrefdients in this mouthwash are grapefruit and perilla seed extracts, both of which prevent  tartar build up and prevent bad breath….clove and cinnamon, both of which freshen your breath and keep the mouth clean….aloe vera, which gently cleans the gums and soothes any irritation or infection which may be present…tea tree oil, which acts as a natural antiseptic, fights harmful bacteria, and leads to a healthier smile.
  4. Eco-Dent Ultimate Daily Rinse…The active ingredients in Eco-Dent Ultimate Daily Rinse are twelve different essential oils, echinacea is used as a natural antiseptic to fight off nasty bacteria and prevent gum disease., and baking soda.

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Floss

Most dental flosses are not vegan for two reasons…first of all, many dental care products are tested on animals and therefore are not “cruelty-free”…secondly many brands of dental floss are coated with beeswax, which isn’t considered vegan because it’s made by exploiting honey bees.

Alternatives that are cruelty-free include…

  1. Eco-Dent…Mint, Cinnamon…No Beeswax, No Mineral Wax
  2. Nature’s Answer…Wintermint, Cool Mint, Cinnamint….Alcohol Free, SLS Free, Fluoride Free, Gluten Free, Soy Free, Perservative Free

RADIUS…Mint, Cranberry…Gluten Free, Paraben Free, non-GMO, No Artificial Colors, Sweeteners, Perservatives, Phthalates

 

 

 

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Activated Charcoal

Brushing with powdered charcoal supposedly pulls toxins from the mouth and removes stains from teeth.

 

 

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Kaolin Clay

 

Many prople claim that brushing with kaolin clay helps remove stains from teeth.

 

 

 

 

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Fruit Peels

Rubbing orange, lemon or banana peels on your teeth is claimed to make them whiter.

 

 

 

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Oil Pulling

Another technique that many people claim will remove toxins and bacteria—such as Streptococcus mutans, one of the primary types of bacteria in the mouth that cause plaque and gingivitis—and effectively fight plaque and gingivitis, and prevent your teeth from looking yellow is the traditional Indian folk remedy of oil pulling. 

To do this swish 1Tbsp of any type of oil—such as coconut, sunflower, sesame—around in your mouth for about fifteeen minutes.

This is safe enough to do daily because this does not expose your teeth to acid or other ingredients that erode the enamel.

 

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Apple Cider Vinegar

For centuries apple cider vinegar has been used as a disinfectant and natural cleaning product. because of its content of acetic acid, an ingredient that effectively kills bacteria.

Apple cider vinegar can also be useful for cleaning your mouth and whitening your teeth because of its bleaching effect.

To use it as a mouthwash, dilute it with water and swish it around in your mouth for several minutes. Then rinse your mouth with plain water.

But the acetic acid found in apple cider vinegar may soften the teeth and erode the enamel on your teeth.

So do not use apple cider vinegar only use this a few times per week, and limit the amount of time that the apple cider vinegar stays in contact with your teeth.

 


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Fruits and Vegetables

Finally many people claim that fruits and vegetables may be good for your teeth.

Eating crunchy, raw fruits and vegetables helps rub plaque away as you chew.

Not only that, but people claim that two certain fruits that can help whiten your teeth are strawberries and pineapple.

StrawberriesMany people claim that the malic acid found in strawberries removes discoloration on your teeth, exfoliates your teeth, and makes them appear whiter. To do this, smash up a fresh strawberry with some baking soda and brush the mixture on your teeth. Limit doing this to only a few times per week because.excessive use could cause damage.

Pineapple…Finally mane people claim that the bromelain, an enzyme found in pineapples, can whiten teeth.

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Baking Soda and Skincare

Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Book Review…Essential Glow

Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla

Essential Glow: Recipes & Tips for Using Essential Oils is an all-inclusive guide to natural beauty written for people who would like to learn how to use essential oils in their daily lives to boost their beauty, home, and general wellness.

This book sparked my interest because I am just now starting to use essential oils in my home now that I have started this journey to a happier and healthier lifestyle.

The title, Essential Glow, is appropriate for the book because the book was written by the same people who host the popular Hello Glow website—the ultimate source for daily inspiration, recipes, projects, and tips for living a healthy, mindful life and learning more about natural beauty and wellness.

The author of the book is Stephanie Gerber, a Nashville-based natural living blogger, who has also written…Stephanie Gerber says that she believes that “the journey to well-being can and should be, simple and beautiful, natural and stylish.”

The book is filled with over two hundred simple recipes and tutorials for making organic skincare and haircare-products, household cleaners, and even cosmetics at home…all using essential oils…including recipes for laundry softeners, all purpose cleaners, steam tablets, masks, bath oils, and invigorating scrubs.