Sweet, Sweet Sunday

This Blog is About Raw Foods and Diabetes…Yet You’re Gonna Tell Me to Fry Something?

Lately I have been debating whether I should go back to the Raw Foods
pyramid and brutally torture its believers by taking a look at the various cooking methods that we can use to violate that tower.

But I have decided that right now learning about all of the different cooking methods at one time would make it much easier in the future as we start looking at ingredients.

That way, if I tell you to saute or to fry something, you will know that there actually is a difference between the two…and what you should be doing…

So let’s look at the next dry cooking method…the one that is the favorite of Southern chefs, not to mention their husbands…

FRYING…

But frying is sacred ground to Southerners…and a scary territory for diabetics.

So let’s first consider why frying foods has gotten such a bad name?

Then let’s find out what we can do about making our fried foods healthier—okay, maybe not the fried Snickers bars and other Texas State Fair icons…

So…exactly why are fried foods bad for you?

Let’s state the obvious…

When foods are fried in oil, that oil is absorbed into every available nook, cranny, and crevice of whatever is being cooked, meaning that deep frying anything in oil will obviously add a lot of calories and way more fat and calories than those same foods had they not been fried…

For example…

  • Wendy’s large baked potato contains 278 calories and 0.4g fat
  • Wendy’s large French fries contains 420 calories and 20g fat

But have you ever realized that all that deep fried greasy food could eventually lead to…

  • Alzheimer’s
  • autoimmune disease
  • cancer
  • hardening of the arteries
  • heart attacks
  • heart disease
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol levels
  • inflammation
  • insulin resistance
  • malfunctioning of the human brain
  • obesity
  • stroke
  • type 2 diabetes

Knowing now that those who eat four to six servings of fried food per week are 39% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who eat it less than once a week may have made a lifestyle change back in our 20’s so that my husband’s not having to now take insulin shots, like almost every Southern male in America.

So not getting on those scales ever again…Almost goes without saying that those who eat fried foods more regularly are most likely to be overweight or obese. In fact, those of us who eat fried food more than four times a week have a 37% greater risk of being overweight or obese than those who eat it less than twice a week.

Another reason to avoid fried foods…Not only can eating fried foods make you gain weight because…well, because, they’re fried foods, and that’s what fried food does to you….but fried foods can also affect the hormones that regulate appetite and fat storage.

Frying Doesn’t Always Have to Mean Nutritional “Mush”

Grabbing fries from the closest drive-thru and chowing down on some “food” that is honestly nothing but “empty calories” that has lost any and all of the vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients that its original ingredients may have contained. 

Yet we are learning about the different cooking methods here, and frying is one of the most frequently used cooking method.

So let’s learn to fry not only the “right” way, but a “healthy” way that leaves us with a nutritious and tasteful dish that doesn’t have to be smothered with lots and lots of ketchup.

Sweet, Sweet Sunday

How to De-Funk Your Kitchen—Enhance

Now that you’ve gotten rid of whatever it might have been making your kitchen smell terrible and taken the time to clean out the fridge and shelves from rotten food, it’s time for a more fun thing to do…enhance the odors around your home.

Here are a few ideas…

Air Freshener…Use plug-in air fresheners, stand alone air fresheners, or spray air freshenera.

Air Vents…Clip a car deodorizer to the metal slats of your air vent. As the air blows through the vent, the scent will waft throughout the room

Baking…The aroma of warm baked goods—such as cinnamon rolls or banana bread—will fill the house with a pleasant scent quickly.

Baking Soda…Leaving a box of baking soda open in your fridge actually does absorb any smells in your fridge.

Candles…Candles are almost a given in any room, right? 

Charcoal....Putting a piece or two of charcoal in a bowl in your fridge will absorb smells, just as baking soda does.

Citrus…Collect any orange, lemon or lime peels. Bake them at 350 degrees for a few minutes. When you open the oven door. they will make your kitchen smell wonderful.

Cleaning…Use great smelling products, such as Dr Bronner’s,

Diffusers…Diffusers, both electric diffusers and reed diffusers, can be used along with your favorite essential oils to create a more pleasant smell.

Dryer Sheets..Tape a new dryer sheet to the back of your buffet or china cabinet. Also could stash one where you store your kitchen towels and stuff.

FloorsSoak a cotton ball with something that you really like the smell of…such as your favorite perfume or essential oil. Then drop it into the vacuum cleaner bag. As you do your regular chores, the vacuum will gently release the scent into the room.

Houseplants…Houseplants—such as geraniums, Arabian jasmine, eucalyptus, gardenias, corsage orchids, and Cuban oregano—are not only attractive but also clean the air.

Lights..Before turning your lights on, place a couple drops of vanilla extract on your light bulbs.This will gently spread the scent once you do flip the lights on and make your home smell like fresh-baked cookies.

Sachet…Use scented sachets—little fabric sacks filled with cinnamon sticks, dried lavender, dried herbs, potpourri, or scented rice—to give your drawers a more pleasant, yet natural, aroma.

Simmer…Another easy way to freshen the air would be a “simmer pot.”

To do this, fill a small pan with a cup or two of water. Next add what you are going to simmer. Bring to a boil for a few minutes. Then let simmer for a few hours on your back stove eye, adding more water as needed. As the water heats, the scent will be permeated throughout your kitchen and house.

Some good ideas as to what to simmer include…

  • a drop or two of essential oil
  • a handful of cloves
  • cinnamon sticks
  • citrus slices
  • fresh herbs—such as lavender or mint
  • lemon and orange peels
  • vanilla

Tea…Make a pot of homemade chai tea by first boiling 3C water with 20 cardamom pods, 15 whole cloves, 2 cinnamon sticks, and 1Tbsp ginger. Simmer 5 min. Add 3 tea bags. Brew and then strain. Finally add milk and sugar as needed.

Vinegar… Set a small bowl of vinegar on your counter whenever you are cooking something with a definite odor, such as fish…honestly think that I’d rather smell the fish than the vinegar though right?

Wreaths….Buy or make your own kitchen wreath using fresh herbs…such as this wreath Creek Side Farms.