Getting Healthy, Sweet, Sweet Sunday

Fiber—The How?!

In order to get the fiber that each of us needs, it is important to eat a well-balanced diet that includes delicious whole foods that are naturally rich in fiber—such as fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts.

 

But before we take a look at what foods provide you with the most fiber, here are two important things to keep in mind…

  1. When starting a high-fiber diet, it is important that increase to the recommended amount of fiber in your diet slowly and gradually in order to give your body time to adapt. If you increase your fiber intake too quickly, you may experience a bloated feeling and abdominal cramps.
  2. It is also important that you drink plenty of water and non-caffeinated beverages, especially if you’re taking fiber supplements instead of getting your fiber through real foods, because supplements contain none of the liquids found in high-fiber foods.

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Now, let’s talk about food…one of my favorite topics…using the Raw Foods Pyramid as a guide.

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Leafy Greens…The bottom…no, make that the next to the bottom tier, if you count water as a “food”…is leafy greens. A good rule of thumb is to always choose the darkest colored greens because the darker the color, the higher the fiber and overall nutritional content.

  • Broccoli...Not exactly sure if broccoli counts as a leafy green or a vegetable, but one cup of broccoli contains 5.1 grams of fiber….making broccoli one of the highest fiber sources from the vegetable, or leafy green, food group.

 

 

Fruits and Vegetables…The second-to-the-bottom tier is the fruits and vegetables tier. This group is important because most fruits and vegetables are high in fibe

Now let’s take a look at a few of the better sources of fiber from the produce section…

But first a few tips about adding fruits and vegetables to your diet…

  1. As soon as you come back from your farmer’s market, grocery store, or wherever you buy your produce, go ahead and wash and cut the fruits and vegetables that you could eat for snack foods—such as carrots and celery, Keep these available in your fridge so that you always have a healthy snack to nibble on when those midnight hunger attacks happen.
  2. Choose recipes that feature the high-fiber ingredients shown on this list.
  3. Eat a piece of fruit for dessert.
  4. Eating whole fruits and vegetables, as opposed to drinking fruit or vegetable juice, allows you to get more fiber and at the same time get fewer calories. For example, one medium fresh orange contains about 3g of fiber and only 60 calories…An 8-ounce glass of orange juice contains almost no fiber and about 110 calories, while
  5. Keep the peel on. Peeling fruits—such as apples and pears—reduces the amount of fiber, as well as many other nutrients.
  6. Show them off. Make sure to keep your fruits and vegetables at eye level, where you can easily see them and are more likely to reach for them when sweet cravings kick in.
  • Apples…One medium apple, with the peel lefton, contains 4.4 grams of fiber.
  • Asian Pears…One medium Asian pears contains 9.9 grams of fiber…as well as  Vitamin C, vitamin K, omega-6 fatty acids, and potassium.
  • Avocado…One medium avocado contains 10.1 grams fiber per cup…as well as Vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin K, potassium. As we already saw in earlier posts, avocados are also packed with healthy fats that help lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease. Remember that Florida avocados—the bright green, smooth-skinned variety—have significantly more insoluble fiber than California avocados–the smaller, darker and dimpled variety.
  • Banana…One banana has a little over 3 grams of fiber, as well as a high amount of potassium, an essential nutrient that helps regulate blood pressure.
  • Blackberries…One cup of blackberries contains 7.6 grams of fiber—twice as much as other berries, such as strawberries and blueberries, as well as other important nutrients—such as Vitamin C, vitamin K, omega-6 fatty acids, potassium, magnesium, and manganese.
  • Coconut…One cup of coconut has 7.2 grams of fiber, four to six times the amount of fiber as oat bran—as well as other important nutrients such as manganese, omega-6 fatty acids, folate, and selenium.Coconut flour and coconut oil are two great ways to add healthy natural fiber to your diet. For most baking recipes, you can substitute up to 20 percent coconut flour for other flours.
  • Dried Figs…One-fourth of a cup of dried figs contains 3.7 grams of fiber. Each fig contains nearly one gram of fiber and about 20 calories.
  • Figs…One large fig contains 1.9 grams of fiber, as well as other important nutrients—such as pantothenic acid, potassium, manganese, copper, and vitamin B6. Because  figs have a nearly perfect balance between soluble fiber and insoluble fiber, they are associated with lower blood pressure and protection against macular degeneration, in addition to the benefits of the fiber.
  • Oranges…One medium orange contains 3.1 grams of fiber.
  • Pears…One medium unpeeled pear contains 5.5 grams of fiber.
  • Pomegranate Seeds…The seeds in one half of a pomegranate contain 5.6 grams of fiber.
  • Raspberries…One cup of raspberries contains 8 grams of fiber, the highest amount of any fruit, as well as many other nutrients—such as  Vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, folate, and manganese.

Vegetables

  • Artichokes…One-half of a cup of artichoke hearts contains 4.8 grams of fiber. One medium artichoke contains 10.3 grams of fiber, which is nearly half of the recommend fiber intake for women and a third for men. Artichokes also contain other important nutrients—such as Vitamins A, C, E, B, K; potassium; calcium; magnesium; phosphorous.
  • Brussels Sprouts…One cup of Brussels sprouts contains 4 grams of fiber, as well as many other important nutrients—such as vitamins C, K, B1, B2, B6; folate, and manganese. As well as being one of the better high-fiber foods, Brussels sprouts also contain antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties that support healthy detox and may reduce the risk of some types of cancer.
  • Butternut Squash…One cup of baked butternut squash contains 6.6 grams of fiber.
  • Canned Pumpkin…One half of a cup of canned pumpkin contains 3.6 grams of fiber.
  • Carrots…One cup of carrots contains 3.6 grams of fiber.
  • Okra…One-half of a cup of okay contains 2 grams of fiber, as well as many other important nutrients—such as Vitamins A, C, K; riboflavin, thiamine, niacin, calcium, iron, phosphorous, zinc, and protein.
  • Parsnips…One cup of parsnips, a close relative of the carrot family, contains 7 grams of fiber.
  • Russet Potato…One medium Russet potato that has been baked with the skin still intact contains 4 grams of fiber.
  • Sweet Potato…One medium sweet potato baked with the skin still intact contains 3.8 grams of fiber and only 160 calories.
  • Turnips…One cup of turnips contains 3.1 grams of fiber, as well as other important nutrients—such as Vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, and potassium.
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