Food on Fridays, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

33 Different Kinds of Coffee to Keep Even the Barista Confused

 

 

 

I am a simple person. I have dwindled my wardrobe into a 52-piece capsule wardrobe, organized my spice cabinet alphabetically, and cleaned/organized every single room in my house this year in my quest for minimalism and a better lifestyle in general for my family.

So it’s probably not a big shock that I “like my coffee like I do my men—strong, dark, and steamy”…or whatever that expression is.

 

But rumor tells me that there are so many perhaps better alternatives to this black coffee, options such as…

 

1. Affogato–a single or dual shot of espresso mixed with a scoop of vanilla ice cream

2. Americano—a single or double shot of espresso diluted with hot water

3. Bicerin Coffee—a shot of espresso, chocolate drink, and milk or cream all layered in a glass

4. Black Coffee—coffee with no dairy products such as milk or cream added

5. Bulletproof Coffee—a buttered coffee drink that supposedly helps you lose weight

6. Cappuccino—very similar to a café latte, but the foam and the chocolate sprinkles are more on the top than already mixed in

7. Cafe Latte—coffee with steamed milk froth and the micro-foam on top

8. Cold Brew—coffee beans steeped in water for twelve hours or more

9. Cortado—a Spanish beverage that contains coffee with a generous amount of warm milk

10. Cuban Espresso—a sweetened dark-roasted espresso shot with an addition of demerara sugar

11. Decaf Coffee—coffee that has some of the caffeine taken out

12. Double Espresso—two shots of espresso

13. Espresso—a single shot of espresso

14. Flat White— a single shot of espresso served with steamed milk

15. Galao Coffee—a Portuguese milky sweet coffee

16. Green Coffee—coffee that is made with coffee beans that haven’t been roasted to that familiar brown color that we all expect, supposedly great for those who are trying to lose weight

17. Iced Coffee—coffee with ice in it…(as if you couldn’t  figure that out already)

18. Instant Coffee—coffee powder that is prepared by making fine grains from already roasted coffee

19. Irish Coffee—black coffee with whiskey and sugar added and topped with cream

20. Kopi Luwak—a premium coffee type prepared in Asia that requires collecting coffee beans that have been crapped out by a Civet…(sorry, I think that I’ll pass on this one.)…

21. Kopi Tubruk—an Indonesian coffee drink that is made by dissolving coffee beans directly into the boiling water

22. Long Black Coffee—a single shot of espresso with 70% hot water added

23. Long Macchiato—a double shot of espresso with a layer of cream and foam added on the top

24. Mocha—a single shot of espresso with a spoonful of chocolate powder, steamed milk froth and microfoam, and them more chocolate powder on the very top.

25. Mushroom Coffee…regular coffee that has been infused with medicinal mushroom extracts…(see next post, you know, the one that I haven’t even written yet(?!)…

26. Piccolo Latte—a shot of espresso or Ristretto served in a demitasse cup with steamed milk and a little foam on top

27. Ristretto—a single shot of espresso with the same amount of coffee beans but the half amount of water

28. Short Macchiato-–a single shot of espresso with a layer of cream and foam added on the top

29. Sweet Coffee—coffee that contains some sort of sweetener

30. Turkish Coffee—a stronger and more aromatic Turkish beverage made by using coffee beans that have been ground so fine that it doesn’t even need filtering

31. Vienna Coffee—a type of black coffee served with a whopping amount of cream on the top

32. White Coffee—a mild version of traditional coffee with less brewing and less intense taste

33. Yuanyang Coffee—a popular beverage from Hong Kong that is prepared by combining both the coffee and tea

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Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

14 Reasons to Drink Another Cup of Coffee This Morning

For years it has been debated whether or not coffee is good for you or not…

Honestly, who cares?

Coffee has been given a bad rep in years past for causing various health risks…such as raising your blood pressure, making your heart race, impairing sleep, and even causing cancer.

But you are either a coffee drinker or you’re not a coffee drinker.

In fact, let’s first take a look at a few statistics as far as coffee consumption…

  • 2.25 billion cups of coffee are consumed around the globe each year.
  • 64% of Americans say they drink at least one cup of coffee daily.
  • 26% of adults say they drink only one cup daily.
  • 11% of adults say they drink at least four cups daily.
  • 102 billion cups of coffee are consumed by Americans each year.
  • 280.5 million cups of coffee are consumed by Amerian each day.
  • 2.7 cups of coffee are consumed by the average person every day of the week.
  • 26% of coffee drinkers say they’re addicted to coffee.
  • 46% of coffee drinkers who drink at least three cups each day say that they’re addicted to coffee..
  • 21,400 coffee shops exist throughout the country…one for every 14,000 Americans.
  • $36 billion in retail revenue happens per year.
  • 70 countries make and sell coffee.
  • 40% of the world’s coffee is produced in Brazil.

Having taken a look at these statistics, one thing is pretty obvious…

If you are a true coffee drinker, you are gonna drink coffee…and more coffee…and more coffee…regardless of what the so-called “experts” may or may not say, right?!

In fact, Americans drink 400 million cups of coffee per day, or 146 billion cups each year.

Actually there are health benefits to drinking coffee, so let’s ignore all the bad press…and make ourselves that we are doing ourselves a favor by drinking cup after cup after cup.

Just make sure that you don’t overload it with lots of cream and loads of sugar, and you can actually improve your health every single morning…(a Starbucks Venti White Chocolate Mocha, for instance, has 580 calories and 75 grams of sugar…while a plain cup of brewed coffee contains only two calories, no fat and zero carbs.

Coffee contains many nutrients—including riboflavin, pantothenic acid, manganese, potassium, magnesium and niacin.

Coffee can improve your health in such ways as reducing your risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke, type 2 diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, cancer, cirrhosis, gout, and liver disease.

 

Let’s explore these health benefits more…

 

1.Alzheimer’s …Although there is no known cure for Alzheimer’s, drinking coffee may lower your risk of ever getting Alzheimer’s in the first place, by up to 65%.

2.Brain Power…Studies have shown that coffee increases your brain power by improv various aspects of brain function—such as memory, mood, vigilance, energy levels, reaction times and general cognitive function—because the caffeine blocks an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, which leads to a stimulant effect.

3.Cancer…Cancer, uncontrolled growth of cells in the body, is one of the world’s leading causes of death…but coffee appears to reduce your risk of getting liver cancer, the third leading cause of cancer death in the world, by 40%…and colorectal cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the world by 15%.

4,Depression…Depression, a serious mental disorder that causes a significantly reduced quality of life, is incredibly common. In fact, about 4.1% of people in the U.S. currently meet the criteria for clinical depression. A Harvard study published in 2011 said that women who drank four  or more cups per day have a 20% lower risk of becoming depressed. People who drink four or more cups per day are  53% less likely to commit suicide.

5.Energy Levels…Coffee can help you people feel less tired and have more energy levels because of its caffeine content. As caffeine is absorbed into the bloodstream. and enters into the brain, the levels of neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine and dopamine, increases, leading to enhanced firing of neurons.

6.Heart…For years it was thought that coffee raised the risk of heart disease, but many recent studies have shown that this is not the effect. In fact, it is now believed that drinking three to five cups of coffee per day can lower your risk of heart failure by 11%…your risk of stroke by up to 30%….and your risk of cardiovascular disease by 19%.

7.Liver….Drinking coffee may be beneficial to your liver. Studies have shown that coffee can reduce your risk of getting liver cirrhosis, a condition where the liver has been largely replaced by scar tissue, by 66%…as well as lowering your risk of developing liver cancer by about 50%.

8.Longevity…Drinking around four cups of coffee a day can lower your risk of getting the serious life-threatening diseases—such as heart disease and cancer—also described in this list of health benefits. Over thirty-five studies have been conducted, covering more than 2 million people,  that agree with this belief.

9.Melanoma….According to the National Cancer Institute, drinking four or more cups of caffeinated coffee each day can lower your risk of developing melanoma by 20%.

10.Memory…Drinking two or three cups of coffee can improve your long- and short-term memory.

11.Metabolism…Several studies show that caffeine is one of the very few natural substances that can increase fat burning in the body and boost the metabolic rate. This is the reason that caffeine is found in almost every commercial fat burning supplement.

 

12.Parkinson’s Disease…Parkinson’s Disease is a common neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system caused by the death of dopamine-generating neurons in the brain and characterized by tremors,

There is no known cure for Parkinson’s, so it is definitely important that you do all that you can to keep from ever getting Parkinson’s in the first place.

Some studies have suggested that the caffeine in coffee may reduce your risk of ever developing Parkinson’s in the first place by up to 60%. Not only can coffee keep you from getting Parkinson’s, but two eight-ounce cups of black coffee can help to control the involuntary movements of people who already have the disease.

 

13.Physical Performance…Not only does the caffeine in coffee increase your metabolism, it also increases your adrenaline levels in the blood, your “fight or flight” hormone, which makes you ready for more intense physical exertion. In fact, drinking coffee about thirty minutes before going to the gym can improve physical performance by 11-12%, on average.

14.Type II Diabetes…Type 2 diabetes, elevated blood sugars in the context of insulin resistance or an inability to secrete insulin, currently afflicts about 300 million people worldwide.  According to the American Diabetes Association, about 1.5 million people are diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes each year.

Coffee contains chromium, a mineral that helps the body utilize insulin. For this reason, drinking coffee can reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 67%.

Increasing your coffee consumption by a couple of cups per day can decrease your risk of getting type 2 diabetes by at least 11%…up that number to at least six cups of coffee, and you can decrease your risk of getting type 2 diabetes by another 15%.

Heading Off to Work

Be Correct

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Okay by this point, you should have written something…anything…

You should also have resources at your disposal about the writing process from so-called “experts.”

Now comes what I actually find to be both the most rewarding and the most challenging part of the writing process—editing what you have written.

 

The amount of editing and revision that you will want to do on whatever you have written will obviously depend on what you have written and who will see what you have written.

But I have learned to look at the revision and editing process much like the zoom-in function on Mapquest…first look at the overall picture, and then zoom into different lenses as needed.

 

So let’s being with the 100% zoom-in lens…

Print out a hard copy of what you have written, and then approach the article as if you were either a reader reading this article for the very first time or a teacher grading a student’s work, not the person who has actually written it.

It is also a good idea to take the time to read the paper out loud, checking for run-on sentences, awkward pauses and transitions, unclear ideas, and other small grammatical and organization issues.

Another good idea would be to have someone else read what you have written and offer feedback. A new reader will be able to help you catch mistakes that you might have overlooked…

Examine the entire article that you have written, asking yourself “big questions” such as…

  • Am I writing this from the right point of view?
  • Am I writing this with the right tone of voice?
  • Do all of the ideas in the article make sense?
  • Do any sections or sentences need to be explained further?
  • Does the article have a specific purpose?
  • Does the article accomplish its intended purpose?
  • Have you made your best points obviously stand out?
  • Is any additional information needed?
  • Is it appropriate for my target audiences?
  • Is it clear?
  • Is it organized?
  • Is there any irrelevant information that should be deleted?
  • What is my “bottom line”?
  • What would you say is the most successful part of your article? Why?

The final step at this 100% level is to make sure that you are completely satisfied with your conclusion.

 

Now zoom down to the 75% Level and examine your paragraphs…

  • Are my paragraphs in the right order?
  • Does each paragraph have a clear topic sentence?
  • Does each paragraph have enough evidence to support this topic?
  • Should any of my paragraphs be eliminated completely?

 

Then zoom down to the 50% level and examine your sentences…

  • Do all of my sentences actually make sense?
  • Do all of my sentences move easily from one sentence to the next?
  • Do all of my sentences start with short, simple words and phrases?
  • Do any of my sentences have introductory clauses that are too long?
  • Do any of my sentences seem out of context?

 

…and the 25% Level to look at the specific words…

  • Are any of the words I have used simply “extra” words that I can delete?
  • Are any of the words I have used too vague?
  • Are any of the words I have used actually misused?

 

…and finally the 10% level to look at nitty-gritty details.

  • Commas—Make sure that any sentences with two main clauses are connected with a comma and a conjunction, separated with a semicolon, or rewritten as two sentences.
  • Omitted or repeated words—Read the paper aloud slowly to make sure you haven’t missed or repeated any words.
  • Parallelism-Look through your paper for series of items and make sure these items are in parallel form.
  • Pronouns—Stop at each pronoun. Look for the noun that the pronoun replaces. If you can’t find the noun, insert a noun earlier in the writing or change the pronoun to a noun. If you do find a noun, make sure the noun and pronoun agree in both number and person.
  • Sentence Fragments—Make sure each sentence has a subject and a complete verb. Use “helping verbs” if you need to. Make sure that dependent clauses are not written as complete sentences.
  • Spelling—Move a pencil under each line of text to help you to see each word individually. Do not simply assume that using spell-check will automatically fix every misspelled or misused word in the paper.There is no shame in actually checking with a dictionary.
  • Subject/Verb Agreement—Find the subject and verb that goes with the subject in each sentence. Make sure that if the subject is plural, the verb is also plural.

 

Obviously there’s no reason to edit every single thing that you write to this extreme, but being the obsessive-compulsive person that I am, I have found that having a series of questions like this helps my ADHD brain to stay focused as I read something that I have already written and read too many times to count already.