Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Why We Should All Be Drinking Water Everyday

 

What if I were to tell you that there is one “food” that has no calories, fat, carbohydrates or sugar….a “food” that if consumed adequately and regularly can provide numerous health benefits and can prevent or help treat many health problems—including fatigue, headaches, feeling irritable or anxious, constipation and other digestive disorders, insomnia, asthma, allergies, constipation, high blood pressure, diabetes, and autoimmune disorders.

That one “food” that would most help us maintain and improve our health that most would be…

Water

Yet even though this “magic potion” is cheap, readily available, and perhaps even better, helps us lose weight, many of us often overlook the importance of drinking enough water each day.

Many of us assume that we will get enough water from the foods that we eat, but this is not the case. On even the “healthier” diet that you can consume—a diet that consists mainly of whole, fresh foods—you only will get up to 20% of the water that you need each day. On the typical American diet—a diet that consists mainly of processed foods and sugary soda—you won’t even get that much.

Also factor in the fact that those sugar sodas—as well as many other drinks that we drink during the day such as alcohol, coffee, and tea—actually take away from the amount of water that your body needs and negate any benefits that would be available from having the appropriate amount of water available for the various body systems to function.

 

Reaons to Drink Water

1.Asthma and Allergies…Water  is important in keeping your air passages open, very important for those of us with asthma and allergies. Whenever you are dehydrated, the body closes up these passageways in an effort to minimize water loss. This can make asthma and allergies worse.

2.Blood Pressure…Water is important in preventing your blood from becoming so thick that it increases your blood pressure.

3. Body Temperature…Water is important in cooling the body whenever you sweat. Water is stored in the middle layers of the skin. Whenever you sweat, this water comes to the surface of the skin. As this water evaporates, it cools the body.

4. Body Waste…Water is important in removing both urine and feces.

5. Brain Function…Water is important in protecting brain structure and function, as well as producting hormones and neurotransmitters. Drinking water promotes clearer thinking and reasoning.

6. Constipation…Drinking water, especially carbonated water, is important in both preventing and relieving constipation.

7. Exercise…Drinking water is important while you are exercising for many reasons—such as maintaining appropriate body temperature, staying motivated, keeping you from getting tired as quickly, and keeping you on top of your game both physically and mentally.

8. Headaches…Drinking water can sometimes relieve the intensity and duration of headaches.

9. Hangovers…Drinking water can help prevent the unpleasant symptoms experienced after drinking alcohol—such as thirst, fatigue, headache and dry mouth. These symptoms are a result of your becoming dehydrated from drinking too much alcohol, which is a diuretic.

10. Joint Pain…Drinking water maintains the ability of the joints to absorb shock and prevents joint pain.

11. Kidney Stones…Drinking water makes you have to pee more often, which prevents minerals from consolidating, crystallizing and becoming kidney stones.

12. Skin…Drinking water is important for maintaining healthy, clearer skin. Water is also important in preventing skin disorders and premature wrinkling…as well as making your skin look healthy and vibrant and preventing it from becoming dry, flaky and tight.

13. Tooth Decay…Drinking water keeps the mouth clean and as a result reduces tooth decay.

14. Weight Loss…Drinking water can help you lose weight by reducing your appetite and making you burn more calories.. Drink water instead of calorie-laden juices and sodas. Drink water thirty minutes before meals to make you feel full more quickly and keep you from overeating. Drink cold water, instead of lukewarm, so that your body will have to use more calories to heat the water to body temperature.

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Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Honey—The Why?!

Now for the most important question about monofloral honey—or at least to me and my family at this time as we rethink our diet and learn more about nutrition…

Do we add/keep monofloral honey on our Grocery IQ app or not?!

Just like I did in previous posts on why we should all be eating avocadoes and blackstrap molasses, let’s look at the nutritional benefits of honey in a way that corresponds to the nutrition labels.

  1. Serving Size…Honestly how much honey you eat at one time is totally up to you—how sticky do you want your toast to be—how sweet do you want your hot tea to be…but for our purpose, we’re gonna look at the nutritional value of 1Tbsp.
  2. Calories…Each tablespoon of honey contains about sixty-five calories.
  3. Basic Nutrients…Now as for those specific nutrients contained in monofloral honey—such as carbohydrates, fat, protein, cholesterol, sodium, and sugar—that all of us typically eat in adequate amounts….honey contains little fat (zero grams), dietary fiber (.2grams), or protein(.3grams).
  4. Vitamins and Minerals…Monofloral honey actually contains very few vitamins and minerals, but let’s take a look at how much honey does contain…
    • Folate (B9)…1%…2 μg
    • Iron…3%…0.42 mg
    • Calcium…1%…6 mg
    • Magnesium…1%…2 mg
    • Niacin (B3)…1%… 0.121 mg
    • Pantothenic acid (B5)…1%…0.068 mg
    • Phosphorus…1%…4 mg
    • Potassium…1%…52 mg
    • Riboflavin (B2)…3%…0.038 mg
    • Sodium…0%…4 mg
    • Vitamin B6…2%…0.024 mg
    • Vitamin C…1%…0.5 mg
    • Zinc…2%…0.22 mg

There are benefits of honey in general—such as being a natural antibacterial, antifungal, antiseptic and antibiotic—but monofloral honey not only provide these benefits, but also many other benefits and unique properties that make them even more beneficial.

These benefits are related to the following conditions…

    1. Acid reflux…Monofloral honey can help reverse acid reflux damage.
    2. Infection…Monofloral honey often contain strong antibacterial elements—such as hydrogen peroxide and antioxidants.
    3. Cancer…Monofloral honey controls the side effects of radiation therapy or chemotherapy.
    4. Digestive conditions…Monofloral honeys are good for stomach health. They  have prebiotic benefits that help to improves digestive health, such as helping to soothe an upset stomach or constipation. These honeys can also encourage the stomach to regenerate itself, helping heal gastritis naturally.
    5. Fatigue…Monofloral honeys can give you more energy and help you combats fatigue and hypoglycemia.
    6. Immunity…Monofloral honeys, especially those produced from local sources, make your immune system more effective.
    7. Respiratory conditions…Monofloral honey helps you recover from respiratory infections more quickly, as well as helping you deal with seasonal allergies due to pollen.
    8. Skin conditions…Monofloral honeys are good for all skin types. They help prevent acne by reducing bacteria and the excess sebum that these bacteria feed on and by calming skin irritation. As far as dry skin, monofloral honey nourishes, hydrates, and restores radiance.
    9. Sleep…Monofloral honeys can help you fall asleep faster.
    10. Sore throat…Monofloral honey is good for sore throat and cough, common cold and tonsillitis.
Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

The Essentials about Essential Oils

Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla
Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla is a member of the Aster Family, Asteraceae or Compositae, the dried flowewrs of which are one of the most well-known herbal teas of commerece, valued for flavor, mild anti-inflammatory activity, and a calming effect.

Essential oils are perhaps the oldest known element in following a “natural health” regimen…dating back to the ancient Egyptians, who seem to have used them as far back as 3500BC for religious, cosmetic, and health purposes.

Essential oils have been called the “life blood” of the plant and are typically extracted from within the many shrubs, flowers, trees, roots, bushes and seeds in which they are found through the process of steam distillation. These essential oils have been used for both physical and emotional benefits for thousands of years.

Each person will respond to the aroma, or these specific chemical elements, when breathing in the scent of an essential oil, in his or her own unique way…based on individual emotions, behaviors, memories, and experiences.

That being said, certain essential oils are always considered to have a certain effect regardless of these factors. Certain oils simply almost always seem more uplifting, more invigorating, more calming, more soothing….

In a future post, I will be sharing a list of the best essential oils to use when fighting insomnia.

 

But what good is that list of essential oils and a brand new vial of essential oil…if you’re like I was the first time that I purchased essential oil. It sat in my bathroom for years before I finally gave it away to my daughter because I had no clue what to do with it…(okay, did I just admit that?!)

Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla
Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla is a member of the Aster Family, Asteraceae or Compositae, the dried flowewrs of which are one of the most well-known herbal teas of commerece, valued for flavor, mild anti-inflammatory activity, and a calming effect.

Essential oils can have a huge positive influence on us both physically and psychologically.

Physically, using essential oils aromatically can help heal and maintain the respiratory system by improving the quality of the air we are breathing and protecting us from environmental threats…

Psychologically, using essential oils aromatically can help control moods, tension, and stress.

But first, how and why do essential oils work aromatically?

When you inhale essential oils, you are actually breathing in a fine mist or vapor of the actual oil. This vapor contains all the same properties of the actual liquid oil itself, just in a different format.

Once you have inhaled the vapor, the scent of the essential oil interacts with smell receptors located in the brain, known as “olfactory sensors.”

These “olfactory sensors” are part of the “olfactory system,” the part of the brain that regulates our sense of smell. The “olfactory system” part of the brain is located near and closely connected to the limbic system.

Once the scent is processed by the olfactory system, it travels through the olfactory nerve to the limbic system.

The “limbic system” is the part of the brain responsible for processing smell, emotions, behavior, memory, and thoughts…and that can help us feel calm, encouraged, and so forth. Here, the scent triggers responses in the brain based on memories and experiences.

Notice that the limbic system, the part of the brain most closely connected with the olfactory system, is not connected with processing sight, sound, or touch…explaining why smell, more than any of the other five senses, is so successful at triggering emotions and memories.

And why essential oils have a particularly powerful effect when used aromatically.