Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Making the Perfect Baked Cod

Ever since my husband was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, I have tried not only to add antioxidants to our diet, but also choose foods that supposedly are diabetic-friendly.

The perfect baked cod is has a mild taste and is smothered with with the perfect amounts of butter and lemon juice,

 

 

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Ingredients

  • ¼C melted butter
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon minced parsley
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • 4 slices lemon
  • 4 portions cod fish
  • 2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 1 teaspoon basil

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Prepping to Cook

Preheat oven to 400. Lightly grease a baking dish.

 

 

 

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Seasoning the Fish

Combine melted butter, Parmesan, flour, garlic, basil,  onion powder, Dijon mustard, and lemon juice in a bowl.

In another bowl combine flour, spices, salt and pepper.
Pat fish fillet dry.

 

Dip fish in the lemon juice mixture…and then in the flour mixture.

Shake off excess flour.
Lay fish in prepared dish.
Top each piece of fish with a slice of lemon,

 

 

 

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Baking the Fish

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Fish…The Why

 

Fish is a great source of the important vitamins—such as…

Vitamins

  • B-complex vitamins—niacin, B12, B6…which have been associated with healthy development of the nervous system
  • Vitamin A…which is needed for healthy vision as well as for healthy skin
  • Vitamin D…which is essential in the calcium absorption needed for bone health and growth

Minerals

  • Calcium…which is needed for bone development.
  • Iodine…which helps maintain thyroid gland function
  • Iron…which is important in red blood cell production
  • Zinc…which is needed for cell growth and immune system health

Omega-3s which…

  • alleviate the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis
  • halt mental decline in older people
  • help ease movement by the body, reduce your risk of heart disease, and strengthen the mind
  • reduce depression, the risk of heart disease, and tissue inflammation
  • regulate blood flow
  • keep our heart and brain healthy

In fact, the healthiest fish are those that contain the most omega-3—such as salmon, trout, sardines, tuna steak, mackerel, and herring.

Fish has been shown to have all sorts of awesome benefits for you as far as health goes…

So let’s find out the facts about how fish can make a difference to your health…

 

 

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Brain

Eating fish regularly can keep you smarter, longer…keeping your brain from slowing down as fast as it would had you not been eating fish regularly.

Fish does this by helping you maintain the grey matter in the brain, the tissue in our brains that contain the neurons in charge of processing information, storing memories, and regulating emotion and memory,

This will lower your chance of getting such brain malfunctions as Alzheimer’s disease.

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Depression

The omega 3 fatty acids found in fish can help improve symptoms of depression and increase the effectiveness of antidepressant medications.

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Heart

 

Fish is also great for your heart and circulatory system. In fact, eating fish regularly can reduce your risk of heart attacks, strokes, and death from heart disease by 36% by…

    • decreasing your risk of abnormal heartbeats
    • helping to lower  “bad,” cholesterol levels
    • improving blood vessel function
    • lowering cholesterol-building lipids in the blood
    • lowering triglycerides
    • lowering your blood pressure
    • lowering your heart rate
    • slowing down the growth rate of atherosclerotic plaque

 

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Insomnia

Eating fatty fish—such as salmon and herring—can improve both sleep and daily functioning because of its vitamin D content. One serving of cooked salmon contains the recommended amount of intake of vitamin D per week.

 

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Vision

Finally, eating fish regularly can help you maintain your vision by strengthening the retina…which in turn prevents age-related macular degeneration, one of the leading causes of vision impairment and blindness among people age 50 and older, by as much as 53%.

 

….The American Heart Association also recommends increasing the intake of Omega-3 through diet with food rather than supplements

….The American Heart Association also recommends increasing the intake of Omega-3 through diet with food rather than supplements

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Fish…The What

  1. Fish is another food high in antioxidants and other nutritional value, but it’s so easy to feel overwhelmed at the fish counter.

    You want to buy the tastiest, healthiest, and most sustainable choice…but truth is, they all look the same to the normal grocery shopper, right?!

    First we’re going to take a look at the types of fish typically found in a large grocery store.

    Then we’re going to look at the nutritional value of fish.

    And finally some recipes to make with each option…

    So let’s get started…

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    Catfish
    Being from Mississippi, I grew up eating catfish at least twice a month…since most of the catfish sold in the United States are farmed in the Mississippi Delta.
    But this was typically “wild” catfish, which often has a more muddy and stronger flavor than farmed catfish.
    Best for…sautéing or frying

     

     

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    Cod

    Cod has a mild flavor, making it great for a variety of cooking methods—such as sautéing, poaching, steaming, and baking.

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    Haddock
    Haddock…firm, mild flesh that is especially popular in Scotland….and is best for frying and deep frying—(fish n chips, go figure)…

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Halibut

Halibut is typically cut into filets that are firm, meaty, and mild with a low fat content….best for baking.

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Salmon

There are two different types of salmon—Atlantic and Pacific. You will usually find Atlantic salmon at your local grocery store because it is farmed and is available year-round. Atlantic salmon has a meaty texture and mild flavor that is best for grilling, roasting, or broiling.

Pacific salmon—such as sockeye or king salmon—are caught in the wild….making fresh Pacific salmon only available between late spring and early fall (although frozen can be found year-round). Pacific salmon has a stronger flavor than Atlantic salmon and is best for grilling, broiling, or roasting.

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Snapper

Typically you will only find red snapper when you are shopping for snapper…even though there are many different types of snapper that have not been recognized by the FDA.

Snapper can be served either whole or as filets. Be careful when ordering snapper at a restaurant, it will probably be served tail and perhaps head in tow.

Snapper is best for roasting or grilling.

 

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Swordfish

Fresh swordfish is available fresh and typically sold in steaks. It has a slightly sweet flavor and meaty texture that is best for grilling.

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Tilapia

Tilapia has an oily texture and muddy flavor that is bland enough that even those who hate the taste of fish can endure.

Tilapia is best for baking, braising, or poaching.

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Tuna

Most of us have been eating canned tuna since we were born…so I really don’t feel a need to elaborate here.

But it was only recently that I cooked a tuna steak…and man, oh man…ditch the can…

Tuna steaks are typically cooked by either grilling or pan frying.

 

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Making the Perfect Beer-Battered Fish

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Prep

Preheat your oven to 250°F so that you can keep the food warm while you ffinish yout batches.

Set two cooling racks over two rimmed baking sheets; these will ensure that your beer-battered food drains a bit and isn’t too oily.

Set two cooling racks over two rimmed baking sheets; these will ensure that your beer-battered food drains a bit and isn’t too oily.

Prepare a paper-towel lined baking sheet or cooling rack for the food to drain off excess oil while cooling.

Heat your oil to 375ºF., preferably in a large cast iron skillet. Canola oil and peanut oil have the highest smoking point, meaning that you have less chance of burning the oil if it gets too hot.

Blot the fish with paper towels to dry them.

Season on both sides with salt and pepper.

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Dredge

Dredge the fish in the flour and shake off the excess.

Let sit for thirty minutes. to activates the batter and help it puff up when it fries.

 

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Make Your Batter

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Fry

Fry the fish for about five minutes…until nicely golden.Watch the temperature of the oil carefully.  If the temperature is too low, you’ll end up with greasy fish. If the temperature is too high, the outside will cook before the inside is done.

Remove the fish with a slotted spoon or tongs.

Place the fish on paper towels for a minute to help drain off any excess oil.

Serve immediately. If you do have to wait, keep the fish warm in the oven at the lowest temp possible until ready to serve.

Like frying anything else, use a thermometer to make sure that the oil is hot enough….and avoid crowding the pot.

 

The fish is done when it turns a golden brown color and bubbles start floating near the top of the oil,.

 

Lasting Through Lunch

On the Lunch Menu Today…Baked Fish Filet Sandwiches…Better Than McDonald’s

  

Baked Crispy Fish Sandwiches

  • Tartar Sauce…1/2C mayonnaise, 3Tbsp pickled relish, 1Tbsp chopped fresh dill, 1Tbsp Dijon mustard, Dash hot sauce
  • 1Tbsp olive oil or butter
  • 1-1/4C panko breadcrumbs
  • 1 pound white fish (halibut, tilapia, cod, etc.)
  • 1tsp salt
  • 1/2tsp pepper
  • 1/2C mayonnaise
  • 1C all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 to 1-1/2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • Hamburger or potato buns, split
  • 4 slices of American or cheddar cheese
  • 2 medium tomatoes, sliced into rounds (optional)
  • Shredded lettuce

    1.  Prep…Preheat oven to 425°F. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. Heat just the baking sheet for 30 minutes.Remove pan from oven.  Drizzle with oil.

    2.  Make the tartar sauce...Stir together 1/2C mayonnaise, relish, dill, mustard, and hot sauce together in a small bowl. Cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate.

    3.  Toast the panko…Heat the oil or butter in a large frying pan over medium heat until shimmering or melted. Add the panko and 1/4tsp salt. Toast, stirring frequently, until evenly light golden-brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer toasted panel to a pie dish or large shallow plate. Let cool completely. 

    4. Bread the fish…Cut the fish fillets as needed into pieces that will fit in the buns. Mix the toasted panko, flour, salt, pepper, and garlic powder in a pie plate. Whisk the egg and milk together in a shallow dish. Dip the tilapia in the egg mixture, allowing any extra to drip off. Dredge in the toasted panko mixture to completely coat, shaking off any extra. Use your hands to press the crumbs into the fish as needed. Place on the heated baking sheet. Drizzle fish with a little vegetable oil.

    5.  Bake the fish…Bake until the fish is golden-brown and flaky, 12 to 14 minutes, depending on the thickness of the fish. 

    6.  Make the sandwiches…Lightly toast the rolls cut-side up directly on the oven rack, about 3 minutes. Top each piece of fish with a slice of cheese. Return them to the oven until the cheese melts. Spread the tartar sauce on the cut sides of both the tops and bottoms of the rolls. Place some lettuce on the bottom half of each roll.  Top with the fish, and top half of the roll.