Home Mile High Vegan Eats About Me Online Buzz Recipes Blogroll That Was Vegan? Recipes so delicious you’ll never think twice! My Favorite (“Chicken-style”) Seitan Recipe by Barb on January 30, 2012 Updated: Hello seitan lovers! I’ve updated the pictures and added a nice printable recipe. If you’re looking for the old “step-by-step” pictures, they’re waaaay at the bottom. Enjoy! Seitan is probably my favorite meat-substitute, not onlSkip to main content Follow us on: Get the Allrecipes magazine BROWSE Ingredient Search 1 Create a profile Home Recipes Everyday Cooking Vegan Chicken Seitan 12 made it | 9 reviews | 2 photos 1 Recipe by: ShrimpGhost “The easiest and best seitan recipe I’ve ever used. You can use this recipe wherever meat is called for, shape it before cooking to make nuggets or patties, and after cooking you can grind or shred the ‘meat’ to fit whatever the recipe calls for. This recipe has a slight chicken flavor, but if you want it to have more of a beef flavor, just add beef bouillon or soup-mix to the liquids in your broth. Seitan soaks up so much flavor, the possibilities are endless so go ahead and experiment with your favorite seasonings.” Save I Made It Rate it Print Pin Share Ingredients 1 h 20 m 12 servings 103 cals On Sale What’s on sale near you. On We’re showing stores near Fort Worth Update Location Kroger 301 S Bowen Rd ARLINGTON, TX 76013 2 cups vital wheat gluten 1 teaspoon dried rosemary 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried sage 1/4 teaspoon cumin seed 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder Bolner’s Fiesta Extra Fancy Garlic Powder 5.5 Oz $4.39 for 1 item – expires in 3 weeks 2 cups water 1/3 cup tamari or soy sauce 8 cups water 1/2 cup tamari or soy sauce 1/2 teaspoon onion powder Kroger Onion Powder 2.12 Oz $1.99 for 1 item – expires in 2 weeks Bolner’s Fiesta Onion Powder 4.5 Oz $4.79 for 1 item – expires in 3 weeks 2 (4 inch) pieces dashi kombu (dried kelp) Add all ingredients to list Directions Add a note Print Prep 20 m Cook 45 m Ready In 1 h 20 m In a large glass bowl, mix together the vital wheat gluten, rosemary, thyme, sage, cumin seed, and garlic powder. In a separate bowl, combine the water and tamari or soy sauce. Using a sturdy spoon and working very quickly, gradually pour liquid into gluten mixture. The gluten will develop very fast and become very rubbery and elastic. If there is any remaining dry mix, quickly add a small amount of water to soak it up. Working on a flat, clean countertop, knead the dough a few times then shape into a log about the diameter of your fist. Shaping the dough can be a little tricky as it is rubbery and resistant, but just be patient. Set aside to rest for 15 minutes while making stock. In a large stock pot, boil 8 cups water with 1/2 cup tamari or soy sauce, onion powder, and dashi kombu. Cut gluten log into desired shapes, maximum 1/2 inch thick. Individually drop the gluten pieces into boiling stock. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 45 minutes. Seitan may now be breaded and fried, chopped up and used in salads, or seasoned in any way you like. You might also like Shoyu Chicken Similar to teriyaki chicken, this is a tasty grilled meal with rich flavors! Shoyu Chicken Similar to teriyaki chicken, this is a tasty grilled meal with rich flavors! Chicken Breasts Pierre Make any night gourmet with this simple chicken dish! Get the magazine Get a full year for $10! Cook 5-star weekday dinners every time. Nutrition Facts Per Serving: 103 calories; 0.1 g fat; 9.1 g carbohydrates; 14.8 g protein; 0 mg cholesterol; 1119 mg sodium. Full nutrition I made it! Share Similar recipes Chicken and Dumplings IV 207 Slow Cooker Chicken and Noodles 160 My Chicken Parmesan 26 Seitan Makhani (Vegan-Style Indian Bu… 9 Vegan Recipes 2396 recipes Cutting Up a Whole Chicken By: Allrecipes Staff Reviews Read all reviews 9 Rate and review 11 Ratings Most helpful positive review MT Girl 69 40 11/4/2004 As far as seitan goes this is pretty good. I have tried to make seitan a few times and this was definitely the best one I’ve tried (easy and similar in taste to the store-bought kind. I didn’t… Read more Most helpful critical review frito19 0 1 5/20/2007 The seitan is much less ‘spongey’ if you put the seitan in cold broth and then bring it up to a simmer instead of dropping it in boiling broth. Read more ADVERTISEMENT Most helpful Most positive Least positive Newest frito19 0 1 5/20/2007 The seitan is much less ‘spongey’ if you put the seitan in cold broth and then bring it up to a simmer instead of dropping it in boiling broth. Read more MT Girl 69 40 11/4/2004 As far as seitan goes this is pretty good. I have tried to make seitan a few times and this was definitely the best one I’ve tried (easy and similar in taste to the store-bought kind. I didn’t… Read more FRAMBUESA 28 475 4/4/2007 I’ve always baked my seitan in the oven because boiling it always seemed wrong to me, but I thought I’d give this a try since everyone seemed to like it… Suffice it to say I’m glad I halved th… Read more peebsy weebsy 0 91 10/15/2011 I’ve made seitan a few different ways (baked, steamed and wrapped in cheesecloth then simmered) but I’ve never made it by dropping it directly in simmering broth as in this recipe and I don’t th… Read more Mary M. 262 157 2/20/2007 As one reviewer mentioned already, this does have a much spongier texture than the seitan recipe I was used to working with, but I rather like that, especially for vegetarian chicken salad recip… Read more Caseyspunk 39 26 4/1/2006 I will say that it had excellent flavor, it soaked up so much into it. However, it came out very spongey, not quite seitan. I will try a second batch another time and see how that on fairs. Read more Corbet 8 3 6/19/2006 This turned out very tasty — I was quite pleased by the flavour. I look forward to making this again. Read more krissy 34 2 2/10/2005 this was wonderful! my partner absolutely loved it! Read more Strwbrrykizzes 65 19 1/4/2007 Very good! Read more Light Malt Loaf 1 By Kenneth Meat Gravy 10 By Buon Appetito ADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENT About Us Newsroom Jobs at Allrecipes Advertising Advertise with Us Meredith Women’s Network Support Site Map Contact Us Customer Support Global Community © 2018 Allrecipes.com All Rights Reserved Privacy Policy Your California Rights EU Privacy Policy Terms of Service Data Policy EU Data Subject Requests AdChoices More Allrecipes Allrecipes Magazine – Subscribe Allrecipes Apps Food Wishes Videos The Allrecipes Blog y because its texture is almost exactly how I remember meat to be, but because it’s delicious and so versatile. I make a batch about once a month and use it on pizza, sandwiches and sometimes in my tofu scrambles. It’s excellent for veganizing recipes left over from my “pregan” days as you can sub it in for any meat. This recipe was adapted from Terry Hope Romero’s Steamed White Seitan recipe in Viva Vegan!, which was my first all-vegan cookbook. Her recipe was meant to simulate chicken or pork, but I think you can use it for pretty much anything. I know you can buy more and more seitan products at the store, but I really believe that home made is best. Not quickest, certainly… and yes, making your own does mean you have to clean your kitchen afterward, BUT I find the texture and the flavor to be far superior. Seriously you guys, I snack on this stuff straight up- no sauces, no additional seasonings, nothing. Deelish! I also made a few small adjustments to the recipe… You know, now that I’ve been making it once a month for like 3 years… My Favorite (“Chicken-style”) Seitan Recipe Serves 8 Write a review Save Recipe Print Prep Time 15 min Cook Time 30 min Total Time 45 min Ingredients 1.5 cups cold chick’n or vegetable broth (or water and bouillon cube) 2 tablespoons olive oil 1.5 cups vital wheat gluten flour 1/4 cup chickpea flour 1/3 cup nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1.5 teaspoons poultry or chicken seasoning 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/2 teaspoon cumin 1/2 teaspoon onion powder 1/2 to 1 tablespoon sea salt (I used a full tablespoon, but I love salt. Some people have found it to be a bit much) Aluminum foil Instructions Wisk together broth and olive oil, and set aside. In a large bowl stir together all the remaining ingredients. Once they’re completely combined, create a well in the center, then pour in the broth mix Stir with a rubber spatula until the entire mixture pulls away from the sides of the bowl. Now it’s time to knead! Knead the dough for 2-3 minutes. Your hands may get tired but this step is crucial to develop the gluten. You’ll actually be able to see the dough’s consistency change, it’s pretty cool! You can knead in the same bowl, or you can move it to a cutting board (you’ll have to do that later anyway). Keep in mind as you’re kneading that you’re going to be cutting it into 4 loaves, so working it into a square/rectangle is better than a roundish lump. Let it rest for about 10 minutes, then knead for another 30 seconds. This is your last chance to get it into a workable shape for cutting. Move to the cutting board if you haven’t already, and slice into 4 equal sized loaves. From your box of aluminum foil, tear off 4 pieces, each about 6 inches wide. Wrap each piece of seitan by folding the long edges, and then the short edges. You want the loaf to be completely covered, but with room to expand, so don’t make it too tight. Steam for 30 minutes. If you don’t have a steamer, you can use my ghetto-fabulous method. I fill a pot with about an inch of water, and heat it to boiling. I put the foil-wrapped loaves into a metal colander, which I place into the pan (make sure the water level is lower than the loaves themselves, you don’t want them to get wet) and cover. If you’re using my method, and the loaves are at all stacked, you should switch them around about halfway through. Remove from the steamer and let cool for 30 minutes or so before putting it in the fridge for at least an hour. Then you can wrap in plastic wrap or zippie bags. Notes Makes 4 loaves, each of which makes about 2 servings. Wrapped tightly, it’ll last in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Freeze it, and it’ll last for months. Please don’t try my steaming-in-the-colander method unless your colander is metal! By Barb@ThatWasVegan Adapted from Viva Vegan! Here’s the old version of the recipe, with photos! “Chicken-Style” Seitan (4 loaves, each makes about 2 servings) Recipe adapted from Viva Vegan! Wrapped tightly, it’ll last in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Freeze it, and it’ll last for months. Ingredients: 1.5 cups cold chick’n or vegetable broth (or water and bouillon cube) 2 T olive oil 1.5 cups vital wheat gluten flour 1/4 cup chickpea flour 1/3 cup nutritional yeast 1 t garlic powder 1.5 t poultry or chicken seasoning 1/2 t paprika 1/2 t cumin 1/2 t onion powder 1/2 to 1 T Herbamere or sea salt (I used a full tablespoon, but I love salt. Some people have found it to be a bit much) Aluminum foil Directions: 1. Wisk together broth and olive oil, and set aside. 2. In a large bowl stir together all the remaining ingredients. Once they’re completely combined, create a well in the center, then pour in the broth mix. 3. Stir with a rubber spatula until the entire mixture pulls away from the sides of the bowl. Now it’s time to knead! 4. Knead the dough for 2-3 minutes. Your hands may get tired but this step is crucial to develop the gluten. You’ll actually be able to see the dough’s consistency change, it’s pretty cool! You can knead in the same bowl, or you can move it to a cutting board (you’ll have to do that later anyway). Keep in mind as you’re kneading that you’re going to be cutting it into 4 loaves, so working it into a square/rectangle is better than a roundish lump. This was mine, about halfway through and before I transferred it to a cutting board… 5. Let it rest for about 10 minutes, then knead for another 30 seconds. This is your last chance to get it into a workable shape for cutting. Move to the cutting board if you haven’t already, and slice into 4 equal sized loaves. 6. From your box of aluminum foil, tear off 4 pieces, each about 6 inches wide. Wrap each piece of seitan by folding the long edges, and then the short edges. You want the loaf to be completely covered, but with room to expand. 7. Steam for 30 minutes. If you don’t have a steamer, you can use my ghetto-fabulous method. I fill a pot with about an inch of water, and heat it to boiling. I put the foil-wrapped loaves into a metal colander, which I place into the pan (make sure the water level is lower than the loaves themselves, you don’t want them to get wet) and cover. If you’re using my method, and the loaves are at all stacked, you should switch them around about halfway through. 8. Remove from the steamer and let cool for 30 minutes or so before putting it in the fridge for at least an hour. Then you can wrap in plastic wrap or zippie bags. Enjoy! Follow Share on Tumblr Comments on this entry are closed. Bianca- Vegan Crunk January 30, 2012, 11:03 am I love steamed seitan! It’s so delicious! Link Barb January 30, 2012, 1:32 pm Me too! Since I made this last batch I’ve had it on pizza, and chopped up and mixed with taco seasoning, sprinkled on my salad! Link gail January 30, 2012, 12:13 pm i’ve always thought about trying to make seitan – you make it look easy 🙂 can’t wait for your cake recipe too! Link Barb January 30, 2012, 1:33 pm Thanks!! I can’t wait to share it! I also can’t wait to get home from work and have another piece 🙂 Link Reia January 30, 2012, 10:50 pm I love how you incorporated the step by step pics this time. It’s a huge help for people like me who aren’t as comfortable in the kitchen as others, and like to have visual confirmation that things are going as they should! I’ve only tried making my own seitan once, but the recipe was very different, so I will have to give this one a shot. Link Barb January 31, 2012, 1:33 pm I like having visual confirmation too! Unfortunately, now that I’m on this end, it’s not always the most convenient process… Link Vegan Thyme (Kelly) January 31, 2012, 8:16 pm Excellent! What a great play-by-play photo job! I love this post as it reminds me why it is way too easy for me to linger in Whole Foods over all the “seitan” pre-packaged options and end up with them in my cart vs. making my own! I have that cookbook and love it! I need to get “satan” making! Link Barb February 4, 2012, 6:33 pm It’s amazing how easy it actually is. I still sometimes buy the pre-made, but then always regret it… Link Heather February 1, 2012, 8:31 am Your ghetto fabulous method is perfect for steaming! You make, making seitan look so easy, I have to try this method! Link Barb February 4, 2012, 6:34 pm If you do, let me know how it turns out! Link Natalie March 11, 2012, 10:59 am What if I want to eat right away? Do I have to put it in the fridge? Can’t this be eaten warm? Link Barb March 11, 2012, 12:08 pm The time in the fridge helps it to firm up, so if you ate it right away it would probably have a different consistency. Link Connie Fletcher May 5, 2012, 12:26 pm Barb, go to Planeat.com it’s a video and has recipes from some folks, one s for Seitan Brisket by Chad Sarno….it’s driving me nutz, cuz I made it and it didn’t work out. See what you think, cuz the flavor is out of this world…..really delish, but (and it’s a BIG but…no, not that kind…) it didn’t hold together and it’s soo smooshy….yuck…but the flavor is stunning….Help??!!?? Link Connie Fletcher May 7, 2012, 6:43 am Actually, I tried to go to Planeat. om ad it didn’t work, so I googled Planeatmovie and it took me to the right site. Please help me…someone..this is really worth trying……… Link Barb May 11, 2012, 4:45 pm I’ll add it to my “to make” list, it does sound good! I have to warn you though, it’s a pretty long list 🙂 Seriously… I spend way too much time dreaming up new recipes to work on, not to mention pinning and bookmarking other people’s recipes I want to try! But I promise to get back to you when I do! Link Connie Fletcher May 11, 2012, 4:57 pm Thank you….I think it will be worth your while. The flavor is really great, but the texture……..not so much. Again, thank you! Link Moonrivers June 15, 2012, 7:38 pm Any reason in particular to using chickpea flour as opposed to something like teff or soy or some other kinds of flour? I always buy different flours for different recipes and sometimes forget what flour is for what recipe so I’ve got too many kinds of flour. I’ve always got to question things, I know. Have you ever tried teff flour? Link Barb June 18, 2012, 10:49 am The reason is simply that it’s my flour of choice. I’ve never tried it with other types, if I were you I’d google recipes that call for a flour you’d rather use. Link Claire September 12, 2015, 2:44 am I made it tonight and I had to substitute a few things for what I had because I didn’t want to go to the store. Used seasoning that goes on poultry instead of poultry seasoning. Used white flour instead of chickpea. It turned out great. Link Barb September 16, 2015, 7:50 am Great! I’m glad to hear it worked with regular flour, I’ve never tried that! Link Claire September 12, 2015, 2:46 am I also battered it with egg and flour and pan fried it and damn. I grew up eating chicken breaded that way and I really .missed it Link Sarah July 16, 2012, 3:15 pm I made this seitan yesterday and used it in a recipe today. It was the BEST I have ever made and I’m pretty sure I can use it in place of the crazy pricey tofurky deli slices my kid has been eating. And a helluva lot healthier. THANK YOU!!! Link Barb July 17, 2012, 5:24 am You’re so welcome, and I’m super happy to hear that it works for you! Link johnrpotter August 16, 2012, 4:05 pm This is the best seitan recipe thus far!!!! I have to say I try to avoid the whole mock meat issue, however my kids enjoyed the chicken nuggets I made with this and I am currently cooking a second batch to try my hand at a mock chicken salad. Link Barb August 16, 2012, 5:11 pm I’m so happy to hear that!! I don’t buy a lot of the mock meats either, I mostly stick with tofu (or just veggies), but I really enjoy home made seitan. Link Taylor September 13, 2012, 10:32 am Amazing recipe! Do you know the nutrition facts? Link Barb September 13, 2012, 11:49 am I’m sorry, I never tabulated them. It’s on my “list” to start doing that for recipes, though. Sorry! Link Jane September 20, 2012, 6:50 am Hi Barb, This look delish. Can you tell me, what brand of chicken seasoning did you use? I am thinking that depending on the brand, there could be a lot of variation in sodium content and if my seasoning has more salt, I might want to cut down on the amount of salt I add to the recipe. Thanks! Link Barb September 20, 2012, 6:54 am It was the Sunflower Farmer’s Market brand, About MVC Contact MVC Recipes Plant-based & Healthy Blog Articles & Discussion Ebooks & Apps Free & Web Accessible Gardening The Veganic Way Recipe Categories Snacks & Appetizers Salads Soups, Stews & Chowders Sandwiches Side Dishes Main Dishes Breads Sauces, Dressings & Dips Desserts Beverages Meat Alternatives Dairy Alternatives “Chicken” Seitan Posted on February 10, 2012March 14, 2014 by My Vegan Cookbook A lot of seitan recipes tend to be either too soft or too tough. When I started working on this recipe my mission was clear, to make the ultimate seitan “chicken”. The texture is perfection. It’s just the right amount of chewy without being tough. It’s tender without being too soft and so moist. And most importantly it’s bursting with chicken-like flavor. I have a “chicken” salad recipe coming up using this recipe so stay tuned. GO TO “CHICKEN” SEITAN RECIPE> This entry was posted in Recipes. Bookmark the permalink. 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All Rights Reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for personal and educational use only. Commercial copying, hiring, lending is prohibited. which probably doesn’t help you much. Sorry! Link Timi Caswell February 23, 2013, 2:57 pm Hands down, the BEST seitan recipe I’ve tried! I almost gave up on making it from scratch but you renewed my faith. Thank you, thank you!!!! Link Barb February 25, 2013, 11:43 am You’re welcome, and I’m so glad it worked out for you! 🙂 Link malbertini February 24, 2013, 6:40 pm This recipe is fantastic! Thank you for giving me a new staple to work with. (I’ll never go back to store-bought!) Link Barb February 25, 2013, 11:42 am You’re welcome, and THANK YOU! Link Joshua March 3, 2013, 2:59 pm Wow! I’m really impressed by this recipe – I had it on my list of things to make for a while now, but overestimated the difficulty and underestimated the deliciousness. Last time I tried making homemade seitan, I boiled it in broth and the flavor didn’t really come out that well, and this is an amazingly different thing! Thank you so much for posting this! Link Barb March 4, 2013, 9:16 am Thanks for the great feedback! I made some myself yesterday, and it truly is my FAVORITE! Link Choy soo Ying March 28, 2013, 1:33 am I cannot find vital wheat gluten where I live in Malaysia. Is there a way to make ones own? I really would like to make my own seitan as I also cannot find this . Thank you for whatever suggestions. Link Barb March 28, 2013, 10:17 am I would recommend buying it online, perhaps through Amazon? I’m not aware of any ways to make your own, sorry. Good luck! Link Ashley April 2, 2013, 12:00 pm I made this before and had a question on the recipe. I used one tablespoon of sea salt as the recipe suggested. It turned out way too salty, was that a typo? I’m thinking one teaspoon may be more appropriate. Link Barb April 4, 2013, 7:08 am No, I meant a Tablespoon, but I tend to love salt more than other people 😉 I just edited it to add that some people might prefer less, thanks for the feedback! Link April April 8, 2013, 9:35 pm Would it work if I use parchment paper instead of aluminum foil and just fold it well?? Has anyone tried it? I try to avoid aluminum touching my food, and I like the safer non-stick properties of the parchment paper. Thank you so much for this recipe! I tried making seitan with another recipe once and it wasn’t even edible, and was a TON of work and mess to clean up. This looks easy and like it would be more flavorful too! Can’t wait to try it! Link Barb April 9, 2013, 2:23 pm I’m really not sure… you’d have to do something to make sure the paper doesn’t come unwrapped… Link April April 9, 2013, 3:09 pm Tell me if you think this would work…..wrapping the seitan loafs in parchment paper using a burrito type fold and having the loose edge sitting on the bottom so it doesn’t open….?? Link Barb April 10, 2013, 1:40 pm I think that would work, but you do need to flip them halfway through. Perhaps by then the steam will be holding the parchment paper together better? Let me know how it turns out! Link April April 10, 2013, 4:05 pm Ahhh yes. I forgot about that part. Maybe I could use something like a small plate to weight them down if needed to keep them closed at that point? Or would that make for extra ugly seitan? LOL I will let you know how it goes for sure. Thanks for all your help! Link April May 20, 2013, 9:32 am Update- What turned out to be easiest for me was to wrap in About MVC Contact MVC Recipes Plant-based & Healthy Blog Articles & Discussion Ebooks & Apps Free & Web Accessible Gardening The Veganic Way Recipe Categories Snacks & Appetizers Salads Soups, Stews & Chowders Sandwiches Side Dishes Main Dishes Breads Sauces, Dressings & Dips Desserts Beverages Meat Alternatives Dairy Alternatives “Chicken” Seitan Posted on February 10, 2012March 14, 2014 by My Vegan Cookbook A lot of seitan recipes tend to be either too soft or too tough. When I started working on this recipe my mission was clear, to make the ultimate seitan “chicken”. The texture is perfection. It’s just the right amount of chewy without being tough. It’s tender without being too soft and so moist. And most importantly it’s bursting with chicken-like flavor. I have a “chicken” salad recipe coming up using this recipe so stay tuned. GO TO “CHICKEN” SEITAN RECIPE> This entry was posted in Recipes. Bookmark the permalink. Post navigation ← Sweet Potato Biscuits Vegan “Chicken” Salad → Recent Posts Black Bean & Corn Salad Vegan 2 Egg Yellow Cake Oil-Free Strawberry Vinaigrette If White Rice is Linked to Diabetes, What About China? 948 Recent Comments Natty Waldo on Vegan Strawberry Cake Natty Waldo on Vegan Strawberry Cake Julie Colley on Mushroom & Lentil Stroganoff Angela on Mushroom & Lentil Stroganoff Fatema Essaji on White Cake Recipe Eric Rogers on Lentil Loaf (Soy/Gluten/Oil/Nut free Version) CC Depp on Vegan “Chicken” Salad Archives November 2016 October 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 January 2015 December 2014 October 2014 August 2014 June 2014 April 2014 March 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 May 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 January 2011 November 2010 October 2010 August 2010 June 2010 May 2010 February 2010 January 2010 December 2009 November 2009 October 2009 September 2009 August 2009 June 2009 May 2009 April 2009 March 2009 February 2009 January 2009 December 2008 November 2008 October 2008 September 2008 August 2008 July 2008 June 2008 May 2008 April 2008 March 2008 February 2008 January 2008 December 2007 Categories Appetizers Crafts & Fun Projects Desserts Food Fun Gardening Guest Blogger Health News Personal Question Recipes Reviews Silly Stuff Trends Uncategorized Meta Register Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Search Recipes MVC’s Facebook Page MVC’s Twitter Page MVC’s Pinterest Page About MVC Contact MVC Original Food Photography & Original Recipe Text Copyright 2007-2014 Josh Latham. All Rights Reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for personal and educational use only. Commercial copying, hiring, lending is prohibited. parchment paper and then foil just to keep it closed. Link Jennifer May 4, 2018, 11:14 am Hi there, I’ve seen in several recipes that you can wrap the seitan in parchment then in foil if you want to keep the food from touching the foil! :O) Link Gen May 21, 2013, 3:18 pm Can’t wait to try this! Silly question but when you say poultry/chicken seasoning, do you mean chicken flavoured seasoning or seasoning/herbs you would usually add to chicken? can’t seem to find vegan chicken flavoured seasoning easily in UK. Thanks very much Link Barb May 21, 2013, 3:20 pm It’s the herbs and spices you would normally add to chicken. Here you can buy it bottled, all mixed together. No need to get a vegan version, they’re all vegan (or should be!) Link website July 25, 2013, 2:34 pm Whoa! This blog looks just like my old one! It’s on a totally different subject but it has pretty much the same layout and design. Great choice of colors! Link Sophie September 13, 2013, 8:25 am I also make my own seitan & love it too! You can make it chewy too! Your chicken style seitan recipe looks like a real winner,…..OOOh yes! Yummmmmmm. Link natalie love October 20, 2013, 3:07 pm hey barb, i am in loooove with this recipe…..soooooo much so iv added a link from my blog to here (i hope thats ok) as i just posted my andalucian seitan and rice recipe in which i use your seitan recipe so i put your recipe as a do it yourself option for people so that they can hopefully get away from the premade sduff lol so i thank you barb keep up the good work 🙂 hope you can pop over and see your recipe being used in a yummy way 🙂 http://loveecoliving.wordpress.com/ …..love and peace, natalie xx Link Barb October 21, 2013, 11:07 am I’m so glad to hear that! 🙂 Link Patty October 27, 2013, 1:39 pm So good!! I’ve tried various homemade seitan recipes before, but always ended up with something that looked like “nasty brains” with an unpleasant gluten aftertaste. Thank you so much for sharing this…wish I’d found it sooner. Now a permanent addition to my kitchen! Link Barb October 31, 2013, 1:52 pm I’m so glad to hear that!! Link Deanna November 11, 2013, 9:50 am I’m about to make this, it’s just me and my husband, can it be frozen? And how long will it keep if refrigerated? Link Barb November 12, 2013, 9:35 am It’ll keep a week or two in the fridge, and for months if you freeze it! Link Lavender Peony December 10, 2013, 1:43 pm Hi Barb, I hope you still get comments from old posts! Thank you for sharing this recipe. I was new to seitan and the couple other recipes I tried before this were just blech! This one has flavour and really great texture! I’ve got a question about the taste, though. The first two batches that I made with your recipe had really good flavour and texture but there was some kind of funky aroma/aftertaste. It was like flour or something in it had gone bad or rancid. I tried it again a few weeks later and that aroma was even stronger. I sniffed my VWG and it seemed to be the culprit. I got a fresh new bag and did the recipe again. The aroma was not as strong but still very faintly there. Is that just the way VWG is? If you don’t mind, could you describe the aromas that you smell as you eat your seitan? If that funkiness I’m smelling is not how it should smell, then I’ll have to play around with the other ingredients – maybe it’s the chickpea flour or something?? Link Barb December 10, 2013, 2:14 pm I’ve never noticed a bad smell.. although it does have kind of an “odd” smell, before it steams. Definitely not bad though. I did some googling and it looks like VWG can go rancid, so maybe that’s what happened? « Seitan & Waffles With Pomegranate Syrup Buffalo Chickpea Pitas With Ranch » February 12th, 2014 Chicken Stylee Seitan Makes 2 pounds Total time: 1 hour || Active time: 10 minutes That isn’t a typo! This is Chicken Styl-ee Seitan. Perfect for where ever someone might use a chicken. I know, people sometimes eat chickens, weird right? PS This recipe was designed for the Seitan & Waffles. But you can use it in anything, of course! Notes ~ For the most chicken-y seitan, use an unchicken broth, like Better Than Bullion brand. Ingredients For the broth: 8 cups vegetable broth 6 cloves garlic, smashed 2 bay leaves For the seitan: 2 cups vital wheat gluten 1/4 cup nutritional yeast 1/4 cup chickpea flour 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons onion powder 1 teaspoon dried sage 1 1/4 cups vegetable broth 1/4 cup soy sauce 2 teaspoons olive oil Directions Fill a stock pot with the broth, smashed garlic and bay leaves, cover and bring to a boil. In the meantime, together the vital wheat gluten, nutritional yeast and chickpea flour and salt in a large bowl. Make a well in the center and add broth, soy sauce, and olive oil. Mix with a fork and then use your hands to knead for about 3 minutes, until it’s a firm dough and everything looks well incorporated. Divide into 8 even pieces. An easy way to do this is to divide the dough in half, then divide those halves and then divide those halves. Ta-da! 8 pieces. Stretch each piece into a cutlet, pressing the cutlet into the counter to smooth the surface. Let rest until the broth has come to a full boil. Once boiling, lower the heat to a simmer. This is important, the broth should not be at a rolling boil or you risk the seitan getting water logged (AKA turning into brains) Add the gluten pieces and partially cover pot so that steam can escape. Let simmer for 45 minutes, turning occasionally. Make sure to keep an eye on the heat, because it may start to boil again, in which case, just turn it down a notch to keep at a slow, steady simmer. When seitan is done, you can let it cool right in the broth, or remove a portion to use right away. Once cooled, keep stored in a tightly covered tupperware container, submerged in broth. Tags: gluten, seitan | Category: Entrees, Featured, Main Featured, Recipe, Recipes Featured, Recipes Main Featured 70 comments to Chicken Stylee Seitan Chels February 12, 2014 at 9:50 pm · Reply Nice. I love the softer texture the mix of chickpea flour & gluten gives seitan. Looking forward to the whole recipe… 😮 Jules February 12, 2014 at 10:11 pm · Reply Do you have a suggestion for the leftover broth? I’ve yet to make my own seitan because I both am uncreative and can’t bring myself to throw out the remaining broth. Thanks, Isa! You rock! Dana February 12, 2014 at 10:22 pm · Reply I have never been able to get the hang of simmered seitan. If I were to steam this, how long should I steam it for? Christy February 13, 2014 at 3:11 pm · Reply Thanks for the recipe Isa! I have been wanting to make my own seitan for some time now and I’ll try this weekend. Could you clarify when the onion powder and sage are added, or does it even matter? Whina February 14, 2014 at 4:25 am · Reply I love this. I made seitan for the first time with this recipe. It was super easy! I don’t know why I use to buy this stuff. The texture and flaour were spot on! Andrea February 16, 2014 at 1:12 pm · Reply Jules- last time I made seitan I used the leftover broth to make the lentil soup in Veganomicon. Alexa February 16, 2014 at 7:35 pm · Reply Found great way to practice my fake-chicken-making skills. I make baked no-chicken nuggets! You know, this werid nuggets made with bird corpses are sometimes extended with starchy stuff, so if my corpse-free nuggets are a bit brainy and starchy, they still taste, well, like nuggets. Just like cheap nuggets or like higher quality nuggets, but it still is what it says. Hell, “everything tastes like chicken”, so why it’s so hard to make a vegan thing tasting like chicken?! It’s not fair. jenn February 16, 2014 at 11:07 pm · Reply Hey Jules, I know you’re asking Isa, but when I make seitan I make the broth into gravy and pour it over the seitan. After you simmer the stuff, take the broth, add some black pepper and taste it. If its bland, add more of the spices you put in the seitan, .5 t of each I’d guess, but I don’t usually measure. Then add 3 Tablespoons flour to a little bit of water in a cup, mix it up till theres no chunks, and add it to the broth. Bring to a boil, 5 min, stirring. Then simmer on lower temp till thick-ish. Turn off heat and let stand 5-10 more min. and it will be all the way thick. Never waste the broth again, make some chicken/garlic gravy for your seitan! ruchama burrell February 18, 2014 at 5:34 am · Reply Thanks to a vegan slow cooker cook book, I’ve found a fool proof way to simmer seitan; on high in the slow cooker for about 3 hours. Works like a charm. I’ve used the left over simmering liquid as liquid for gravy or even to add in place of broth in a stew or soup recipe. Patricia February 18, 2014 at 1:01 pm · Reply Only thing I’d add to what jenn says is that I’d use almond or soy milk instead of water; I’ve found it makes the gravy creamier. Can’t wait to try this seitan recipe. Dana, I use my rice cooker to steam my seitan. The only problem I have with that is I am sometimes tempted to take it out before the timer on the cooker goes off, but that is my own problem. Just make the pieces, wrap in foil, and put in the vegetable rack of a rice cooker, with water in the main part of the cooker for steaming. This works really well for me (as long as I don’t get antsy and take the seitan out before the timer goes off) Heguiberto February 18, 2014 at 11:57 pm · Reply Hi There, I finally got around making this Seitan with excellent result! Will be making more and experimenting with different flavors too. I never knew making this could be so easy. From now on home made seitan it is! Love it. MB February 23, 2014 at 3:51 pm · Reply Made the waffles this morning, very good! Need some time to brown, but neither my husband nor I could eat just one. Had to have more. We are not vegans (yet), just trying some good plant based recipes to improve our health as we age (mid fifties) and SO Glad I found this website! Becca February 23, 2014 at 9:05 pm · Reply Help! It might be because I don’t have my glasses on, but are the sage and onion powder not in the directions? I just tossed them into the dry ingredients and kept my fingers crossed. :/ Amy February 25, 2014 at 1:46 am · Reply Is there a substitute/flavoring alternative for soy sauce? Even if it turns this into another style than chicken. I can’t do soy right now and soy free seitan would be so useful!! Thanks for any suggestions Bree March 2, 2014 at 3:38 pm · Reply Amy, have you tried Bragg’s Liquid Aminos? It tastes better than soy sauce (at least for me, I think it’s more flavorful) and it soy free. I use it in place of soy sauce or tamari. It’s amazing. Seb March 12, 2014 at 10:27 am · Reply Interesting, never thought of mixing the gluten with something else than spices before. Sounds like something I have to try next time 🙂 Thanks for the great recipe! Patricia Sjöberg March 23, 2014 at 10:51 am · Reply I used regular vegetable broth, and it turned out great. I was very careful not to let it boil. Only zombies want brains for dinner. We ate some of it in a broccoli/seitan stir fry with peanut sauce. YUM Janie March 23, 2014 at 3:20 pm · Reply Thank you, thank you, thank you for Isa Does It! I’m cooking my way through and enjoying every single dish….you are an awesome cook and have been my salvation in my vegan lifestyle! NT April 16, 2014 at 8:49 am · Reply This was a success! I didn’t use it for the intended purposes of fried un-chicken though. I marinated small pieces (along with a bunch of veggies), skewered them and stuck the skewers on the grill. Non-veggies loved it too! Grills up very well, and has a great texture. Anyone frozen this successfully after making a large batch? Emma April 21, 2014 at 7:32 pm · Reply Thanks, @Ruchama! Love the slow cooker idea. I’ve always had good luck with Isa’s seitan recipes, but it is kind of a pain to monitor things so the broth doesn’t boil, and given my attention span, I’m always in danger of walking off and doing something else, leaving all my hard work to cook down into brainy mush. Annalise May 6, 2014 at 4:07 am · Reply Isa, I’m a body builder competitor and in the past 4 months I’ve gone vegan, so I’ve been exploring the nutritional background of seitan in all its prep states. I’ve read info about seitan lacking complete aminos and that the simmering broth (with soy) adds the lysine addition. I don’t like that I can’t account for the carb contents of the simmering broths into my macro-counting, so I’ve been adding coconut aminos (I prefer it over actual soy products) to my actual wet ingredient portion of my recipes, then I steam my pieces after I’ve sectioned and weighed the pieces for macro accountability. Am I still achieving the activation and addition of lysine into my process? Kaitlin May 23, 2014 at 6:18 pm · Reply RE: Annalise the Body Builder Hi Annalise, I’m a vegan and also a nutrition student (going for my Registered Dietician’s license!). While I’m not familiar with the amino-profile of coconut aminos, I do know that some lysine is being added to this recipe from the chickpea flour (legumes are good sources of lysine). This website is an excellent resource for anyone interested in vegan protein, and it lists common foods and the essential amino acid composition of each: Lentils are an excellent source of lysine, and I highly recommend Isa’s recipe for Ancho Lentil Tacos here on the PPK! I always make a double batch 🙂 Kaitlin May 23, 2014 at 6:20 pm · Reply RE: Annalise the Body Builder The website didn’t post, sorry! Try Vegan Health (dot) org Zach June 2, 2014 at 3:38 pm · Reply How densely packed should the gluten be in the cup? Is there a weight measurement that I could use instead? christine June 3, 2014 at 10:21 pm · Reply Wow! These were so yummy! We cut them into 1 1/2 in squares to have “chik’n” nuggets, but they expand so much in the water they were like chik’n strips. We will definitely make this recipe a keeper! Pam G June 5, 2014 at 5:28 pm · Reply When I want to make cutlets I roll the dough into a tube shape and use a scissor and cut into the circles and then squish them. works great and you get a nice cutlet shape. Rosalind August 30, 2014 at 4:50 pm · Reply Hello everyone, I have been trying to eat vegan for about 2 months. Although I like edamame and soy nuts could not get used to tofu. Have been seeing recipes for seitan and decided to try this Recipe today. I thought I had ground the chickpeas into flour and measured and threw into mix. after adding the wet ingredients started to mix. Turned out I had tiny little pieces of chickpeas in the dough. Couldn’t threw it away so continued with recipe. When done I took piece out floured,fryed and Made vegan gravy from broth. Poured onto mashed potatoes and could not believe how good this turned out even with mistakes. Ty Ty Ty Now can’t wait to make the sausages. VeganMoFo Day 3: Sizzling Seitan Summer Salad | x means no onions September 4, 2014 at 5:22 am · Reply […] planned to use Isa’s recipe for seitan, which you can find here: http://www.theppk.com/2014/02/chicken-stylee-seitan/ However, due to some grocery related difficulties, I had to punt a bit. Fortunately, I’m […] AK September 9, 2014 at 1:15 am · Reply try using the leftover broth to make risotto the next day. (Seitan-)Huhn mit Pflaumen bzw. Zwetschgen | Hail Seitan! or Can’t believe it’s not that blahblah jesus guy! September 13, 2014 at 2:31 pm · Reply […] “Huhn” stammt in diesem Fall von der wunderbaren Isa Chandra Moscowitz, genauer von hier. Ich war überrascht, wie wunderbar die Konsistenz ausfiel. In keiner Weise wabbelig oder […] Jade September 20, 2014 at 3:33 am · Reply Can you bake it instead? Laura September 29, 2014 at 4:58 pm · Reply Does anyone know if I can use regular flour instead of chickpea flour? I have tons of unbleached all purpose flour and hate to buy chickpea flour for only this recipe. Anyone do this and have good luck with the results? Pam G, when you make the cutlets do you form them into patties before you cook the seitan or once it’s done? White Seitan | Avocados and Ales October 20, 2014 at 8:53 pm · Reply […] has been a good protein source for many of our favorite recipes. The first recipe I tried was chicken seitan by PPK, but despite following the instructions perfectly, I ended up with the dreaded […] Eric October 21, 2014 at 8:37 pm · Reply This sounds good. I’m going to have to try this one. My Fiancee is vegetarian so I’ve been using seitan for some time now and always like new ideas. I have never used chickpea flour before and am excited to taste this one. thanks! Grateful-to-Isa November 20, 2014 at 3:04 am · Reply I made this last night and have not used it in any dish thus far because I have been eating it like jerky. After it came out of the broth, I put it on a foil-lined pan with just a little oil and baked it at 350 for 30-40 mins. I like mine a little on the chewy side. I have been trying to make the perfect seitan since I was in my 20s. I am now in my 40s and I think I’ve finally done it! Thanks so much! Grateful-to-Isa November 20, 2014 at 7:42 pm · Reply Update. I finally ate this the way I was supposed to, in a stew. I figured it would rehydrate in the stew. but many of the pieces were a bit rubbery. It so much more flavorful after it was baked though. I think I’ll bake it 30-40 mins for jerky and either skip the baking altogether or bake for 20 mins at 300-325 to make a stew. lamourah December 22, 2014 at 1:19 am · Reply This seitan fell apart. I have not had this problem before. No sure what the issue is. alice December 30, 2014 at 1:17 pm · Reply What is a good substitute for chickpea flour? I’m allergic to chickpeas Erica January 1, 2015 at 9:21 pm · Reply This is the best out of three recipes I have tried. It is absolutely amazing and I use every time I make Seitan. I make orange chick and sloppy joe’s with the gluten, then I use the broth as a miso; adding tofu, seaweed and green onions. Thank you Post Punk Kitchen! Eibhlin February 28, 2015 at 8:28 pm · Reply mine turned out looking a little “brainy” but sliced and fried for your stroganoff- delicious! Charlotte March 9, 2015 at 8:35 am · Reply Thank you so much for the slow cooker idea, ruchama burrell! This was so easy to make and I can’t wait to have it again! About 3 hours on high in my slow cooker was perfect. I then followed this recipe for yummy smoky maple seitan. http://kblog.lunchboxbunch.com/2012/02/smoky-maple-homemade-seitan-sandwich.html Thanks Isa! Tracie Simons March 17, 2015 at 2:10 pm · Reply I love this recipe. I posted on my blog some recipes I made with it. I linked back to this recipe. I hope that is okay. I love your blog and come here often. I also use the Seiten O’Greatness recipe I found on here years ago. http://betterversionofme-tracie.blogspot.com/2015/03/flexatarian-cooking.html Rahat March 18, 2015 at 2:35 pm · Reply Grain Cooker Technology: The technology mixed up in design rice cookers is far more complex versus the original bamboo baskets. Much advancement has been made over the past few decades and it sounds as if the research is continuing to increase the performance and convenience of this popular appliance. Terri April 1, 2015 at 12:55 am · Reply A love note to this seitan recipe. Thanks Isa! My first homemade seitan! I’m not sure that I nailed it but the texture was great. Seitanfilé – kyckling-ish | Maimiti’s kitchen May 10, 2015 at 4:34 pm · Reply […] är en användbar produkt och jag bestämde mig för att prova en ny variant som skulle användas istället för kyckling när recept påkallade detta. Ganska snart märkte jag […] Vegan Chicken-style Seitan | Love.Peace.Hapiness.Cooking July 10, 2015 at 3:31 pm · Reply […] I wanted to make fried ”chicken” (made of seitan) so I tried a recipe of ”chicken” I found online.. it’s from Post Punk Kitchen, you can find it HERE . […] Jared October 19, 2015 at 2:22 pm · Reply This is the absolute best fake chicken recipe by far. The recipes I’ve found elsewhere and the ones that are usually printed on the vital wheat gluten packaging usually lack flavor or have awful textures. This is the ONLY recipe I use to make fake chicken and I use it all the time. I receive many compliments on this from vegetarians and carnivores alike. Benilana February 21, 2016 at 5:20 am · Reply Oh wow, I just got done making this and it’s SO GOOD! I’ve been thinking of all the ways I could finish it off (tacos, battered nuggets, etc) but I can’t stop eating it straight out of the pot. I went for the slow-cooker method: 3hrs on high. Heavenly. Thank you!!! Dragonfly February 23, 2016 at 12:20 am · Reply I have made many different seitan recipies and this is definitely the best and most flavourful! I used it to add to my slowcooker coconut milk satay stew (with peanut butter, red and green peppers, salsa, onions, soy sauce, lime juice, coriander and ginger!) I love all the other suggestions and als o what a great idea about making the broth into gravy!! I’m going to make chix with biscuits and gravy with the left overs. JHeezy March 21, 2016 at 2:13 pm · Reply I was looking for the garbanzo bean flour in the local Indian grocery, and somehow wires got crossed in my head. Due to the dizzying options of alternate flours, I falsely recalled needing LENTIL flour instead of chickpea. The closest thing they had was yellow split-pea flour, so I bought that. It wasn’t until I was measuring all the ingredients and had the broth on the stove that I realized I bought the wrong flour! So I just used the dahl flour and hoped for the best. Luckily it turned out pretty well. My seitan came out very firm and meaty. It definitely had some denseness and chew — it tasted more like a cross between chicken and beef. If you have had any of the canned meatless products like Worthington, the flavor reminded me of Fri-chik — a chicken sub. It was much better though. I sliced one of the cutlets into “fingers” and dusted the outside with a blackening spice I made up. I then sauteed it in a generous amount of olive oil. When they were crusted accordingly, I coated them with barbecue sauce and let it all carmelize in the pan. It got good crunch and was very flavorful. Last night, I rubbed a couple of the cutlets with jerk seasoning, squeezed a lemon over the whole thing, and covered it with a little broth. I plan on baking those in the oven. I made tofu this way last week, but I think seitan will make a better base. Fingers crossed. Can I just say that this smells AMAZING when it’s cooking to me? I was hungry while making this, and every time I lifted the pot to flip the cutlets I drooled. It’s the sage for sure. JHeezy March 22, 2016 at 1:27 pm · Reply Ok, so the jerk chick’n didn’t come out quite right, but my husband LOVED the flavor. It dried out in the oven, partially because I cooked it on a cooling rack (juices drained away) and partially because I baked them with zero oil. Not on purpose — I completely forgot! Double doh! Next time I will saute. To those who are wondering how to use up the broth, it’s simple. If you are making a grain ( rice, cous cous, quinoa, etc.), greens (cabbage, kale) or a legume/bean (lentils, etc.) as a side dish, cook it in the leftover broth. I used some of my broth to make curried lentils (worked beautifully, and the garlic infusion kept me from having to peel more garlic!), and I plan on using the other leftover broth to make either brown rice or quinoa. The Juice March 25, 2016 at 4:01 pm · Reply Looks fantastic, I will give it a try this weekend. https://betterhomesngardens.wordpress.com/2016/03/16/the-best-juicer-for-juicing/ Epona March 30, 2016 at 3:14 pm · Reply I came across your seitan sausages using a steamer and was wondering….. Could you use a steamer to make other seitan alwell? Surely the only difference between them all is shape? I’ve never used or owned a steamer and before purchasing wanted to have more than one reason – seitan sausages – of having it! Thank you JHeezy March 31, 2016 at 2:12 pm · Reply So yeah, this is my third comment, but I tried the recipe with chickpea flour (as the recipe states) instead of the yellow split-pea flour, and the texture was COMPLETELY different. It was more tender, had less chew, and was much more like commercial seitan. I feel like the flavor of the broth soaked into this batch more than the other — it was more porous and a tad bit spongier. When I sauteed the fresh seitan in a pan, it was crispy on the outside and juicy on the inside — good deal! I am still crafting the perfect mock jerk chicken, but the batch made with this seitan is the clear winner at this point. It was VERY spicy, but man was the texture great! I am starting my own blog soon, so I will write more about it there. Look out for http://www.veggiesoulsista.com! Kev June 21, 2016 at 4:35 am · Reply Delciious! I swapped out onion powder for asofoeteida because I have an intolerance to FODMAPS. But your recipe is awesome. Thanks for sharing it! Southern Fried Seitan – yorkshirevegan August 26, 2016 at 1:43 pm · Reply […] recipes for seitan and I am working my way through them, learning as I go. For this recipe I tried one by Isa Chandra and because it was a big batch I tried a couple of different ways of cooking it. I think either way […] More seitan – yorkshirevegan September 6, 2016 at 12:10 pm · Reply […] The most reliable ones I have found so far for larger pieces, cutlets, kebabs and the like are from Mrs Veg and from Post Punk Kitchen. […] Tallulah September 13, 2016 at 5:27 pm · Reply This tastes amazing!!! Thank you! Does it freeze well? tayne October 20, 2016 at 10:57 pm · Reply the recipe is not showing up on the new website. I swear if its because you want people to buy your recipe book that’s really stupid. admin October 27, 2016 at 4:33 pm · Reply It is showing up. And your comment is extremely rude and disheartening. I’ve shared recipes online for free for over a decade. Stuff like this makes me not really want to. So how about be a nice person and don’t spoil things for others? Tess October 28, 2016 at 11:59 am · Reply The recipe doesn’t show up when you’re on your phone- the only thing that does is all these comments, maybe that’s why the person above got annoyed (a lil over the top tho :D) Mary Jean Kersey October 29, 2016 at 6:16 pm · Reply I cannot get the recipe to show up I am on my computer How do I find it? Thank you Mary Jean Liz October 30, 2016 at 3:12 am · Reply I too am having problems with the recipe showing up. I tried using firefox, safari, and chrome on my computer and then tried using my phone as well and nothing’s working! It would be lovely to make this recipe, could someone help? Thank you Nancy November 1, 2016 at 1:45 am · Reply I just sent an email, but now that I’m at the bottom of the replies, I see that I’m not the only one who can’t see the recipe. I tried on ipad, iphone, and computer. Not showing. Sorry and disappointing to see “admin” respond so aggressively. Mary Jean Kersey November 1, 2016 at 7:47 pm · Reply YEA!!! today the recipe is showing up for me. So thankful and now to get into the kitchen for those waffles and “chicken” Icahlua December 10, 2016 at 4:14 pm · Reply The recipe has disappeared? 🙁 Barbara April 30, 2017 at 2:41 pm · Reply I think this is going to be amazing. I’m steaming mine (because apparently I’m incapable of simmering based on past attempts). One thing I noticed is that the onion powder and sage in the ingredient list don’t show up in the actual how-to. I’m going to assume those go in with the dry ingredients, but sadly I didn’t notice them until after I’d kneaded…so I may have seitan with sage and onion powder stripes 🙂 Glenis Vaillancourt July 18, 2017 at 5:00 am · Reply I use the left over simmering broth to make a really delicious gravy Monique September 28, 2017 at 2:27 pm · Reply Hi Isa, Although my English isn’t too great (I’m from the Netherlands), I’d really like to thank you for this wonderful recipe! This was my first attempt at creating seitan in a bro About Us Search DOWNLOAD FOOD MONSTER APP Get our Newsletter! Animal Monster Food Monster : Recipes Features Industry Buzz Monster Life Monster Earth Monster Welcome Green Monsters! We’re your online guide to making conscious choices that help people, animals and the planet. Download food monster: the biggest, baddest, yummiest vegan food app! Buy the #EatForThePlanet book Food Monster – Features How to Make Perfect Seitan 26k Total Shares Rhea Parsons May 19, 2017 187 Comments LIKE OGP ON FACEBOOK : I may get a ton of email asking me questions about how to best prepare tofu, but it’s nothing compared to the number of people who write with questions and frustrations about making homemade seitan. Seitan (pronounced say-tan), also known as “wheat meat” or gluten is one of people’s favorite vegan meats. It’s extremely versatile – it can be made with a multitude of flavors and textures. Seitan can be made to taste similar to beef, pork or chicken; the texture can be soft like pot roast or as firm as a cutlet or steak. Seitan is a great source of protein and is low in calories. If you have ever eaten a vegan “chicken” or “beef” dish in a Chinese restaurant or one of the many vegan meat products available, you have probably had seitan. You can buy pre-made seitan in the refrigerated section of many supermarkets and health food stores, but it is less expensive to just make your own. Some people make seitan completely from scratch, rinsing the starch from wheat flour to get to the gluten. Luckily, we can also buy a bag of vital wheat gluten so that part is already done for us. Making your own seitan means you get to choose what flavors and spices go into it. Then you can add which texture you want it to have. Don’t be intimidated! With these tips, you will be able to make perfect seitan and the most delicious meat-free meals of your life. 1. The Basic Ingredients Technically, all you need to make seitan is vital wheat gluten and water. But no one wants to sit down to a dish of pasty, flavorless dough. Many seitan recipes include some chickpea or garbanzo flour which is used to give the seitan a lighter texture. This can also be done by adding nutritional yeast with the added benefit of lots of vitamins. The most common wet ingredients used in seitan are water, vegetable broth, olive oil and tamari, soy sauce or liquid aminos. Together, these dry and wet ingredients will be combined to make the seitan dough. Seitan that is chewier, such as ribs, requires less liquid than the soft, tender seitan you would want for a stew like this Seitan and Mushroom Bourguignon. 2. Season Inside and Out As with any meat you would prepare, seitan needs to be seasoned. One of the advantages of making your own seitan is that you can season it from the inside as well as on the outside. If I want my seitan to have a “beefy” flavor, I add tomato paste to the dough. Sometimes I also add vegan Worcestershire sauce for that deep umami flavor. Then I choose herbs and spices associated with beef such as cumin, coriander, oregano, and paprika. Vegan “beefy” broth can also be used instead of vegetable broth to further boost the “beefy” flavor. On the other hand, if I want my seitan to be more like chicken, pork or just more neutral, I will use vegan “chicken” flavored broth and herbs such as thyme and sage. After the seitan is made, it gets more seasoning depending on how I am going to prepare it. You do not want to eat seitan without cooking it somehow. At the very least, saute the seitan in some oil to give it a nice crust and added flavor. Chunks of seitan for a stew will get browned in seasoned flour before adding any liquids. Sliced seitan gets seasoned with garlic powder, celery salt, black pepper and cayenne when I am making a French Dip sandwich. Seitan ribs and steaks are flavored with spice rubs and/or marinades. Food is all about texture and flavor, so be generous when it comes to seasoning your seitan. You might even choose to flavor your seitan with whiskey and pineapple to make these Pineapple Jack BBQ Sandwiches. 3. You Need to Knead Seitan is a dough, and like most dough, it needs to be kneaded. Kneading helps develop the gluten and brings elasticity and stretch into the dough. The longer you knead the dough, the more gluten you develop leading to a chewier seitan. If you want a less chewy and more tender seitan, knead it for a shorter period of time. Most recipes require kneading the dough for an average of 3 minutes, followed by a 10-minute rest period and then a bit more kneading. As you knead the seitan, you will feel it change from a wet, sticky mixture to firmer dough; that is the gluten developing. You will be able to stretch the dough and watch it snap back into place; that is the elasticity. 4. Simmering Seitan The most traditional method of making seitan, and probably the one everyone tries first, is simmering. Simmering may be the method of choice for tender, less chewy seitan. In my opinion, it is also the method that people seem to have the most trouble with. The key is to keep the water at a simmer. If the water is boiling, the seitan will become spongy, soft and jiggly…sort of like meaty jello. Yuck. Keep the broth at a gentle simmer and your seitan will develop the proper texture. Simmering involves combining ¼ cup of soy sauce with enough water and broth to fill a pot with 8 cups of liquid. Some of this liquid will be absorbed into the seitan so you want it to be flavorful. Bring the liquid to a rolling boil and then bring it down to a simmer. Add the gluten to the pot and cover it partially, letting steam escape. Let the seitan simmer for 45 minutes, turning it in the broth every so often. Remove the lid, turn the heat off and let the seitan swim in the broth for another 15 minutes. Carefully remove the seitan from the broth with a strainer spoon or tongs and let it drain in a colander until it is cool enough to handle. You can then use the seitan however you want but I think it tastes best the next day. Refrigerate the seitan in its cooled broth in a storage container. It will keep for up to ten days. You can also freeze the seitan for up to three months. The broth, which is full of flavor, can be used when cooking the seitan to make sauces and gravies. Use this method to make the seitan for this “Chicken” Green Chile and Hominy Posole or my Seitan Pot Roast. 5. Steaming Seitan Steaming is the method I use most when making seitan for sandwiches, cutlets, and steaks. I also use it for making vegan sausages. Cooking the seitan in this method makes it firm and chewy and I don’t need to make a huge vat of flavored broth. To steam seitan, place the kneaded dough on a cutting board and divide into however many pieces of seitan you are making. You can make half a dozen thin cutlets, four thick steaks or even one big log that you can cut up or slice later. Just shape each piece of dough the way you want it. Wrap each piece a bit loosely in a piece of aluminum foil – loosely because the seitan will expand as it steams and you don’t want it to burst. If you are concerned about aluminum foil touching your food, you can use parchment paper or a layer of parchment paper under the foil. The foil is extra important when making something like sausages or a log that requires the strength of the wrapper to help keep its shape. Place the foil packets in a steamer basket that is sitting atop a large pot of boiling water. Steam the seitan for 30 minutes. If you are making more than four packets, you might want to do this in batches so the steamer isn’t too crowded and each packet has room to expand. Remove the packets from the steamer and let cool before transferring them to the refrigerator for a few hours but preferably, overnight in a container. Bring the seitan back to room temperature before cooking with it. Use this method for making this Vegan Gutbuster Sausage Sandwich or my Seitan Steak in Beurre Blanc Sauce. 6. Baking Seit

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Recipes so delicious you’ll never think twice!
My Favorite (“Chicken-style”) Seitan Recipe
by Barb on January 30, 2012

Updated: Hello seitan lovers! I’ve updated the pictures and added a nice printable recipe. If you’re looking for the old “step-by-step” pictures, they’re waaaay at the bottom. Enjoy!

Seitan is probably my favorite meat-substitute, not only because its texture is almost exactly how I remember meat to be, but because it’s delicious and so versatile. I make a batch about once a month and use it on pizza, sandwiches and sometimes in my tofu scrambles. It’s excellent for veganizing recipes left over from my “pregan” days as you can sub it in for any meat. This recipe was adapted from Terry Hope Romero’s Steamed White Seitan recipe in Viva Vegan!, which was my first all-vegan cookbook. Her recipe was meant to simulate chicken or pork, but I think you can use it for pretty much anything.

I know you can buy more and more seitan products at the store, but I really believe that home made is best. Not quickest, certainly… and yes, making your own does mean you have to clean your kitchen afterward, BUT I find the texture and the flavor to be far superior.
Seriously you guys, I snack on this stuff straight up- no sauces, no additional seasonings, nothing. Deelish!

 

I also made a few small adjustments to the recipe… You know, now that I’ve been making it once a month for like 3 years…

 

My Favorite (“Chicken-style”) Seitan Recipe

Serves 8

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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
45 min
Ingredients
1.5 cups cold chick’n or vegetable broth (or water and bouillon cube)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1.5 cups vital wheat gluten flour
1/4 cup chickpea flour
1/3 cup nutritional yeast
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1.5 teaspoons poultry or chicken seasoning
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 to 1 tablespoon sea salt (I used a full tablespoon, but I love salt. Some people have found it to be a bit much)
Aluminum foil
Instructions
Wisk together broth and olive oil, and set aside.
In a large bowl stir together all the remaining ingredients. Once they’re completely combined, create a well in the center, then pour in the broth mix
Stir with a rubber spatula until the entire mixture pulls away from the sides of the bowl. Now it’s time to knead!
Knead the dough for 2-3 minutes. Your hands may get tired but this step is crucial to develop the gluten. You’ll actually be able to see the dough’s consistency change, it’s pretty cool! You can knead in the same bowl, or you can move it to a cutting board (you’ll have to do that later anyway). Keep in mind as you’re kneading that you’re going to be cutting it into 4 loaves, so working it into a square/rectangle is better than a roundish lump.
Let it rest for about 10 minutes, then knead for another 30 seconds. This is your last chance to get it into a workable shape for cutting. Move to the cutting board if you haven’t already, and slice into 4 equal sized loaves.
From your box of aluminum foil, tear off 4 pieces, each about 6 inches wide. Wrap each piece of seitan by folding the long edges, and then the short edges. You want the loaf to be completely covered, but with room to expand, so don’t make it too tight.
Steam for 30 minutes. If you don’t have a steamer, you can use my ghetto-fabulous method. I fill a pot with about an inch of water, and heat it to boiling. I put the foil-wrapped loaves into a metal colander, which I place into the pan (make sure the water level is lower than the loaves themselves, you don’t want them to get wet) and cover. If you’re using my method, and the loaves are at all stacked, you should switch them around about halfway through.
Remove from the steamer and let cool for 30 minutes or so before putting it in the fridge for at least an hour. Then you can wrap in plastic wrap or zippie bags.
Notes
Makes 4 loaves, each of which makes about 2 servings. Wrapped tightly, it’ll last in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Freeze it, and it’ll last for months.
Please don’t try my steaming-in-the-colander method unless your colander is metal!
By Barb@ThatWasVegan
Adapted from Viva Vegan!
Here’s the old version of the recipe, with photos!

“Chicken-Style” Seitan (4 loaves, each makes about 2 servings)
Recipe adapted from Viva Vegan! Wrapped tightly, it’ll last in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Freeze it, and it’ll last for months.
Ingredients:
1.5 cups cold chick’n or vegetable broth (or water and bouillon cube)
2 T olive oil
1.5 cups vital wheat gluten flour
1/4 cup chickpea flour
1/3 cup nutritional yeast
1 t garlic powder
1.5 t poultry or chicken seasoning
1/2 t paprika
1/2 t cumin
1/2 t onion powder
1/2 to 1 T Herbamere or sea salt (I used a full tablespoon, but I love salt. Some people have found it to be a bit much)
Aluminum foil
Directions:
1. Wisk together broth and olive oil, and set aside.
2. In a large bowl stir together all the remaining ingredients. Once they’re completely combined, create a well in the center, then pour in the broth mix.

3. Stir with a rubber spatula until the entire mixture pulls away from the sides of the bowl. Now it’s time to knead!
4. Knead the dough for 2-3 minutes. Your hands may get tired but this step is crucial to develop the gluten. You’ll actually be able to see the dough’s consistency change, it’s pretty cool! You can knead in the same bowl, or you can move it to a cutting board (you’ll have to do that later anyway). Keep in mind as you’re kneading that you’re going to be cutting it into 4 loaves, so working it into a square/rectangle is better than a roundish lump. This was mine, about halfway through and before I transferred it to a cutting board…

5. Let it rest for about 10 minutes, then knead for another 30 seconds. This is your last chance to get it into a workable shape for cutting. Move to the cutting board if you haven’t already, and slice into 4 equal sized loaves.
6. From your box of aluminum foil, tear off 4 pieces, each about 6 inches wide. Wrap each piece of seitan by folding the long edges, and then the short edges. You want the loaf to be completely covered, but with room to expand.
7. Steam for 30 minutes. If you don’t have a steamer, you can use my ghetto-fabulous method. I fill a pot with about an inch of water, and heat it to boiling. I put the foil-wrapped loaves into a metal colander, which I place into the pan (make sure the water level is lower than the loaves themselves, you don’t want them to get wet) and cover.

 

If you’re using my method, and the loaves are at all stacked, you should switch them around about halfway through.
8. Remove from the steamer and let cool for 30 minutes or so before putting it in the fridge for at least an hour. Then you can wrap in plastic wrap or zippie bags.
Enjoy!

 

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Bianca- Vegan Crunk January 30, 2012, 11:03 am
I love steamed seitan! It’s so delicious!
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Barb January 30, 2012, 1:32 pm
Me too! Since I made this last batch I’ve had it on pizza, and chopped up and mixed with taco seasoning, sprinkled on my salad!
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gail January 30, 2012, 12:13 pm
i’ve always thought about trying to make seitan – you make it look easy 🙂 can’t wait for your cake recipe too!
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Barb January 30, 2012, 1:33 pm
Thanks!!
I can’t wait to share it! I also can’t wait to get home from work and have another piece 🙂
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Reia January 30, 2012, 10:50 pm
I love how you incorporated the step by step pics this time. It’s a huge help for people like me who aren’t as comfortable in the kitchen as others, and like to have visual confirmation that things are going as they should! I’ve only tried making my own seitan once, but the recipe was very different, so I will have to give this one a shot.
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Barb January 31, 2012, 1:33 pm
I like having visual confirmation too! Unfortunately, now that I’m on this end, it’s not always the most convenient process…
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Vegan Thyme (Kelly) January 31, 2012, 8:16 pm
Excellent! What a great play-by-play photo job! I love this post as it reminds me why it is way too easy for me to linger in Whole Foods over all the “seitan” pre-packaged options and end up with them in my cart vs. making my own! I have that cookbook and love it! I need to get “satan” making!
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Barb February 4, 2012, 6:33 pm
It’s amazing how easy it actually is. I still sometimes buy the pre-made, but then always regret it…
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Heather February 1, 2012, 8:31 am
Your ghetto fabulous method is perfect for steaming! You make, making seitan look so easy, I have to try this method!
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Barb February 4, 2012, 6:34 pm
If you do, let me know how it turns out!
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Natalie March 11, 2012, 10:59 am
What if I want to eat right away? Do I have to put it in the fridge? Can’t this be eaten warm?
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Barb March 11, 2012, 12:08 pm
The time in the fridge helps it to firm up, so if you ate it right away it would probably have a different consistency.
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Connie Fletcher May 5, 2012, 12:26 pm
Barb, go to Planeat.com it’s a video and has recipes from some folks, one s for Seitan Brisket by Chad Sarno….it’s driving me nutz, cuz I made it and it didn’t work out. See what you think, cuz the flavor is out of this world…..really delish, but (and it’s a BIG but…no, not that kind…) it didn’t hold together and it’s soo smooshy….yuck…but the flavor is stunning….Help??!!??
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Connie Fletcher May 7, 2012, 6:43 am
Actually, I tried to go to Planeat. om ad it didn’t work, so I googled Planeatmovie and it took me to the right site. Please help me…someone..this is really worth trying………
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Barb May 11, 2012, 4:45 pm
I’ll add it to my “to make” list, it does sound good! I have to warn you though, it’s a pretty long list 🙂 Seriously… I spend way too much time dreaming up new recipes to work on, not to mention pinning and bookmarking other people’s recipes I want to try! But I promise to get back to you when I do!
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Connie Fletcher May 11, 2012, 4:57 pm
Thank you….I think it will be worth your while. The flavor is really great, but the texture……..not so much. Again, thank you!
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Moonrivers June 15, 2012, 7:38 pm
Any reason in particular to using chickpea flour as opposed to something like teff or soy or some other kinds of flour? I always buy different flours for different recipes and sometimes forget what flour is for what recipe so I’ve got too many kinds of flour.
I’ve always got to question things, I know. Have you ever tried teff flour?
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Barb June 18, 2012, 10:49 am
The reason is simply that it’s my flour of choice. I’ve never tried it with other types, if I were you I’d google recipes that call for a flour you’d rather use.
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Claire September 12, 2015, 2:44 am
I made it tonight and I had to substitute a few things for what I had because I didn’t want to go to the store. Used seasoning that goes on poultry instead of poultry seasoning. Used white flour instead of chickpea. It turned out great.
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Barb September 16, 2015, 7:50 am
Great! I’m glad to hear it worked with regular flour, I’ve never tried that!
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Claire September 12, 2015, 2:46 am
I also battered it with egg and flour and pan fried it and damn. I grew up eating chicken breaded that way and I really .missed it
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Sarah July 16, 2012, 3:15 pm
I made this seitan yesterday and used it in a recipe today. It was the BEST I have ever made and I’m pretty sure I can use it in place of the crazy pricey tofurky deli slices my kid has been eating. And a helluva lot healthier. THANK YOU!!!
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Barb July 17, 2012, 5:24 am
You’re so welcome, and I’m super happy to hear that it works for you!
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johnrpotter August 16, 2012, 4:05 pm
This is the best seitan recipe thus far!!!! I have to say I try to avoid the whole mock meat issue, however my kids enjoyed the chicken nuggets I made with this and I am currently cooking a second batch to try my hand at a mock chicken salad.
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Barb August 16, 2012, 5:11 pm
I’m so happy to hear that!! I don’t buy a lot of the mock meats either, I mostly stick with tofu (or just veggies), but I really enjoy home made seitan.
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Taylor September 13, 2012, 10:32 am
Amazing recipe! Do you know the nutrition facts?
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Barb September 13, 2012, 11:49 am
I’m sorry, I never tabulated them. It’s on my “list” to start doing that for recipes, though. Sorry!
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Jane September 20, 2012, 6:50 am
Hi Barb,
This look delish. Can you tell me, what brand of chicken seasoning did you use? I am thinking that depending on the brand, there could be a lot of variation in sodium content and if my seasoning has more salt, I might want to cut down on the amount of salt I add to the recipe.
Thanks!
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Barb September 20, 2012, 6:54 am
It was the Sunflower Farmer’s Market brand, which probably doesn’t help you much. Sorry!
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Timi Caswell February 23, 2013, 2:57 pm
Hands down, the BEST seitan recipe I’ve tried! I almost gave up on making it from scratch but you renewed my faith. Thank you, thank you!!!!
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Barb February 25, 2013, 11:43 am
You’re welcome, and I’m so glad it worked out for you! 🙂
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malbertini February 24, 2013, 6:40 pm
This recipe is fantastic! Thank you for giving me a new staple to work with. (I’ll never go back to store-bought!)
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Barb February 25, 2013, 11:42 am
You’re welcome, and THANK YOU!
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Joshua March 3, 2013, 2:59 pm
Wow! I’m really impressed by this recipe – I had it on my list of things to make for a while now, but overestimated the difficulty and underestimated the deliciousness. Last time I tried making homemade seitan, I boiled it in broth and the flavor didn’t really come out that well, and this is an amazingly different thing! Thank you so much for posting this!
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Barb March 4, 2013, 9:16 am
Thanks for the great feedback! I made some myself yesterday, and it truly is my FAVORITE!
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Choy soo Ying March 28, 2013, 1:33 am
I cannot find vital wheat gluten where I live in Malaysia. Is there a way to make ones own? I really would like to make my own seitan as I also cannot find this . Thank you for whatever suggestions.
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Barb March 28, 2013, 10:17 am
I would recommend buying it online, perhaps through Amazon? I’m not aware of any ways to make your own, sorry. Good luck!
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Ashley April 2, 2013, 12:00 pm
I made this before and had a question on the recipe. I used one tablespoon of sea salt as the recipe suggested. It turned out way too salty, was that a typo? I’m thinking one teaspoon may be more appropriate.
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Barb April 4, 2013, 7:08 am
No, I meant a Tablespoon, but I tend to love salt more than other people 😉 I just edited it to add that some people might prefer less, thanks for the feedback!
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April April 8, 2013, 9:35 pm
Would it work if I use parchment paper instead of aluminum foil and just fold it well?? Has anyone tried it? I try to avoid aluminum touching my food, and I like the safer non-stick properties of the parchment paper.
Thank you so much for this recipe! I tried making seitan with another recipe once and it wasn’t even edible, and was a TON of work and mess to clean up. This looks easy and like it would be more flavorful too! Can’t wait to try it!
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Barb April 9, 2013, 2:23 pm
I’m really not sure… you’d have to do something to make sure the paper doesn’t come unwrapped…
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April April 9, 2013, 3:09 pm
Tell me if you think this would work…..wrapping the seitan loafs in parchment paper using a burrito type fold and having the loose edge sitting on the bottom so it doesn’t open….??
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Barb April 10, 2013, 1:40 pm
I think that would work, but you do need to flip them halfway through. Perhaps by then the steam will be holding the parchment paper together better? Let me know how it turns out!
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April April 10, 2013, 4:05 pm
Ahhh yes. I forgot about that part. Maybe I could use something like a small plate to weight them down if needed to keep them closed at that point? Or would that make for extra ugly seitan? LOL I will let you know how it goes for sure. Thanks for all your help!
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April May 20, 2013, 9:32 am
Update- What turned out to be easiest for me was to wrap in parchment paper and then foil just to keep it closed.
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Jennifer May 4, 2018, 11:14 am
Hi there, I’ve seen in several recipes that you can wrap the seitan in parchment then in foil if you want to keep the food from touching the foil! :O)
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Gen May 21, 2013, 3:18 pm
Can’t wait to try this! Silly question but when you say poultry/chicken seasoning, do you mean chicken flavoured seasoning or seasoning/herbs you would usually add to chicken? can’t seem to find vegan chicken flavoured seasoning easily in UK. Thanks very much
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Barb May 21, 2013, 3:20 pm
It’s the herbs and spices you would normally add to chicken. Here you can buy it bottled, all mixed together. No need to get a vegan version, they’re all vegan (or should be!)
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website July 25, 2013, 2:34 pm
Whoa! This blog looks just like my old one! It’s on a totally different subject but it has pretty much the same layout and design. Great choice of colors!
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Sophie September 13, 2013, 8:25 am
I also make my own seitan & love it too! You can make it chewy too!
Your chicken style seitan recipe looks like a real winner,…..OOOh yes! Yummmmmmm.
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natalie love October 20, 2013, 3:07 pm
hey barb, i am in loooove with this recipe…..soooooo much so iv added a link from my blog to here (i hope thats ok) as i just posted my andalucian seitan and rice recipe in which i use your seitan recipe so i put your recipe as a do it yourself option for people so that they can hopefully get away from the premade sduff lol so i thank you barb keep up the good work 🙂 hope you can pop over and see your recipe being used in a yummy way 🙂 http://loveecoliving.wordpress.com/ …..love and peace, natalie xx
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Barb October 21, 2013, 11:07 am
I’m so glad to hear that! 🙂
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Patty October 27, 2013, 1:39 pm
So good!! I’ve tried various homemade seitan recipes before, but always ended up with something that looked like “nasty brains” with an unpleasant gluten aftertaste. Thank you so much for sharing this…wish I’d found it sooner. Now a permanent addition to my kitchen!
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Barb October 31, 2013, 1:52 pm
I’m so glad to hear that!!
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Deanna November 11, 2013, 9:50 am
I’m about to make this, it’s just me and my husband, can it be frozen? And how long will it keep if refrigerated?
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Barb November 12, 2013, 9:35 am
It’ll keep a week or two in the fridge, and for months if you freeze it!
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Lavender Peony December 10, 2013, 1:43 pm
Hi Barb,
I hope you still get comments from old posts! Thank you for sharing this recipe. I was new to seitan and the couple other recipes I tried before this were just blech! This one has flavour and really great texture! I’ve got a question about the taste, though. The first two batches that I made with your recipe had really good flavour and texture but there was some kind of funky aroma/aftertaste. It was like flour or something in it had gone bad or rancid. I tried it again a few weeks later and that aroma was even stronger. I sniffed my VWG and it seemed to be the culprit. I got a fresh new bag and did the recipe again. The aroma was not as strong but still very faintly there.
Is that just the way VWG is? If you don’t mind, could you describe the aromas that you smell as you eat your seitan? If that funkiness I’m smelling is not how it should smell, then I’ll have to play around with the other ingredients – maybe it’s the chickpea flour or something??
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Barb December 10, 2013, 2:14 pm
I’ve never noticed a bad smell.. although it does have kind of an “odd” smell, before it steams. Definitely not bad though. I did some googling and it looks like VWG can go rancid, so maybe that’s what happened? http://www.livestrong.com/article/340714-how-long-will-vital-wheat-gluten-last/
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Lavender Peony December 10, 2013, 11:53 pm
How wonderful of you to reply to such an old post – thank you! Okay, that settles it then. I got a fresh new bag of VWG and got that same funky aroma. It must be one of the other ingredients. I’ll keep trying the recipe! Thanks again Barb!
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Jeanette Short January 27, 2018, 1:09 am
Could the funky taste come from the nutritional yeast?
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Dennis December 12, 2013, 12:24 am
I make steamed seitan pepperoni! And this is exactly my technique! I too use the colander and pot method. It works great. The steamed texture ends up the best I have found so far. When I make pepperoni I roll the seitan in a roll instead in the foil so I can make slices. The foil makes the final product hold its shape.
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Barb December 12, 2013, 8:35 am
I’ve been messing around with a new sausage seitan recipe, and I love the way the foil helps it hold it’s shape!
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removalswithbsr.Com February 16, 2014, 5:09 am
whoah this blog is magnificent i love studying
your posts. Stay up the good work! You already know, a lot of persons are hunting round for this information, you can aid them greatly.
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Deborrah April 9, 2014, 4:09 am
Barb, do you know where to order vital wheat gluten in amounts larger than the one pound Bob’s Red Mill package? That’s all I’ve been able to find locally. Goes too fast and costs too much per serving.
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Barb April 9, 2014, 7:48 am
Have you looked online? Amazon or veganessentials.com maybe. I usually buy it in bulk from whole foods or sprouts.
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DBRooks April 9, 2014, 9:49 pm
I buy it in 25 bags at a local whole foods type place. It is expensive but cheaper. It tends to last my family of five approx 6 mo.
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Deborrah July 10, 2014, 10:48 pm
Guess what!? I found a 5 lb bag which is the perfect size for me (since I’m the only one eating vegan around here) from a site called http://www.healthy-eating.com. Their product is called Instant Gluten Flour. I got 5 lbs for $21 which is far less expensive than the $9 for one pound the Whole Foods charges for Bob’s. I am in gluten heaven and about to get up and make myself a batch.
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teresa watts June 27, 2014, 4:19 pm
I’m making mine now. I did use more seasonings of the turkey gravy recipe I have on hand. it is much to make with spices, yet is the closet by far turkey taste I have come across yet. I use it for any white mock out there. from gravies, to broth, and to even season salt veggies. anyway, thank you so much for posting this.. my first time making. I normally just go with the smoothies, juices, and veggies of all. this recipe just looks too good to pass up without trying.
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Barb July 10, 2014, 10:31 am
That’s a great idea!
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Cynthia C. August 23, 2014, 4:17 pm
This was my first time making Seitan and your recipe was right on the mark! It was delicious and I enjoyed the texture and the wonderful chicken-like flavor because of the poultry seasoning/herbs. I added a celery stalk, carrots, a bit of bouillon powder and a bay leaf to my steaming water just for extra flavor. I didn’t have chickpea flour and was at a loss on how to substitute for it — so oddly enough I added 1/4 c. panko crumbs and the taste and texture of the Seitan still came out perfect! I will now be making your recipe instead of purchasing the tasteless and expensive varieties at my local health food store. I am trying to eat a mostly plant-based diet — and wonderful recipes like yours make it easier and tastier to live a vegetarian lifestyle. Thank you!
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Barb August 23, 2014, 5:33 pm
I’m so happy to hear that!! And great idea about the panko crumbs. Funny how we can make these last minute substitutions, and sometimes they work out perfectly. Good luck with the plant-based eating!!!
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veggie girl January 24, 2015, 11:16 pm
I just made your updated recipe and it is the best seitan that I have ever made. The steaming method makes all the difference! This seitan works so well for “chik’n” nuggets. I was so impressed with the taste and also the ease of cooking it. It’s my new go to recipe. I used parchment paper instead of foil to steam in and it worked very well. Thank you Thank you Thank you!!
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Barb January 26, 2015, 10:20 am
I’m so happy to hear you loved it!!
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Bianka B February 15, 2015, 10:31 am
Hi! I made seitan for the first time and used your recipe and method 🙂 It tastes and has the same texture like the store bought one I once tried before. Amazing! I must teach this to my mum, because her version is very gum-like. I used the seitan in lentil veggie loaf and in stuffed mushrooms, very good!
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Barb February 17, 2015, 9:01 am
That makes me so happy to hear!! 🙂
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Wanda May 5, 2015, 9:08 am
Can I make this without the aluminum foil? I am trying to avoid having my food in contact with aluminum during cooking.
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Barb May 5, 2015, 9:38 am
You need it to be wrapped in something, because it’s very soft. Parchment paper might work, but I haven’t tried it.
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joshu May 5, 2015, 10:07 am
I ran into the same problem when making a gluten-based veggie sausage, and found that wrapping the dough in undyed flourcloth towels and using these little silicone zip ties works wonderfully and I don’t have to worry about making more waste. This approach might work here too, though you may have to experiment with cook time if you make it into one long sausage of dough.
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Barb May 5, 2015, 10:11 am
Interesting! Wanda, if you try it, let us know if it worked!
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Gen May 5, 2015, 1:17 pm
I’ve been really enjoying this recipe for a while now! Once I ran out of foil so used a clean damp tea towel (or I guess you call them dish towels in the US?!) to wrap the seitan in to steam in one big loaf. Make sure the towel doesn’t smell strongly of laundry detergent or your seitan will too! Probably the flour cloth towels mentioned above would be better. Not sure on exact time for one batch as I tend to double the recipe (it’s so good!) and use a double steamer, shuffling them about a bit so evenly cooks. I would say it’s probably about double the time to cook so around an hour. Does take a bit of experimentation to get the right amount of time and you need to make sure the middle is cooked. I turn it over half way too. Worth a try if you don’t want to use foil!
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Frances May 10, 2015, 7:27 pm
Oh my heavenly days! I tried your recipe today and the results were fantastic! This is only the second time I’ve ever made seitan, and the recipe and cooking method was spot on. The one thing I did that was different was to add cayenne pepper (’cause I’m a spicy kinda gal…), but other than that, I stayed true to your recipe. And, like you, I found myself just slicing it and eating it once it was done. The seitan has wonderful texture and…and…and…well? It’s just brilliant. Well done, and thank youuu!!
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Barb May 11, 2015, 8:05 am
Yay! I love feedback like this, it makes me so happy to know people are using and loving my recipes 🙂
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AnnMarie May 11, 2015, 1:34 pm
Just made this again yesterday- STILL love it!
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Mary July 20, 2015, 4:14 pm
Why not one big loaf? I’m trying it in a counter top steamer. One large loaf.
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Barb July 21, 2015, 1:12 pm
Might be hard to cook all the way through, but I’m curious to hear how it turned out!
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Phil August 23, 2015, 11:09 am
Hi, i can’t thank you enough for this recipe : ) i’ve been trying and failing to make restaurant style seitan for ages. I could eat this all day. Thank you : )
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Barb August 24, 2015, 8:26 am
I love hearing that! So glad you like it!
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Lys September 1, 2015, 9:45 pm
This was my first time making seitan… Wow! I am impressed that I was able to make something so yummy and good for me! I did the seasonings to my own liking (less cumin, more garlic, a dash of liquid smoke, etc) so it probably didn’t have the same “chicken” taste as yours. But it was still amazing over avocado on a bagel. This is gonna be one of my new rotating recipes (:
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Geet September 13, 2015, 11:07 am
Is wheat gluten flour is different than a whole wheat flour??? If so, where can I buy it. I stay in india.
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Barb September 16, 2015, 7:49 am
It’s ‘vital wheat gluten’ and yes, it’s definitely very different from whole wheat flour. If stores in India don’t carry it, you can definitely buy it online!
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Rosie October 10, 2015, 8:34 am
wow I’ve never seen so many comments on a post I want to try this. Every time I’ve made seitan it comes out rubbery with a capital R!!! I wonder why this one does not what is the secret….
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ashley December 13, 2015, 6:26 am
Can this be baked or only steamed?
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Barb December 15, 2015, 1:15 pm
I’ve never tried baking it, sorry!
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Simon February 5, 2016, 5:19 am
Can I and how would I heat this up after refrigeration/freezing?
Thanks 🙂
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Barb February 7, 2016, 7:09 am
Use it the way you would any other mock meat- you can fry it in a pan, crumble it in your food processor, slice it thin got sandwiches. Anything! I have tons of recipes using it if you need ideas.
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MHC April 4, 2016, 10:06 am
Found your recipe from a link elsewhere. It really is great. My first time making my own seitan. I tried two recipes. The first was the one on on the Bob’s Red Mill package which took a long time and turned out spongey. Yours is easier, faster and much firmer. Tasty too. This is a classic, thanks.
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Barb April 4, 2016, 10:38 am
Thank you, I’m glad to hear that!!
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Laura April 10, 2016, 3:32 am
Thank you for this recipe! Where I live seitan is pretty hard to find and the ones I’ve bought have been quite expensive and not that tasty. I didn’t realize seitan was so easy to make and turned out very good, definitely will be doing this again 🙂
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Barb April 11, 2016, 3:11 pm
I love this feedback, thank you!
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Hank June 30, 2016, 2:36 pm
Thanks for the recipe! It was super easy to make and very filling, though I think I may have done something wrong – mine seems cooked fully all the way through, but tastes a little doughy.
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Lillian September 25, 2016, 3:03 pm
I have my first two loaves in the steamer right now…I guess my steamer’s a little small because I could only fit half the recipe in it! I did a couple of nibbles of the raw dough and I have to say I’m excited about how this gonna turn out! Also, in case anyone out there wonders, I used 1.5 tsp of Mrs. Dash and dropped the salt down to 1/2 tsp.
I do have to ask just to doublecheck that I did it right – is the dough supposed to be fairly wet when you add all the broth and knead it the first time? It was almost falling apart through my fingers, which is nothing like bread dough (which is the only thing I’m used to kneading!). Is that right? Should I have added more flour?
Lunchtime can’t come fast enough!
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Barb October 1, 2016, 4:14 pm
Hi Lillian, it’s still fairly soft when you first add the liquid, but should firm up as you’re kneading it. How did it turn out?
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nnenna November 1, 2016, 8:49 am
I have been vegan for more than 6 years and this is by far, the best recipe I have made! Wow, wow Wow! thank you!
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Barb November 2, 2016, 9:17 am
Oh my gosh I am so happy to hear that!! It’s one of my favorites too 😊
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Wholistics November 22, 2016, 9:41 am
Is there a way to steam it without aluminum? I want to avoid consuming aluminum whenever possible and if it’s steamed it in , it will leach into the seitan. Any other ideas on how to steam it? Thanks!
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Barb November 22, 2016, 3:33 pm
It’s the only way I’ve done it… Perhaps parchment paper?
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Amanda December 17, 2016, 7:34 pm
Hello Barb,
I haven’t tried this recipe yet (though based on all of the comments it looks like it’ll be amazing when I do), so I was wondering if you’ve ever used this in a casserole. I have a casserole recipe that I used to make prior to being a vegetarian, which called for chicken, and I’ve been wanting to make it, but could never figure out what to use as a substitute for chicken. Thanks! 🙂
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Barb January 4, 2017, 7:46 am
I have, with mixed results. In a “dry” casserole, it’s been fine. One that’s more like stew or soup? Then the seitan got a little soft for my taste. One thing I found that worked was to lightly fry it before adding it, to give it a little crispiness. But if you’re using it in a pasta or cheesy casserole, it should be fine as-is.
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Amanda January 6, 2017, 8:40 pm
Thank you so much for responding! It would be in a casserole that is a bit in between…I know it uses mayonnaise and Swiss cheese as well as onion, celery, and croutons, so I’m thinking that if I pan fry it then it should hold up. Any suggestions for pan frying? (Olive oil, bread it first, how long)…I’ve never cooked with seitan before
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Debbie Lee January 3, 2017, 2:23 pm
Is it possible to substitute something else for the chickpea flour?
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Barb January 3, 2017, 2:39 pm
I’ve never made it any other way, so I can’t say.
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Tony January 7, 2017, 10:36 pm
I just tried this recipe today and it’s amazing! It is far better than most chicken-style tofu or seitan that I’ve had before. I used oat flour instead of chickpea flower and added a bit of pepper. I also doubled the recipe (ended up with 8 small loaves) which I recommend doing because, trust me, you’ll want as much of this as you can get!
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Christina Nuncio January 24, 2017, 6:59 am
I have been looking for a good seitan recipe to make chicken fried chicken and was wondering if it was possible to bread and pan fry this chicken after it steams or will that not work? I am new to seitan, I mad either once as Italian sausage but it wasn’t perfect. Thanks in advance!:)
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Barb January 24, 2017, 8:28 am
You could certainly bread the seitan and fry it, like I did in my spicy chick’n sandwich recipe! I’ve also seen recipes where people wrap the seitan in rice paper (as a sort of “skin” haha) and make “fried chicken” that way. http://www.thatwasvegan.com/2013/02/20/spicy-chikn-sandwich/
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Claudia February 23, 2017, 12:23 pm
I’ve made this recipe 3 times now. I’m not vegan, but I find the prices of meat on a student budget are just ridiculous… So I’ve taken to substituting my meat meals with seitan quite often. This recipe is my favourite so far! It’s so easy to make and cook… and It hold up well wen reheated. I’ve used my not-chicken breasts in butter chicken, soups, on pizza and for fried chicken! I’m so hooked on this recipe!
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Nickolle April 2, 2017, 6:39 am
Hi, I have yet to try this recipe but I am seeing all these positive reviews and am very excited to and make it. One concern of mine though is I meal prep often and was wondering if the seitan reheats well in a microwave? Thank You.
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Barb April 5, 2017, 2:00 pm
Hi! I think that would work just fine, as long as you’re not leaving them in the microwave too long and over cooking them. Hope you enjoy!
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Gwen July 4, 2017, 10:22 pm
This was my first attempt at making seitan . I did not know what the texture was supposed to be like and I did not keep track of the kneading time so I was expecting a disaster However it turned out tasting very good. Will definitely be making this again.
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Barb July 18, 2017, 7:24 am
Good! It is a rather forgiving recipe 😉
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Emma July 18, 2017, 5:03 am
I’m a massively fussy eater and I have huge problems when it comes to trying new food. Took me a couple of days to work up the courage to try these after I made them and OMG I’m glad I did. Made up a dry batter/coating and fried them. It tasted just like KFC I was blown away!!! Thank you so much for this recipie, it is an instant favourite and will probably now be my staple meat alternative.
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Barb July 18, 2017, 7:23 am
That’s WONDERFUL news! Gave me the smiles 🙂
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Jennifer B. August 18, 2017, 1:03 pm
I have a pressure cooker that also has steamer and crock pot functions because it’s the transformer of pressure cookers. Do you think the cook time would be still the same? This will be my first time using the steaming method and I’m eager to try it. I’ve always tried the submerged/boiled seitan method but it always turns out too soft and wet in the middle so steaming sounds like a better option.
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Barb September 5, 2017, 3:13 pm
Eeek… I’m really not sure, but probably? And no, no beef version just yet.
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Jennifer B. September 2, 2017, 1:39 pm
Do you have beef version of this recipe?
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Tamara September 5, 2017, 3:11 pm
Thank you, thank you, thank you for this recipe! I’d been making seitan for years but was never really happy with the texture and this is spot on. Made it nearly as written except AP flour instead of chickpea, a bit of sage instead of poultry seasoning (both were all I happened to have on hand), and I left out the olive oil by accident. And I still absolutely loved it. Yum!
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Barb September 5, 2017, 3:14 pm
I never tire of hearing this kind of feedback 🙂
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Lauren September 12, 2017, 6:22 pm
Just made this yesterday and it came out great! This was only my second attempt at making seitan, but this was first time I’ve actually eaten it. (Yes, that’s how bad the first recipe looked and smelled!) I made the four small loaves and was wondering what a “serving size” would be?
Thanks for sharing, and I can’t wait to check out more of your recipes!
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Barb September 15, 2017, 7:14 am
Each little loaf is about 2 servings- and I’m glad you liked it!
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Denise September 13, 2017, 4:00 pm
OMG!!! My first attempt at seitan! I followed your recipe except left out the salt. This is fantastic!!! Thank you thank you
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Barb September 15, 2017, 7:12 am
Yay!
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Kirsty Peters September 27, 2017, 9:39 pm
For the final step #8…after it’s done steaming, do you leave it in the foil and let it cool that way in the fridge or do you take the foil off to let it cool? Can’t wait to try! Thanks!
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Barb October 2, 2017, 8:36 am
I usually let it cool in the foil, then transfer it to however I’m going to store or freeze it.
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Dulce October 13, 2017, 5:14 pm
I am new to seitan, is it possible to omit the oil? I eat whole food plant based and no oil
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Barb October 16, 2017, 1:34 pm
I’ve actually never tried to make it without the oil, sorry!
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Greg October 21, 2017, 3:18 pm
Made this exactly to your recipe. Superb. Chicken cutlets tomorrow! Thank you
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Barb October 25, 2017, 2:46 pm
Glad to hear it!!
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Sara October 23, 2017, 11:41 am
The mixture is super wet and does not hold together. Steaming it now. Couldn’t even knead it. Is 1.5 cups water too much?
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Barb October 25, 2017, 2:47 pm
I’m so sorry to hear that… 1.5 is the correct amount. I’ve had this happen to me once or twice, and it’s usually when I haven’t been careful in measuring the flour and VWG. When it happens, I let it steam for longer and that seems to help it firm up.
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Sara November 4, 2017, 12:03 am
The chicken was delicious! Making it again now and will add water little at a time to control it. Maybe I wasn’t careful. It still came out delicious the first time, just uneven shaped because it was too liquidy!
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Tina October 29, 2017, 6:45 pm
Thank you for this recipe, it is my go to now! Easy and tasty, makes making seitan no problem!
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Barb November 3, 2017, 2:52 pm
Yay!!
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Pilar December 18, 2017, 7:46 pm
The dough turned out wetter than the seitan recipe I normally use so I was concerned that steaming wouldn’t work well. Instead, I formed the dough into one loaf and baked at 325 degrees for 90 minutes. Turned out great!
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Barb January 3, 2018, 8:50 am
I’m glad it worked! I’ve had the dough turn out a bit wetter a few times as well, and I just steam it longer when that happens.
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Ida December 30, 2017, 12:51 pm
This was my first time making seitan because I didn’t want to spend so much money on stuff like this (at least $5 a container and it’s not even a lot!!) when you can do so much with a bag of flour(s)! My fiance loves seitan and he loved this! I made the recipe exactly as written (made up my own ‘poultry’ seasoning though instead of buying a prepackaged one). I used used a cheesecloth to wrap it and put it in a rice cooker that also functions as a steamer, with a steamer insert. My seitan loaves came out darker than the picture, though, maybe because my homemade vegetable stock was darker? Still, it tasted great and had a nice texture. I asked him if he would change anything at all but nope, it’s great! We’ve already finished off 3 of the 4 loaves since they were created last night (used them as part of a potsticker and wonton filling and as additions to vegetable soup) so I’ll do this again soon. 🙂 Thanks for sharing!!
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Barb January 3, 2018, 8:49 am
You’re very welcome, thanks for sharing your experience as well! I’m really glad you and your fiance enjoyed 🙂
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Les January 6, 2018, 9:52 am
I tried seitan a couple years ago but wasn’t successful because I got too ambitious with spices. THIS recipe looks good but I have no nutritional yeast. I’ll only be able to order online. Will it still work or is there another sub?
Thanks!
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Barb January 16, 2018, 8:31 am
Its more of a flavoring than an active ingredient, so you would probably be okay without it- although I’ve never tried.
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Les January 16, 2018, 12:11 pm
Thanks Barb. I actually found a local place that vends nutritional yeast locally, so I’ll try the original recipe, as written.
I’ll let you know!
Les
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Les February 20, 2018, 1:10 pm
Hi folks, I made this recipe and its INCREDIBLE! The one un-answered question I see is, “what is the nutritional info data?” So, I pulled out all the labels for what I used, created a spreadsheet, and here are the answers I calculated, per serving.
By Barb@ThatWasVegan.
Disclaimer: I did NOT get Barb’s okay to post this, but I hope she’ll approve. Although the vitamin and mineral values are there, especially from the spices, they were fairly insignificant, so I omitted them except for what I thought was important. Also, I ROUNDED to the nearest MG or Gram.
MY BRANDS:
I used Swanson Vegetable broth (original). Generic Extra Virgin Olive oil. Hodgson Mill Vital wheat Gluten (it takes 1.5 boxes). Publix, DRY chickpeas, finely ground. Bragg (Premium) Nutritional Yeast (Nooch!)
Although these are MY BRANDS, I expect results should be similar no matter which you use (unless you use a low-salt, whatever.)
Per the EXACT RECIPE, which yields FOUR loafs, each being TWO servings, i.e., EIGHT servings per recipe, here’s what I calculated:
Calories: 200
Fat: 8 Grams
Protein: 5 Grams
Sodium: 160 Grams
Carbs: 16
Sugars: 1
I hope this is useful, please correct if I’m in error.
I can’t wait to try different spices, i.e., BBQ, beef, turkey, etc.
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Cynthia May 11, 2018, 9:53 pm
I have question concerning the wheat gluten flour. Is there a substitute for that? Is there a gluten free recipe?
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Barb May 14, 2018, 7:37 am
There may be gluten free recipes out there, but seitan basically IS just gluten.
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Jay K May 12, 2018, 11:33 am
Wow, this came out perfect! I used my rice cooker and used the “steam” setting. My rice cooker will only steam for 30 minutes, so I set the roles thru 2 30 minute steamings and they came out fabulous. Makes it very easy! Like it WAY better than the boiling method. My question is if I want to make “sausage” style or “beef” style, so I add the ingredients to the gluten/chickpea mix of afterwards?
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Barb May 14, 2018, 7:37 am
I would add other seasonings in at the beginning!
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Amy May 27, 2018, 2:51 pm
It was my first time making seitan and I was afraid it would fail, but it was surprisingly easy and tasted great! I used the metal colander ghetto method ;). We coated it with cajun seasoning, baked it with zucchini and bell peppers in the oven, then added lime juice and sour cream (we’re not vegan) to make delicious fajitas. This is going in my recipe book for sure, thanks!
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Barb May 29, 2018, 10:39 am
I’m glad you found it easy and delicious!
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