Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Book Review…Essential Glow

Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla

Essential Glow: Recipes & Tips for Using Essential Oils is an all-inclusive guide to natural beauty written for people who would like to learn how to use essential oils in their daily lives to boost their beauty, home, and general wellness.

This book sparked my interest because I am just now starting to use essential oils in my home now that I have started this journey to a happier and healthier lifestyle.

The title, Essential Glow, is appropriate for the book because the book was written by the same people who host the popular Hello Glow website—the ultimate source for daily inspiration, recipes, projects, and tips for living a healthy, mindful life and learning more about natural beauty and wellness.

The author of the book is Stephanie Gerber, a Nashville-based natural living blogger, who has also written…Stephanie Gerber says that she believes that “the journey to well-being can and should be, simple and beautiful, natural and stylish.”

The book is filled with over two hundred simple recipes and tutorials for making organic skincare and haircare-products, household cleaners, and even cosmetics at home…all using essential oils…including recipes for laundry softeners, all purpose cleaners, steam tablets, masks, bath oils, and invigorating scrubs.

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Getting Healthy

Book Review…Essential Oils: The Complete Guide: Essential Oils for Beginners, Aromatherapy and Essential Oil Recipes

 

 

Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla

Essential Oils: The Complete Guide: Essential Oils for Beginners, Aromatherapy and Essential Oil Recipes is a guide book about essential oils written to “introduce you to the world of essential oils and aromatherapy.”

The book was written primarily for beginners who have absolutely no prior knowledge about using essential oils and carrier oils.to show how to use them properly…

This book sparked my interest because so many of the natural body care and skincare products that I will be making and sharing in the near future contain them.

The title, Essential Oils: The Complete Guide: Essential Oils for Beginners, Aromatherapy and Essential Oil Recipes, is appropriate for the book because the book explains everything in simple, easy to understand steps..

The purpose of the book–showing how to use essential oils  properly-is carried out throughout the book as evident by the fact that the book tells the reader how to store your essential oils and carrier oils, and the fact that It is important to know what you are doing when you are using essential oils because some essential oils can do things such as increase UV light/sunlight sensitivity and affect your hormones.

According to the introduction, this book promises to teach you a natural treatment that takes care of both your mental and physical health at the same time…how to cure your common cold without the use of drugand how to start the day exploding with motivation and energy, whilst finishing the day calm, content and stress-free.all through the proper application of essential oils.

The author of the book is Amy Joyson.

The main idea of the book is that both your health and vitality can be improved through the use of essential oils.

My favorite part of the book was definitely the over 100 recipes for natural body and skincare products, as well as home cleaning products because this is something that I am focusing on right now in both my life and my blog…recipes to enhance your calm or self-esteem and confidence, to uplift your mood, to support your detox and many, many more.

Other topics discussed include what aromatherapy is and how you can use aromatherapy at home for stress relief and weight loss, what carrier oils are and how to use them, and what exactly essential oils are and how they work in the body.

I highly recommend this book, and feel that you will also be happy that you bought it.

Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

13 More Uses for Cedarwood Essential Oil

In addition to using cedarwood essential oil for your skin and hair, there are many other great uses for cedarwood essential oil. These include…

1. Aches and Pains…Cedarwood oil, especially Himalayan cedarwood, is a natural analgesic. This means that cedarwood essential oil can help get rid of any aches and pains. Many over-the-counter and prescription topically applied pain lotions and creams that are used to treat joint and muscle pain actually contain cedarwood essential oil.

To use cedarwood essential oil to help cure aches and pains, try one of the following…

  • Hot Bath…Take a hot bath with five drops of cedarwood essential oil
  • Massage Oil…Blend eight drops cedarwood oil with four teaspoons carrier oil

Blend for Aches and Pains…

  • 3 drops cedarwood essential oil
  • 3 drops helichrysum essential oil
  • 3 drops rosemary essential oil
  • 4 tsp carrier oil

2. ADHD…Cedarwood oil has been used to help children with ADHD. The oil is believed to be able to help these kids stay focused, and also to boost their learning capacity. In recent studies, children suffering from ADHD have been shown to have experienced improvements in brain activity and fewer ADHD symptoms after using cedarwood essential oil.

To use cedarwood essential oil to help you stay focused, try one of the following…

  • Inhalant…Inhale deeply while holding a bottle of cedarwood essential oil three times a day.

Blend for ADHD and Improving Focus/Learning Capacity

  • 3 drops cedarwood essential oil
  • 3 drops vetiver essential oil
  • 3 drops rosemary essential oil

3. Anxiety and Stress…Cedarwood essential oil has natural sedative properties.

The calming effect of cedarwood essential oil can be helpful for anyone having to  combat stress, anxiety, and depression…or looking for a decent, uninterrupted night’s sleep.

Cedarwood essential oil contains cedrol, a substance that promotes the release of serotonin in the brain. This serotonin is converted into melatonin and, as a result,  encourages restful sleep and helps you calm down and relax.

  • Diffusion…Diffuse cedarwood essential oil in a diffuser machine
  • Inhalant…To use cedarwood essential oil to combat stress, anxiety, and insomnia, try simply inhaling the oil straight from the bottle or from a handkerchief whenever you start feeling weird.

Blend for Anxiety, Stress, and Insomnia

  • 4 drops cedarwood essential oil
  • 4 drops lavender essential oil
  • 4 tsp carrier oil…
  • Massage into the body and heels of your feet before bedtime…

4. Arthritis and Rheumatism…Cedarwood oil, especially Himalayan cedarwood, acts as an anti-inflammatory properties.  This makes cedarwood essential oil great for people suffering from pains and stiffness of the joints—such as people with arthritis and rheumatism.

The best ways to use cedarwood essential oil to help treat arthritis and rheumatism both topical—as a massage oil, or added to a hot bath.

  • Bath Soak…Add five to ten drops to your hot bathwater.
  • Massage Oil…Dilute eight drops of cedarwood oil with a carrier oil. Rub into the affected joints and muscles.

Blend for Arthritis and Rheumatism

  • 3 drops cedarwood essential oil
  • 3 drops peppermint essential oil
  • 3 drops rosemary essential oil
  • 4 tsp carrier oil

5. Athlete’s Foot and Other Fungal Infections…Cedarwood essential oil is a antibacterial and antifungal agent that can be used effectively in treating a variety of fungal infections—such as athlete’s foot and toenail infections.

Blend for Athlete’s Foot and Toenail Infections

  • 3 drops cedarwood essential oil
  • 3 drops tea tree essential oil
  • 3 drops lavender essential oil
  • 4 tsp carrier oil

6. Bad Odors…Cedarwood essential oil is a natural deodorizer that can be used to freshen the air in your home. The oil can have long-lasting therapeutic effects for both you and your home.

The oil is used in many perfume and oil blends to add a warm, pleasant, wood-like scent that is both reassuring and comforting.

  • Diffuser…In order to not only deodorize your home…but also to create a calming, mood, try using the oil in your diffuser—either alone, or combine with two drops each of sandalwood and wild orange essential oils
  • Garbage Can Anti-Groucher…In order to keep your garbage cans from smelling like Oscar the Grouch just farted in there, combine several drops oto a spray bottle with water and spray it around garbage cans and anywhere where musty smells can erupt

Blend for Getting Rid of Bad Odors…Combine all ingredients in a glass spray bottle. Use to dust as you would regular furniture polish.

  • 1/3C water
  • 1/2Tbsp liquid castile soap
  • 8 drops wild orange essential oil
  • 4 drops cedarwood essential oil
  • 4 drops lemon essential oil

7. Coughs and Other Respiratory Problems…Cedarwood essential oil, especially Himalayan cedarwood, has antispasmodic ability. This simply means that cedarwood essential oil can be used to help with respiratory problems—such as colds, the flu, congestion, and asthma.

Cedarwood essential oil helps to clear phlegm and other breathing difficulties that come hand in hand with your flu or cold. Cedarwood essential oil also helps to relieve other symptoms of a cold such as a headache and watery eyes.

  • Chest Rub…Combine eight drop of cedarwood essential oil with 4tsp of a carrier oil.  Massage onto your chest and neck area before going to sleep at night.
  • Inhalant…Sniff the oil directly from the bottle when needed.
  • Steam Bath…Make a steam bath by adding a few drops to a sink full of hot water. Cover your head with a towel, Inhale the vapors for five minutes.

Blend for Coughs and Other Respiratory Problem

  • 3 drops cedarwood essential oil
  • 3 drops eucalyptus essential oil
  • 4 tsp carrier oil

8. Cuts, Scrapes, and Minor Wounds…Cedarwood essential oil is a natural antiseptic that can help cuts, scrapes, and minor wounds and skin damage by keeping the area from becoming infected.

To use cedarwood essential oil to treat minor wounds and skin damage, try…

  • Massage Oil…Add a few drops of cedarwood oil to coconut oil and massage gently onto any cuts, scrapes, or minor wounds.

Blend for Cuts, Scrapes, and Minor Wounds

  • 3 drops cedarwood essential oil
  • 3 drops lavender essential oil
  • 2 drops tea tree essential oil
  • 4 tsp carrier oil

9. Insects….Cedarwood essential oil is a natural insect repellant that is able to repel mosquitos, ants, ticks, fleas, and other bugs.

  • Bed Spray…Spray a diluted mixture of cedarwood essential oil on your bed sheets and pillows.
  • Bug Spray…Add five drops of cedarwood essential oil to an ounce of water. Add several drops of a carrier oil to the spray mixture to help absorb it into your skin easier. Spray on your skin.
  • Diffuser…Use cedarwood essential oil in your diffuser.
  • Dog Spray…Carefully spray your dog with a diluted cedarwood essential oil mixture of six drops of cedarwood essential oil and one ounce of water.
  • Entry Barrier…Spray cedarwood essential oil on screens and around doorways to keep fleas and other insects from entering the home in the first place.
  • Furniture Spray…Spray diluted cedarwood essential oil on your furniture to keep pests away.
  • Mosquito Repellant.. Add cedarwood essential oil to lemon eucalyptus essential oil  to make a powerful and natural mosquito blend.
  • Moth Deterrent…Dip cotton balls in cedarwood essential oil. Place them in your closet, on your hangers and inside of storage boxes.

10. Poor Muscle Tone…Cedarwood essential oil is a natural astringent that can tighten the skin, improve muscle tone, and leave you feeling rejuvenated.

  • Massage Oil…Dillute cedarwood essential oil with a suitable carrier oil—such as coconut, jojoba and almond oil.

11. Restless Leg Syndrome…Cedarwood essential oil can help relieve the symptoms of restless legs syndrome, the uncontrollable urge to move your legs constantly, because of its calming and soothing properties.

Blend for Restless Legs Syndrome

  • 3 drops cedarwood essential oil
  • 3 drops vetiver essential oil
  • 3 drops black pepper essential oil
  • 4 tsp carrier oil

12. Stress…Cedarwood essential oil is a natural sedative with the power to relieve tension and stress that can negatively affect your health. Its sedative properties and calming effects of cedarwood essential oil can help combat stress, depression, anxiety

The aroma of cedarwood essential oil promotes the release of serotonin in the brain which gets converted to melatonin which encourages restful sleep and a calm mind.

  • Diffuser…Diffuse cedarwood essential oil in a diffuser machine.
  • Inhalant…Simply inhale cedarwood essential oil from the bottle or put a few drops on a handkerchief and breathe it in whenever you feel the need.

Blend for Stress Relief…

  • 3 drops cedarwood essential oil
  • 3 drops rosemary essential oil
  • 3 drops lavender essential oil
  • 2 drops bergamot essential oil
  • 4 tsp carrier oil

13. Urinary Tract Infections, Kidney Trouble, Hypertension, and High Blood Pressure…Cedarwood is a natural diuretic that can increase the frequency of urination. This means that cedarwood essential oil can promote both the volume of urine produced and the frequency at which a person urinates. This is important is getting rid of any toxins, fats, and excess water.

  • Massage Oil…Try rubbing a few drops of cedarwood oil into your abdomen or bladder region.

Blend for Urinary Tract Infections, Kidney Trouble, Hypertension, and High Blood Pressure

  • 4 drops cedarwood essential oil
  • 4 drops lemon essential oil
  • 4 tsp carrier oil

Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Cedarwood Essential Oil—The What?!

Cedarwood essential oil is extracted from the wood pieces of a cedar tree, including any recycled and repurposed wood chips.

Cedarwood essential oils can be derived from several types of tree.

Typically, there are four major species of cedarwood used in the production of cedarwood essential oils. These evergreen conifers include…

    • Atlas
    • Himalayan
    • Texas
    • Virginia

The essential oil is created by the process of steam distillation.

As far as aroma, cedarwood has a warm, woodsy aroma that is comforting and reassuring. The oil is often used to add a warm tone to perfumes and oil mixtures.

As far as blending, cedarwood oil blends well with the following oils…

 

  • Benzoin
  • Bergamot
  • Cinnamon
  • Cypress
  • Frankincense
  • Jasmine
  • Juniper
  • Lavender
  • Lemon
  • Lime
  • Neroli
  • Patchouli
  • Peppermint
  • Pine
  • Ravensara
  • Rose
  • Rosemary
  • Sandalwood
  • Thyme
  • Vetiver

 

Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

April Essential Oil of the Month—Chamomile—The How?

 

Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla

We are all familiar with chamomile tea, having been read The Tale of Peter Rabbit,  written by Beatrix Potter in 1902, and hearing how chamomile tea was given to Peter after being chased by Mr McGregor.

But chamomile tea has been around since the Indian days, at least.

And it seemed like the Indians enjoyed their chamomile tea. The Tzeltal Mayan Indians in the highlands of southern Mexico brew chamomile tea with an orange and a lime leaf to “lift the mood.” Aleuts brewed chamomile tea to alleviate gas. Drinking the tea was a Cherokee trick for “regularity.”

 

Today chamomile tea remains one of the most popular varieties of tea in the market. In fact more than one million cups of chamomile tea are consumed per day.

But not only has chamomile used for nearly 5,000 years for chamomile tea. Throughout the centuries, there have been many other uses also, including…

 

Bath Soaks…Lavender Chamomile Bath Soak…Combine 1C Epsom Salt, the contents of 2 chamomile tea bags in a blender. Pulverize into a fine powder. Add 10 drops Lavender Essential Oil and 5 drops Roman Chamomile Essential Oil.

Candles

  • Place soy wax chips in a heatproof glass measuring cup. Heat in microwave for 30 seconds. Stir. Repeat until completely melted.
  • Attach a wooden candle wick to its metal tab. Dip the tab in melted wax. Center at bottom of a glass jar.
  • Heat 1Tbsp cooking oil on a stovetop. Steep two chamomile tea bags and 10 drops lavender essential oil until the oil is scented.
  • Remove the tea-infused oil from the heat.
  • Combine tea-infused and oil and the melted wax together.
  • Slowly pour the mixture into your glass jar. Let the wax  cool and solidify. Trim the wood wick.

 Compresses..Steep a chamomile tea bag in boiling water, as if you were going to drink it. Pour tea into a bowl. Let tea cool completely. Add a few ice cubes. Soak a muslin cloth in the cool tea and squeeze out. Place on eyes or sore area and leave for at least ten minutes.

Hand Rinse…Chamomile has been used as a hand rinse for gamblers needing good luck, because of its supposed magical ability to attract money…Steep a chamomile teabag as if you were making yourself a cup of tea. Set aside 1/4C of the tea to cool. Combine ¼C liquid castile soap, ¾tsp olive oil, 8 drops chamomile essential oil, and several drops of Vitamin E oil. Add tea when completely cooled. Mix ingredients well. Pour into a labeled pump bottle.

 

Liqueur...Chamomile has also been used as a flavoring agent for liqueurs such as Benedictine and vermouth…so why not tequila?!

  • Measure out 1C reposado tequila. Add two chamomile tea bags. Let steep thirty minutes. Place this mixture in the fridge for later.
  • Combine 1/2C honey, 2tsp dried lavender, and 1/2C water in a small saucepan over medium heat and warm, stirring once or twice, until the honey melts to make a simple syrup.
  • Fill a rocks glass with crushed ice.
  • Shake 2oz of the tequila mixture, 3/4oz of the simple syrup, 3/4oz freshly squeezed lime juice, and a dash of bitters in a cocktail shaker.

Mouthwash…

  • Combine 1/4C witch hazel, 1/4C aloe vera juice, 1/8C distilled water. Add two drops of chamomile essential oil and two drops of mint essential oil. Shake well. After thirty minutes, set the mixture in the fridge.
  • To use, combine 2Tbsp mixture with 1/4C warm water. 

Perfume…Perfume has been made from the pulverized dry flowers.

  • Combine 6 drops lavender essential oil, 10 drops chamomile essential oil, 1Tbsp carrier oil, and 3Tbsp vodka. Shake well. Place in a dark bottle. Let mixture remain undisturbed for two days.
  • After two days, add 2C distilled water. Let mixture stand for at least three weeks in a cool, dark place.
  • After this time, filter the mixture. Store it in a glass bottle that has a stopper.
  • To use, dab on pulse points.

 

 

 

Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Essential Oils to Keep…If You’d Like to Be Able to Sleep

Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla

When I first started using essential oils, I felt overwhelmed by the selections and how little I knew. Which one should I choose, and why? Almost like being a kid in a candy store.

But as I have started reading and studying more about living a healthier lifestyle and beginning new habits, I have also learned more about which essential oils work best for what the problem is.

For example, these are the best essential oils for helping to cure insomnia that are out there…but instead of going into depth about each one of these in this post, I have decided to choose one oil per month, and detail more and more reasons and ways to use that particular essential oil that particular month…

For example, the Essential Oil of the Month is bergamot (see next post…oh wait, you can’t…because at this point I haven’t finished writing it)…

Anyway, here are the best options as far as essential oils to help you sleep…

1.  BergamotBergamot essential oil is a cold-pressed essential oil that is produced by cells inside the rind and peel of a bergamot orange, a citrus fruit that has been used as a fragrance ingredient since around the year 1714. It takes about one hundred bergamot oranges to yield three ounces of bergamot oil.

Bergamot essential oil smells like a sweet light orange peel oil with a floral note and has a bright, yet calming and relaxing, effect. Bergamot essential oil is used to give Earl Grey tea its flavor, to calm anxious feelings, and to reduce both the heart rate and blood pressure.

2.  Cedarwood…Cedarwood essential oil is an essential oil that is produced from the foliage of various types of pine and cypress trees. The oil has an earthy, woodsy smell and supports healthy function of the pineal gland, which releases melatonin, the body’s natural sleepy hormone.

3.  Frankincense…Frankincense essential oil is a steam-distilled essential oil obtained from the tree resin of four main species of trees from the Boswellia genus. Frankincense essential oil has an earthy, balsamic fragrance and is perfect for balancing emotions, supporting healthy sleep, calming your mind and supporting your body’s natural response to healing.

4.  Juniper Berry…Juniper Berry essential oil is a steam-distilled essential oil that has a calming, grounding effect and an earthy, woodsy smell. The oil is extracted from the leaves and twigs of about fifty different species of junipers plant, a member of the cypress family that can grow anywhere within the Northern Hemisphere, all the way from the Arctic down towards tropical Africa, Pakistan, and the mountains of Central America. Most of the juniper berry essential oil that we use here in America has been harvested from juniper plants found in middle Tennessee, northern Alabama, and southern Kentucky.

5.  Lavender…Lavender essential oil is a steam-distilled essential oil that is obtained from the flower spikes of certain species of the lavender plant, a member of the mint family. Lavender essential oil has a relaxing and calming effect…and is used to reduce heart rate and blood pressure, help reduce feelings of tension, and calm emotions.

Most of us are already familiar with the lavender plant because the plant has been used as ornamental plants in garden and landscaping, as a culinary herb, and was one of the common colors in that magical 64-count box of Crayola crayons…the bo that had the sharpener on the back of the box…and that every kid in the classroom envied unless they had one themselves.

6.  Marjoram…Marjoram essential oil is steam-distilled from from the flowering leaves and tops of the marjoram plant, a somewhat cold-sensitive perennial herb or undershrub, that was referred to by the Romans as the “herb of happiness” and to the Greeks as the “joy of the mountains.”

The leaves have a unique mixture of sweet “pine” and citrus flavor. Most of us have had a marjoram spice container at least once in our spice cabinet of marjoram. If not an actual jar of marjoram by itself, perhaps a spice blend containing marjoram, such as herbes de Provence and za’atar…(I probably still have all three of these spices in the same container from back when I purchased thirty-one years ago when I first got married….let me go see)…

Anyway, marjoram essential oil is wonderful for muscles and joints, but it also excels in creating peaceful sleep and calming frazzled nerves.

7.  Roman Chamomile…Roman Chamomile essential oil has a calming, soothing, and relaxing effect and is perfect for helping to get rid of restlessness and anxious feelings.

The Roman chamomile plant is a low perennial plant found in dry fields, gardens, and cultivated grounds in Europe, North America, and in Argentina…and is used for making foods, herbal teas, perfumes, and cosmetics.

8.  Sandalwood...Sandalwood essential oil is a steam-distilled oil extracted from chips and billets cut from the heartwood of various species of sandalwood trees. Sandalwoods belong to the same botanical family as European mistletoe and can befound in India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Australia, Indonesia, Hawaii, and other Pacific Islands. Sandalwood is the second most expensive wood in the world, after African blackwood.

Sandalwood has a distinctive rich, woodsy smell that has been highly valued for centuries as an ingredient in perfumes, cosmetics.

9.  Vetiver…Vetiver essential oil is distilled from the roots of a type of grass that is widely cultivated in tropical regions such as Haiti, India, and Indonesia. Vetiver has a psychologically grounding, calming and stabilizing effect and a rich and earthy smell.

10.  Ylang Ylang…Ylang ylang essential oil is extracted from the flowers of a ylang-ylang tree that is native in the rainforest habitats of the Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia. Ylang-ylang is also widely used in oriental- or floral-themed perfumes such as Chanel No. 5…and is also believed to relieve high blood pressure, to help with skin problems, and to be an aphrodisiac. In fact, in Indonesia, ylang-ylang flowers are spread on the bed of newlywed couples.

Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

While We’re Still on the Topic

Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla
Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla is a member of the Aster Family, Asteraceae or Compositae, the dried flowewrs of which are one of the most well-known herbal teas of commerece, valued for flavor, mild anti-inflammatory activity, and a calming effect.

Another option for using your essential oils is topically.

 

There are times when deciding whether to use your oils aromatically or topically seems like perfectly good common sense.Applying oils topically simply works better for certain circumstances, such as when using them for aches, pain, sore muscles, and injuries. 

 

Then there are other times when how to best use your oils isn’t so obvious…such as when using essential oils for such issues as sleep, anxiety and lack of energy.

 

But how can I be sure that I am using my essential oils the “best” way possible?

The decision between using the diffuser to use the oils aromatically or applying the oil topically basically depends on whether or not you need the effects to benefit your entire body, or just one centralized area.

If you need the benefits throughout, it is best to use the diffuser because this delivers a quick dose of “good stuff” into the bloodstream.  This usually works best when dealing with emotional, neurological, and respiratory issues.

If you need the benefits to focus on one particular area, it is best to apply topically. Substances that are applied topically to the skin slowly permeate and are absorbed through the skin, eventually entering into the bloodstream.

For example, people suffering from problems sleeping benefit from using oils topically because studies have shown that the chemical components of lavender essential oil enter the bloodstream within five minutes of massaging the lavender essential oil onto the skin.

 

How do I use essential oils topically?

To use essential oils topically, start with only one or two drops of the essential oil. This should be all that you usually need because only a little bit of essential oil can go a very, very long way.

Sounds way too simple, right?!

 

Well, actually it is…and here’s why…

Before applying the essential oil to your skin, you will most likely need to dilute the essential oil with a “carrier oil.” (Examples of carrier oils that can be used to dilute essential oils include olive oil, coconut oil, almond oil, and avocado oil.)

 

“Most likely”…gee, that tells me a whole lot, right?

There are several types of essential oils on the market today that may or may not require diluting the oil with a carrier oil first. But the instructions on the essential oil itself will be the best place to figure out if and how the oil needs to be diluted.

But a few classifications of essential oils that you might want to keep in mind are…

 

Neat Oils…This may depend on the essential oil itself as to whether or not you need to dilute the essential oil with a carrier oil first. There is a category of oils classified as “neat” oils that do not require diluting with a carrier oil before each use.  These include…

Hot Oils…Then there are other essential oils that are high in phenols and must ALWAYS be diluted with a carrier oil before being used topically. These include cassia, cinnamon, clove, oregano, lemongrass, bergamot, and thyme.

Sensitive Oils…“Sensitive” oils are those that do not require dilution before use topically, but should be diluted before use on young or sensitive skin. These include black pepper, eucalyptus, ginger, and peppermint.

Photosensitive Oils“Photosensitive” oils contain furocoumarins, a type of extremely photosensitive compounds that may cause a rash or darkened skin if used before exposure to sunlight, sunlamps, or other sources of UV light. Such types of light should be avoided for up to twelve hours after using these oils topically. These “photosensitive” oils are typically citrus oils such as angelica, bergamot, grapefruit, lemon, orange, and tangerine.

 

Diluting your essential oils does not make the essential oil less effective, but actually offers many benefits that can make the essential oil work even better. These benefits include helping to “carry” the essential oil onto the skin, preventing particular oils from feeling too warm on the skin, keeping the essential oil from evaporating too quickly, increasing the surface area that your essential oil can cover at one time, enhancing absorption through dry skin, and preventing “sensitivity responses.”

 

Sensitivity Responses? Gee, made the skeptic in me wonder if essential oils are even worth the effort when I first read about “sensitivity responses”…

The truth is that just like almost anything else that you could possibly use on your skin, there is a chance—ever so slight—that a given essential oil could cause a reaction or “sensitivity response” for some individuals.

You can avoid such reactions by applying a small amount of essential oil to an ” inconspicuous” area and checking regularly to make sure that no reaction takes place before using it many more places also.

It is also a good idea to keep track of what oils you use, amounts used, where you apply, your thoughts and impressions on that particular oil, and any reactions that you do experience. Also try only one new essential oil at a time.

 

 

Another good idea would be to go ahead and mix your essential oil and your carrier oil together, and then store in a used or empty essential oil bottle or roller bottle so that you won’t have to dilute the oil every single time that you want to use it.

Finally, be aware of the importance of purchasing and using only quality essential oils from reputable sources. Do not assume anything about the purity, the efficacy, or the reliability of the essential oil.

Because many manufacturers have been reported as actually mixing essential oils with synthetic materials or other unknown ingredients to help stretch the oils and reduce costs, you need to be confident that you are actually getting the product that you are paying for. (no, this is not a plug for a future offer…just a fact…don’t worry)…

Essential oils should not have an expiration date. If there actually is a date on the bottle, this probably means that the oil contains additives and might not be from a good source.

 

Where do I apply the oil?

The soles of your feet have large pores that rapidly absorb essential oils and are not very sensitive, so this is a very good, safe place to start using essential oils topically. Simply and massage in two to four drops of your essential oil.

Other places where insomniacs and people who can’t sleep and people who are stressed out and so forth might want to try applying oils for help in dealing with stress and anxiety include across the forehead, behind the ears, the temples, the tops of your shoulders, and your wrists.

Good options of essential oils for this would be frankincense, lavender, peppermint, and cedarwood. (Just wait, my next post is about which essential oils are best for sleeplessness.)…

 

 

Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

The Essentials about Essential Oils

Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla
Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla is a member of the Aster Family, Asteraceae or Compositae, the dried flowewrs of which are one of the most well-known herbal teas of commerece, valued for flavor, mild anti-inflammatory activity, and a calming effect.

Essential oils are perhaps the oldest known element in following a “natural health” regimen…dating back to the ancient Egyptians, who seem to have used them as far back as 3500BC for religious, cosmetic, and health purposes.

Essential oils have been called the “life blood” of the plant and are typically extracted from within the many shrubs, flowers, trees, roots, bushes and seeds in which they are found through the process of steam distillation. These essential oils have been used for both physical and emotional benefits for thousands of years.

Each person will respond to the aroma, or these specific chemical elements, when breathing in the scent of an essential oil, in his or her own unique way…based on individual emotions, behaviors, memories, and experiences.

That being said, certain essential oils are always considered to have a certain effect regardless of these factors. Certain oils simply almost always seem more uplifting, more invigorating, more calming, more soothing….

In a future post, I will be sharing a list of the best essential oils to use when fighting insomnia.

 

But what good is that list of essential oils and a brand new vial of essential oil…if you’re like I was the first time that I purchased essential oil. It sat in my bathroom for years before I finally gave it away to my daughter because I had no clue what to do with it…(okay, did I just admit that?!)

Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla
Chamomile; German Chamomile; Hungarian Chamomile; Camomile; Matricaria recutita; Chamomilla recutita; Matricaria chamomilla is a member of the Aster Family, Asteraceae or Compositae, the dried flowewrs of which are one of the most well-known herbal teas of commerece, valued for flavor, mild anti-inflammatory activity, and a calming effect.

Essential oils can have a huge positive influence on us both physically and psychologically.

Physically, using essential oils aromatically can help heal and maintain the respiratory system by improving the quality of the air we are breathing and protecting us from environmental threats…

Psychologically, using essential oils aromatically can help control moods, tension, and stress.

But first, how and why do essential oils work aromatically?

When you inhale essential oils, you are actually breathing in a fine mist or vapor of the actual oil. This vapor contains all the same properties of the actual liquid oil itself, just in a different format.

Once you have inhaled the vapor, the scent of the essential oil interacts with smell receptors located in the brain, known as “olfactory sensors.”

These “olfactory sensors” are part of the “olfactory system,” the part of the brain that regulates our sense of smell. The “olfactory system” part of the brain is located near and closely connected to the limbic system.

Once the scent is processed by the olfactory system, it travels through the olfactory nerve to the limbic system.

The “limbic system” is the part of the brain responsible for processing smell, emotions, behavior, memory, and thoughts…and that can help us feel calm, encouraged, and so forth. Here, the scent triggers responses in the brain based on memories and experiences.

Notice that the limbic system, the part of the brain most closely connected with the olfactory system, is not connected with processing sight, sound, or touch…explaining why smell, more than any of the other five senses, is so successful at triggering emotions and memories.

And why essential oils have a particularly powerful effect when used aromatically.